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Discussion Starter #1
I am looking to start open white water boating, I have spent over 10 years in tripping canoes, but I want to step up to a saddle/float bag, whitewater only boat. I have good exp rafting/guiding and am currently looking at two (used) boats:

Mad river ME

Mohawk viper 12.

In my research it seems that the Mohawk has a tricky edge design that may be hard for learning. The other boat is longer, I think 14'. But its pretty dinged up. Any suggestions?
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks

thanks, I go about 185, from what I've read it seems that the Viper is the boat I'm best suited to.
Thanks again for the help and for directing me to cboats.
 

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Hey partner,

I would seriously consider a newer design! Think about 11 feet or less. 1 foot may not seem that significant, believe me, you will notice! Try not to get intimidated by chines. They can be difficult in the beginning, you'll work through it! My first OC1 was and Ocoee! I am glad that I chose a boat that was aggressive.

Do check on the Esquif boats. Yes, I am a bit bias, they are at the top of the game!
 

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I bought a Bell Ocoee this year as a first boat. It has been a humbling learning process, but well worth it. Getting strapped into an open playboat for the first time is going to feel crazy no matter what. Its kind of like riding a horse that knows it can throw you whenver it feels like it. The bonus of an Ocoee or one of the hard edged Esquif boats is that as you learn you won't have to get a new boat to play in. Also, the importance of accurate tilt is reinforced by the immidiate pummeling you will take when you make a mistake in a hard edged boat. Of the two you are looking at I would reccomend the Mohawk. Beware the location of the outfitting if you are buying a boat outfitted by/for someone else.
 

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The Ocoee edges will become very fun, if (when) you survive the learning curve.

Dolomite, what kind of water do you want to paddle? big, creekey, class, etc. I to have an Ocoee, but only use it it in bigger, deeper water these days. If you are looking at lower water, creeky, you don't want Royalex, they just don't hold up to rock bashing.
 

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Not many canoe manufacturers pushing new technology. In terms of traditonal looking open boats, Esquif has a material called Twintex that they use (not sure how durable) in a few boats. They also now make the Prelude in HPE.

Esquif also now owns and makes the Spanish Fly in HPE and the Taureau in a material they call T-Form Lite.

The newer Royalex does not seem to be near as good as the older Royalex. With the high cost of WW canoes, I have decided to no longer destroy my Royalex boats on creeky stuff. If you don't mind buying and fixing boats, then paddling a traditional Royalex open boat in creeky stuff is bad ass!
 

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Royalex sux. Get a plastic canoe or try a c1. Its way more fun to use a one bladed paddle and not fill up with water. Best of both worlds!
 

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I've paddled plastic decked boats more than open, but still had the most fun using an Ocoee in big water where ABS does just fine.
 

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...Shameless plug to sell my Taureau..

dolomite,
Am selling my Taureau, no outfitting, but not a scratch on the bottom..just a few light ones...listed in the Swap Section.
If you're over ~210 you might want to look to something else..check out the forums in:
http://www.cboats.net

SteveD
 
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