Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am Running windows 7 + 8 on my desktop and laptop respectively. I keep getting the free upgrade pop up's. Has anyone pulled the trigger on the upgrade? Any feedback on ease of use and networking/ devise compatibility?

I had a machine that came with Vista and missed the free upgrade window and ended up having to buy 7 when vista fell apart. I'd like to avoid that but also don't want to jump down a rabbit hole with more problems.

Thanks
 

·
Renaissance Redneck
Joined
·
1,265 Posts
Your a big ol fish. Dont get hooked.
That said, I'm no early adopter but I hear from the tech department that it handles about like Win8 but is much more stable.
I just X that little box out every time I boot lately.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,050 Posts
I've heard that Windows 10 is far superior to previous versions in it's capabilities to harvest your personal data but don't know much else about it. Maybe there's someone on the Buzz that knows about computers that can weigh in with an informed opinion. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
I've talked to our IT guy about it a bit... my understanding is that it's ever-evolving, based on user feedback. So yeah, sounds like in a nutshell it collects the fuck out of your info, and it's never going to be finished. However, I do think you can opt out of most of the personal info collection. Windows 8 has a lot of tracking stuff too that you have to shut off, so I guess it's not really that much of a difference. I'm just wary of a computer program that's constantly changing. I've been debating switching over too, mostly because my laptop crashed and the warranty company replaced the motherboard but installed the wrong version of Windows 8, so I can't upgrade to 8.1 and I've got all the stupid glitchy errors going on. The IT guy suggested I make the switch, but I'm kinda biding my time to see reviews and the like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
You can always install it, try it out, see if you like it. If you decide you don't like it, it's really easy to uninstall updates.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
I've been running it since last Jan/Feb-ish (beta) on my home PC, and I like it. I upgraded my laptop a few weeks ago, and am planning on doing my work PC whenever I can afford the downtime.

It does collect a lot of info by default, but if you choose "Customize settings" during the install you can turn all of that off. It's in small font and easy to miss, so look carefully for it.

Windows 8 was a disaster because they forced a tablet interface on desktop/server users, but they mostly fixed that with 8.1. Windows 10 continues the trend and makes the user interface a bit more like Windows 7. It was a little buggier than 8 was at launch (8 was stable, they just made poor design choices), but most of those have been fixed and none of the bugs are show stoppers. For example, the Start menu would only display 512 items so if you had hundreds of programs installed you wouldn't see them all and they wouldn't show up in search (I think that's been bumped up with one of the updates, but it never bothered me so I'm not sure). If you drag a shortcut to your start menu button, it says it's going to pin to start, but it doesn't actually do anything. You have to right-click and choose Pin to Start. I think that's actually the only bug I've noticed that still hasn't been fixed.

I don't like that windows now have really thin borders and all the title bars are white. The last update supposedly gave you the option to change the title bar color, but it only seems to color 1 pixel around the window that's in focus, so it's not super obvious. If you have lots of windows open it can sometimes be hard to tell what window is what if you want to change focus or change the size.

I don't like that to log in you have to hit a key, wait for the screen animation to complete, and then type your password. This is even more irritating since typically you have to wait for the monitor to wake up so you know when the screen animation has completed. This was a problem in 8/8.1 too. Prior to that, you hit any key to wake the monitor/stop the screensaver, and then can immediately start typing your password. You can bypass this by enabling the option that forces users to hit CTRL+ALT+DEL to login. You then have to hit that key combo to wake the monitor up, but at least you can start entering your password immediately.

There have been a couple of other nit picky things I've run across, but I can't remember them off the top of my head.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,917 Posts
been running windows since it started. now retired with a lot more time to hack around home computers.

Win 10 is better than the previous versions, but does have a lot of choices you need to make to semi safeguard your privacy and wireless logons. Having said that, my experience is it loads a lot faster. You can get into a lot of the old setups but expect to run into a lot of weird things till you finally hit gold. I think they attempted to be all things to all people and think the touch screen is the way to go. Which means to us old time PC users, getting the system to do what we want it to do is a lot harder than it used/should be.

My take is Microsoft is stopping updates after shorter and shorter time frames. which means if you want to use windows, might as well jump in and get started with Win 10

I have a relatively new hardware setup on my home desk and it runs Win 10. I use quite a bit of application software and most of it works best for me on Windows.

On the same desk is a older desktop setup that I cleaned off windows and installed Linux Ubuntu. For web surfing and basic stuff Ubuntu works well and it is free. Be prepared to rethink the interface as the Ubuntu Graphical User interface is not as user friendly as Windows and Apple in my opinion. Help is there but will take a lot of searches till you find answers. Linux command line is more technical than most will put up with.

Bottom line for me is Windows 10 is here to stay and for that reason I use it for applications.

Ubuntu is free and if you mainly surf or do office, photos, music etc = they are all free and do the job just fine.

If you had to upgrade hardware to make Win 10 run the way you want it to, just save that old CPU and install Ubuntu or some other Linux variant surf a lot faster, cheaper and safer than you do on your hi power Win 10.

Or do as my non techie wife does, buy a iPad and surf, email, swap photos from the kids/grandkids and do not put up with the problems Win 10 or Ubuntu bring to the table

These days no matter what you do, soon as you log on to the Web, every thing you do will be collected by more outfits than you can count, saved forever, analyzed out the yeng yang and your email in box will be filled to the max with loan offers, blue pills, free vacations etc etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,917 Posts
I checked this thread and re read my post.

Bottom line, windows 10 for me on two machines (desk top and laptop) seems to work pretty good and despite the attempt to convert every thing to touch screen, it is ok, not great but ok.

One thing that I encounter all the time is both machines seem to lock up for some back ground operation. Makes me wonder just how much is being sent 'home'.

Updates are automatic and rarely do I get one that does not screw something some where in the O/S after the update. I can do a command line system check and some times the system repairs ok. Right now one machine is not letting me do control operations. Have not found a solution and might have to restore the entire O/S from a back up. My opinion, Microsoft seems to want to be all things to all people and in so doing often screw up the experience for all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
One thing that I encounter all the time is both machines seem to lock up for some back ground operation.
It's probably something spiking you to 100% disk usage. Next time it happens check Task Manager to see if your disk is at 100%, and what process is doing it. If that doesn't point you in the right direction, Microsoft has some nice tools that help you track down problems, but they aren't easy to use for most people. I'd probably start with Windows Performance Recorder (WPR) and Analyzer (WPA) that are part of the Windows Performance Toolkit (WPT).
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top