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Fab'd a stand for a Woodland Power Stove. I call it the Woodland Power Bottom :grin:. Provides a larger and more stable base for larger pots. Inspired by a prototype stand from Woodland for two stoves I bought from ReadNRun here.


I think I like it. Super stable. Might add hinges so that the square base can fold in half. I'll use this summer and see how it goes. I also just bought a Partner blaster so I can see which one wins out.
 

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Nice setup. Another thing you can do for larger pots is to turn the 3 stove brackets so the "V" points outward. This doesn't solve the stability issue of the smaller base though.
 

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Nice setup. Another thing you can do for larger pots is to turn the 3 stove brackets so the "V" points outward. This doesn't solve the stability issue of the smaller base though.

I was under the impression that the "V"'s pointing out was how it was supposed to be assembled? Hadn't seen it with the "V" pointing in before... But then, I only use the little woodland stove and my blaster for heating water in large containers.



I own both the woodland stove, and the Partner Steel Blaster, here's my take on how they stack up.

First off, they are 2 different stoves, that work well for what they are, just in different situations. The woodland stove uses less propane, and provides less heat than the blaster, they are a little bit quieter, and weigh considerably less than the blaster. It's nice that they fold, but I worry about losing the parts to it, it's sorta a pain to put together at first, but then you learn the tricks. The little doohickey on the chain, well I've never used it, it eventually came off the chain and was lost. The one thing I wasn't too keen on was the soot that accumulated on the bottom of pots and pails when you tried to either simmer, or hit it full blast.



Small (number of people) trips the woodland stove is just fine, I did a 6 person Grand trip this year and it was perfect, I can't see it meeting the needs of a 12 or larger person trip though, that's where the blaster comes in, sucking propane and heating water as fast as it can, need coffee for 50 in 5 minutes, that's where the Blaster shines.

As well, controlling the simmer temps of either stove is iffy, I wouldn't actually try and cook anything on either of them though, I am sure there are those that do, I just prefer the partner steel cook partner for that.



My 2¢, your mileage may vary
 

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I've cooked on both the Partner Blaster and Woodland power stove. Heck...on a trip where everyone went Solo with their kitchens and food...the woodland was the only stove I brought and it worked great. You just have to cook fast and pay attention. It actually works really well for stuff like stir fry's and similar dishes...it almost acts like a Wok burner. You just have to make sure you move the pot/pan around frequently since both stoves tend to heat up a small area very quickly.

The diffuser chain came off of my woodland too but I just stick it in the bottom of the bag. I've used it a few times...but rarely. The soot gets even worse with it in...which is kind of a bummer. It definitely spreads out the heat...but almost too much. The rest of the woodland system is all integrated...so I'd find it hard to loose any other part then the diffuser.

The base looks nice...but even with heavy chic pails or a large pot of water I've never had a problem keeping the Woodland stable. I guess its kind hard to get stuff centered on the triangle sometimes...but I've never had a tip over because of it.

I like the stove stands I've seen from others that raise the stove up so you don't have to bend over to use it though.
 

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I've cooked on both the Partner Blaster and Woodland power stove. Heck...on a trip where everyone went Solo with their kitchens and food...the woodland was the only stove I brought and it worked great. You just have to cook fast and pay attention. It actually works really well for stuff like stir fry's and similar dishes...it almost acts like a Wok burner. You just have to make sure you move the pot/pan around frequently since both stoves tend to heat up a small area very quickly.

The diffuser chain came off of my woodland too but I just stick it in the bottom of the bag. I've used it a few times...but rarely. The soot gets even worse with it in...which is kind of a bummer. It definitely spreads out the heat...but almost too much. The rest of the woodland system is all integrated...so I'd find it hard to loose any other part then the diffuser.

The base looks nice...but even with heavy chic pails or a large pot of water I've never had a problem keeping the Woodland stable. I guess its kind hard to get stuff centered on the triangle sometimes...but I've never had a tip over because of it.

I like the stove stands I've seen from others that raise the stove up so you don't have to bend over to use it though.

Yep, I should have added that I haven't had an issue with stability either, sometimes in sand, you need to put a rock under the legs or something though, had toyed with a sheet of .125 AL but it just seemed overkill, and one more thing to carry
 

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On the Powerstove turn "V" in for small pots and out for large pots.

I like the versatility of folding in the legs and using it as a flame thrower to light charcoal or driftwood in a firepan especially if the driftwood is wet from rain(think May-June in Idaho).

I replaced the regulator on the Powerstove with micro pet cocks. Use two for better control. Caution is advised if you do this. Takes some getting used to. Suggest everyone step back and put duct tape over your eyebrows and mustaches until mastered. With pet cocks or upgraded regulator it can produce a scary amount of BTU's. More than practically needed. BTW, there was a period of time when some of the regulators that came with the stove were faulty. About 2005 or 2006 as I recall.

I have the Woodland single stove stand and love it. It is stainless steel and is not light, almost too heavy. It has adjustable length legs in 1" increments. If made out of aluminum it would certainly not be as durable or blaster flame compatible. Setting up the stand takes practice but it is labeled with letters to help simplify the task. Without the labels you'd usually end up with a ridiculous contortion of metal or you'd throw it in the river in frustration.
 

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BTW, Nice work Jeffro!

And BTW, if you can't make that Woodland bounce on the ground from flame recoil consider upgrading the regulator. Regulators come rated in BTU potential and in much higher quality then OEM. Just saying.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
7lbs 3oz. So you're not exactly gonna backpack with the thing. Likely overkill and solving a problem that does not exist. But I like overkill. And solvinng problems that don't exist.



I also do a wilderness fried turkey for thanksgiving and am trying to figure out a more packable setup for that. Frying turkeys is taking your life in your hands at home, let alone in the wilds so it needs to be stable.
 

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another nice thing about the woodland power stove is the V's are oriented in such a way that the legs of a 12 inch Dutch actually lock into the stove.. I looked for a long time for the stand for mine but i think they stopped making it. That might be a winter project..

Speaking of legs and stoves here are some pictures of a set of aluminum legs i built for my camp chef mountaineer. they make legs for it but are too short to be useful.
 

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Dumb question: If you can build a stand, why bother using a commercial burner? Sorry, but I'm not a proponent of these stoves for their cost/benefit. Reminds me of olden day backpacking conversations where the MSR whisperlite stoves were the rage. They were lightweight, expensive, and difficult to control at lower temperature outputs.

Both the Blaster and the Power Stove are stone simple. It's basically an open jet with a venturi.

Here's some tech on BTU's, pressure, flow, and jet sizes:
https://ronreil.abana.org/design1.shtml

If you want a project, I'd modify a turkey cooker burner. A 4" "high pressure" cast iron burner will put out more BTU's than a WPS, and you can also simmer with them.
 

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Dumb question: If you can build a stand, why bother using a commercial burner? Sorry, but I'm not a proponent of these stoves for their cost/benefit. Reminds me of olden day backpacking conversations where the MSR whisperlite stoves were the rage. They were lightweight, expensive, and difficult to control at lower temperature outputs.

Lord the memories you just caused to reappear in my mind, we used to have "Boil off's between the SVEA 123 and the MSR XGK, the XGK would sometimes beat the SVEA, but the SVEA simmered and the XGK didn't. I have a whisperlite for winter camping, but it doesn't hold a candle to the SVEA or the XGK as far as ability to heat things in a reasonable time.



I bought the woodland stove cause it was small, and light, and folks that have them think highly of them. It's not a bad design, especially for my Dory as it packs really small. The downside is sooty pot and pan bottoms...
The main problem with the turkey cooker burners like you posted a photo of, the flames are very susceptible to wind, and they don't heat nearly as rapidly as the stoves designed for that, blaster / WPS. I remeember when folks used to bring those HUGE camp chef cooker things with 3 of them in a row, huge and heavy sucking tons of propane.



Not to mention that while I've seen some use them, I've never seen one that compacts much, let alone as easily as the commercial ones. Much like the camp chef stove LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Dumb question: If you can build a stand, why bother using a commercial burner?

Fair question. I have two woodland power stoves and the commercially made stainless steel stand. So originally the idea was to have a versatile system based on the powerstove. Take the big stand and two stoves for a larger crowd, this stand and one if I needed just a "blaster". Bring a woodland stove for light trip.


But now I'm moving away from the double stand because it is heavy and you can't run the power stove low enough without sooting everything up.


I bought a Camp Chef Everest. It's like a standard Coleman but double the BTU. I plan to sell the Woodland double stove stand. Probably keep a Woodland and this base for boiling water and frying turkey.



Reminds me of olden day backpacking conversations where the MSR whisperlite stoves were the rage. They were lightweight, expensive, and difficult to control at lower temperature outputs.

Excellent point. I have an MSR XGK stove in my basement from the 90s that I never use. More expensive than the wisperlight, sounds like a jet engine, and cannot simmer. I might be a slow learner.
 

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Excellent point. I have an MSR XGK stove in my basement from the 90s that I never use. More expensive than the wisperlight, sounds like a jet engine, and cannot simmer. I might be a slow learner.

Not a slow learner, the XGK was a beast as far as bringing things to temp rapidly, it just burned everything to the bottom of the pot if you didn't watch it like a hawk !! One reason we liked the SVEA instead, was smaller too, but you had to carry spare fuel for more than an overnight.
 

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I bought the woodland stove cause it was small, and light, and folks that have them think highly of them. It's not a bad design, especially for my Dory as it packs really small. The downside is sooty pot and pan bottoms...

Yeah, I dislike the soot.



The main problem with the turkey cooker burners like you posted a photo of, the flames are very susceptible to wind, and they don't heat nearly as rapidly as the stoves designed for that, blaster / WPS. I remember when folks used to bring those HUGE camp chef cooker things with 3 of them in a row, huge and heavy sucking tons of propane.

Didn't realize they still don't heat as quickly as the blaster/WPS. May have to try a bigger regulator?


Not to mention that while I've seen some use them, I've never seen one that compacts much, let alone as easily as the commercial ones. Much like the camp chef stove LOL

Fits in a small 50mm can:




I bought a Camp Chef Everest. It's like a standard Coleman but double the BTU. I plan to sell the Woodland double stove stand.
Those look sweet. Have you used it yet? Should be more heat than a Partner, too. I've been eyeing it and the Mountaineer that codycleve posted...I don't get out enough to justify the $$$ of a Partner.
 

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The partner stoves are rated at 10K BTU's per burner, more than enough for me to cook (read burn food on) on, the Blaster is 140K BTU and the woodland stove is 60K BTU..
 

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Mt4runner has It right. The cast iron 60000 burners are the shit. Been using them for years to brew beer. Get one of those and a 10 lb regulator/hose assembly and put it in something like the last pic. They will simmer without sooting up the pot and they don’t sound like a jet plane at full bore. You can BOIL 5 gallons of water in less than a half hour. (my water comes out of the spigot at less than 60 degrees) I will try to post up pics of my latest design in the next couple of days. The burner, hose and regulator can be had for less than 40 bucks online.
 

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You can BOIL 5 gallons of water in less than a half hour. (my water comes out of the spigot at less than 60 degrees)

And that's the beauty of the Partner Steel Blaster, you can BOIL 5 gallons of water in under 10 minutes... Yes, it sounds like a jet engine, yes, it sucks propane, but getting the trip on the water early in the AM, a 20 minute savings in time, to me anyway, is worth it's weight in gold. I bought my Blaster 20 years ago, and save for replacing the hose, it's never failed me.
 

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I’ve seen some of the turkey burners >100k btu which gets in a similar range of the Partner. It might soot just as bad though. Mine does about 75k but isn’t nearly as compact as the one MT4R fabricated.
 
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