Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've never flipped with my yeti, but wonder just how dry it would be after some time upside down.

It has a nice rubber gasket, and closes tightly.
Any comments on yeti as a drybox?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
Should work great. To test your cooler, next time your driving to someplace 2-4,000 feet lower than Crested Butte take your cooler close it than try to open it at lower altitude. If it is vacuumed sealed and hard to open it will be water proof :smile: If it really seals tight like a couple of my coolers do, loosening the drain plug makes it easy to open :cool:
 
  • Like
Reactions: CB Rob

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,207 Posts
It's also a waste of space but I'm sure the OP is just thinking in a pinch, or for certain trips.

Would it work? Yes, maybe if that cooler seals every time. My yeti definitely doesn't seal anymore - I have to work each spring to even get it closed. It gets better after it's been used a while. The other thing to think about would be the latches... They'd be awfully easy to pop one with a foot when going out of the boat or what not. You'd definitely want it strapped closed... that begs why not change the latches to butterfly latches if you want it to stay closed?

I don't think it's a great idea and I probably wouldn't put anything in it that couldn't get at least damp - the odds will be that'll it'll leak.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Yetis have a tapered seal to allow dry ice gas to escape so they don't turn into bombs. I would think that if it lets gas out, it would let water out as well if filled and flipped over (as proposed as a test above). I have never had water ingress into my 65qt on the back of my cat, but never attempted sensitive equipment just sammiches, dry sweater, polar fleece pants, and my wallet (which has no cash so it can swim if it wants...). I agree my lid seems to have warped with time and may not seal as well it did off the shelf. I also use a strap around it when day trips involve a good chance of swimming...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
I thought CB Rob was asking about food safety, not planning on using as a dry box. Maybe I did not understand his question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
798 Posts
that's a good point, I was thinking of how I've tested dry boxes before. Generally if water can get out it will get in. Even dry boxes don't tend to be 100% I don't think. I've never had a cooler seal as well as bighorn was talking about, only Pelican's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,085 Posts
I don't think it's a great idea and I probably wouldn't put anything in it that couldn't get at least damp - the odds will be that'll it'll leak.
Fair enough and that's good advice for either, but I'm not sure that its any worse of an idea than an aluminum dry box. I already put water sensitive items in a dry bag before putting them in the dry box because I've read a hundred times here on the buzz (and I've seen it myself) that dry boxes aren't all that dry either. In fact, Judging by the pressure that I've seen come out of my cooler I would actually bet that a good quality cooler still seals better than an aluminum dry box. Unless it has some tiny holes drilled in it of course :rolleyes:

Anyway, I guess it depends on the cooler and drybox. Yours sounds different than mine and so on and so forth.
 

·
Misspellingintothefuture!
Joined
·
1,901 Posts
Could always just build yourself one.
Biggest problem with home made plywood dry boxes, is they are not completely waterproof, but if aluminum dry boxes and yetis are leaking... Can be a good option if you enjoy some wood working, you're probly further ahead just buying one by the time you build one, but there is something rewarding about river gear that you built yourself, and the natural beauty of wood has an appeal, at least for people like me.
Having a drip edge is key, I had no water in my dry box running the Grand this winter, and I submerged the 14' a few times. Probly would have been a different story if I would have flipped though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
yeti

So yea, it would be an expensive drybox.
I am using a Ceiba cooler for cold food and just tossing around the idea of putting some drygoods in the yeti.
I've got an 18 ft cat, with lots of bays. One of the other trip members has offered to let me use his spare aluminum box, but I doubt it seals any tighter than a yeti. I also liked the soft edges of the yeti compared to the aluminum box, for climbing around on the boat, or slipping and falling on stuff.

I appreciate the feedback guys.
 

·
Misspellingintothefuture!
Joined
·
1,901 Posts
My Engle, um, girlfriends Engle, doubles as a drybox nicely, has never leaked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
I use 2 coolers rather than a cooler and dry box on my boat. I like the versatility, but my coolers have 3 butterfly latches each so they are a little bit of a pain to get into. I have never had an issue with water, but I have also never flip tested the coolers. You loose interior space vs a dry box because of the insulation, but the versatility makes it worth the trade off for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
In the end, it's all about what you have and what you need at the time. My coolers turn into really expensive garbage cans as the trip goes on.

My boat also becomes a really expensive diversion dam on the middle chute of Rainey Falls.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top