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I would like to get some beta on a Ruby/Horsethief winter run. I have not done this stretch before and was thinking with the mild winter we have been having it would be a good time to try it out when it will be relatively empty.

I was wondering about water levels, so post I found said 2K is low water. I have a 14' rig.

Also which campsite are worth stopping at?

How prepared for the water should we be? I have a dry suit but that seem a bit much to me considering the Class of the river.

Anything else I should know?

Thanks for you the help
 

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Plenty of water, shouldn't be any ice. Tons of great campsites, just stop wherever looks good. If you've never been there you won't be familiar with which sites are where anyway. Hard to go wrong. Probably better to dress for winter hiking and camping than whitewater. You won't get wet unless you fall in/step in the river. Muck boots are probably more appropriate than a drysuit.
 

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I love fringe season trips and have done several very cold Thanksgiving R&H trips, which is probably comparable to right now.

Rough time of year for campsites as most of them have northern aspects. I would stay away from Bull or Rattlesnake the first day as they are close to cliffs and will likely be in shadow most of the day. The Cottonwoods will likely be your best bet for a little sun and hiking options (plenty of wandering on benches above); Beaver Trail if you want earlier sun in the morning but not real hiking there. Mee Canyon, Black Rock 1 or 6-10 will likely have best sun but you can choose when you get down there as you will have the place to yourself (assuming waterfowl hunt is over in CO).

Winter/fringe season camping is all about going loaded for bear. Muck boots are key; work gloves of some form to help rig and avoid direct contact with cold or frosty metal frame. Bomber personal and group shelter for precipitation and wind. Dry kindling, bark, etc for fire starting in any condition. Some way to entertain oneself through the long night.

Have fun...I love the solitude of this time of year and the experience itself is unique.

Phillip
 
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