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I have been looking into wood burning stoves with a flue that I can put into a yurt-like structure. The motivation is a 25-day Grand trip in the middle of January, driftwood is free to harvest that time of the year, and we don't particularly want to freeze our a$$es off over night. Also, the idea of cooking in a warm enclosure is very appealing.

I was thinking an ammo can stove like the ones found here. Does anyone have any advice on this sort of thing? Everything from stove (I am willing to make my own or buy one) to tent setup is up in the air.
 

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We used one on our Jan trip a few years back. Was great to have a few nights but only came out a handful of time (like 6 days straight of rain). We used it under tarps so a tipi setup could obviously provide greater benefit and warmth.

In reality we found a classic fire pan to be more enjoyable most of the time. The glow/light alone is worth a lot in the winter. We only setup up camp structures when there was rain. Being outside in the canyon is half the charm.

Make sure to bring some type of spark arrester if you want to use it around any sort of nylon structure. Also plan on wood hunting well in advance of the majority of camps as wood is only abundant in a few places.

Phillip
 
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Check out seekoutside.com. I use a 12 mam tepee amd titanium xl stove and There awesome
 

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made this from an ammo can, the river sauna worked great. 25 days in December, swimming in the river just to cool off! the legs fit inside for storage, the stove pipe collapses. heat water on top the stove and hot showers anytime you need.
 

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Another vote for the Ceiba stove! We used it on a November trip a couple years ago - not only is it great to have a heat source and still be able to see the stars (my only complaint about campfires in general), but the chimney also puts the smoke above eye level, so there's not that constant shuffling around trying to get out of the smoke stream!
 

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My stove is one of the small ones. Legs are 3/16" stainless and support the stove and small water pan with no problems. Titanium handles high heat better than steel or stainless steel. It gets red hot and transfers heat very well. Bottom warps but has not affected fit or function.Went down the lower Gunnison in early December, took the coals from the fire pan and put them in the stove. Nice to have a warm bag to get into and a warm tent in the morning while we waited for the sun to come up.
 

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I do not know what your price point is... but we have a three dog in our Yurt and is great...

great tips here too on fire building

Four Dog Stove offers steel and titanium wood burning stoves, outdoor wood fired stove | Colorado, Oregon, Washington, Wyoming
Boy, those are nice.
You get what you pay for.
I noticed that the front top corners had taken some damage. Even without use but the stoves still look durable.

The fire lighting technique is commonly done in other stoves by having a bit of vented ribbing along the bottom. Strengthens the bottom too. That works especially well with the air being supplied from higher where the air gets heated before. More efficient combustion.
That tech costs because its work plus materials and would make these really expensive.

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Most people don't consider stoves because they like the view of the fire.

You can get warmer with a stove than an equivalent sized open fire.
Efficient. Use less wood. Less impact.
Lungs and eyes take in far less smoke with the flues.
Use in tents with some rules.
Warm or cook on easier and cleaner than a fire grate.
Safer because a 3 inch fire pan lip doesn't stop sparks like a spark arrestor.
Stoves can extend the heat.

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Cost and a big negative is you'll get friends. Too many friends.

Boy would a sheep herder have died for one of these.
 

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My stove is one of the small ones. Legs are 3/16" stainless and support the stove and small water pan with no problems. Titanium handles high heat better than steel or stainless steel. It gets red hot and transfers heat very well. Bottom warps but has not affected fit or function.Went down the lower Gunnison in early December, took the coals from the fire pan and put them in the stove. Nice to have a warm bag to get into and a warm tent in the morning while we waited for the sun to come up.
One could come up with four pieces of small diameter pipe that would strengthen those legs and be removable. Small item, small price.
 
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