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Wrapped a 13 foot, 2 year old hyside raft today, one of the worst wraps myself or any of the guides on the trip have ever seen. high tube was almost a foot under the water, low tube somewhere down by Elvis.

A very interested then very involved construction crew saw us..... long story short, got a 1 ton full size diesel pickup with a 15,000 lb winch on the front of it on the roadside. We wrapped webbing around the front left perimeter tube, through the holes in the glued in self bailing floor, carabinered that to our rope out of our NRS wrap kit, and attached the rope to the cable and winch.

The truck was sitting upsream slightly of the pinned boat, and about 50 vertical feet higher than the boat, perfect position for lifting the boat off the rock.

As we started winding in the winch, the boat was moving slightly, but the 12,000lb truck was being pulled sideways across dry pavement! I thought my boat was trashed. we continued to pull, the boat deformed and bent in ways a raft shouldn't, the truck was dragged close to three feet and almost rested on the guard rail when the boat popped off the rock.

The incredible part about this story is that the boat was absolutely unscathed. watching the forces put on that boat, and seeing it come out of the situation as good as it went into it, is a testament to the durability and quality of Hyside Inflatables products. Very impressive. We loaded guests back in it and continued down the river. Hyside's durability saved us alot of money we would have had to refund if the boat was wrecked and we could not continue the trip!

Without that truck and winch we would still be out there trying to get that thing un-pinned. Thanks to the great guys and gals at that construction crew!
 

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Glad everyone is safe and the boat made it too. I think you spent up all your good river karma bucks today though ha ha!
 

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awesome story man. bet that was fun to watch!! yet another testament to hyside being the shit. mama always told me, ya get what ya pay for.
try that with a saturn. or even an nrs-e. go ahead. i dare ya!!
 

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I hope I never test my Hyside's durability that way! I cringe a little when someone steps into it without rinsing the sand & grit off their shoes.
 

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My question is, How and Where did you get a boat that pinned? Story just sounds more like an ad for hyside then it does the truth. Your clients had to be a little worried getting back in the boat with you after something like that. Also must have been tough to web through the boat with it being a foot underwater.
 

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I Wonder?

I agree, I'm calling BS on this tale. Standard anchor webbing is rated to approx 4000 lbs and the forces needed to move a "12000 lb truck 3' sideways" would have broke that webbing imho. But I'm not a real rescue guy I just play one at work. I think some some smarter buzzards then me can offer an opinion??
But I'm willing to eat a big piece of humble pie if I see some pics.

My question is, How and Where did you get a boat that pinned? Story just sounds more like an ad for hyside then it does the truth. Your clients had to be a little worried getting back in the boat with you after something like that. Also must have been tough to web through the boat with it being a foot underwater.
 

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it depends on the webbing, sure, 4000 is a reasonable estimate i suppose, but say you tie a knot into it, to lets say a carribiner, then that reduces it's tensile strength at that point.

I'm no physics person, but.......if you move a 12,000 lb truck sideways, wouldn't that take more than 12,000 lbs of force or more with vectors (50 feet down)?

it also sounds to me that the right vector pull wasn't happening on the boat, if it were roadside and being pulled with a truck then you should be able to set a different angle, which can make all kinds of a difference.

I would also love to see a picture to prove my doubt.
 

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This isn't an entirely unreasonable account, though not complete enough to know.

1) I once pulled stumps with a similar 4wd truck for a summer job. Once in a pinch I used old retired climbing webbing and older 22 or 25kn biners. the truck spun 4 tires and the webbing and biners held. Eventually my super old ratty army surplus rope broke. This was after several small stumps. The rope whipping broke a huge window and it looked like a bomb went off in the house.

2) puilling a vehicle across pavement doesn't necessarily take more force than the weight of the vehicle. It depends on the road, the tires, the load distribution and numerous other factors. I can drag stuff across pavement that I could never ever lift and carry, even if the bottom is rubber coated. Again I have spun tires on pavement with regular climbing gear used as anchors.

3) Webbing is super strong in loops. pre-tie a big loop, pull the loop flat and run it through the floor hole, bring both ends together and you basically have quadruple webbing strength. Maybe it is only double if you consider knots, bends and other factors- but that is a lot still.

4) a good static line can certainly handle this load

5) the biners are probably the weak link unless they are steel or something pretty high grade, not $5 omega d's. (20kn?) doubling biners would do wonders for the strength of the system.

6) I agree that a new vector would have been a lower impact thing to try, but I am happy the truck story is on here.

7) If I was a paid client on this trip I would be terrified.
"OK that was crazy, let's get back in the boat and keep going."
 

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Very impressive testament to the boat.

It's mostly insignificant but the forces weren't as high as they have been made out to be. A fully loaded one ton is going to max out somewhere under 10k lbs (mine has a GVW of 9,900), empty is about 7k. It doesn't take anywhere near the weight of the vehicle to pull it on pavement, about 70% of it at best. Since it's winching from only the front, which holds maybe 70% (at best) of the weight of the truck, now we're talking even smaller, maybe 3,500 lbs to pull the truck sideways. Still a hell of a lot.

My bigger question is why would they have set it up with a side load on the winch? It would have been much more effective to pull in a straight direction.

I’ve always wondered if I could winch a wrapped boat or a pinned log with my Jeep, it doesn’t sound like I’d have much success.
 
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