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I'm more artistic about it.... but have settled on 50% (2 to 1) flour to water ratio, a tablespoon of salt, and 1.5 tablespoons of yeast and a glug of olive oil. I use King Arthur bread flour (12-13% gluten). It comes out more like a NY style pie more the Napolitano style. That makes 4 doughs that are good for a ~12" pizza.

The no-knead recipe is nice since you just kinda mix it into a shaggy dough and stick it in a container to rise overnight and then just shape into balls and let rest for an hour the next day. I have nightmares of kneading sand into my pizza dough, so I'd either make it in advance or go no-knead on the river. The no-knead is a bit delicate and tears due to less gluten development but is still pretty good.

On my last trip last week I brought a dough I had made a few days before the trip instead of garlic bread, intending to make a focacia style bread stick thing to go with my Lasagna but it got too thin in the middle so it turned out to be more like a garlic and butter pizza. It got a little crispy in the middle and a bit overdone, but no one complained. I did it with a DO stack and probably left it on a bit too long. Oh well...live and learn.
 

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I have a 156r and it’s giant. If one this size was just the cook boat you’d have everything and more than one sink. One guy could easy have his camp stuff and still have a 120 cooler two giant boxes or 3 and bow and stern for bar propane egg pizza oven corn hole you name it! You can borrow it if you get a permit and test out my theory! Can you use a outboard on a raft as motor season or is that just for snout rigs? A snout kitchen would e off the hook. I know someone on gear had refrigeration and a ice maker lol!!! Now that’s some first world shite right there! Lol!!!
 

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I'm more artistic about it.... but have settled on 50% (2 to 1) flour to water ratio, a tablespoon of salt, and 1.5 tablespoons of yeast and a glug of olive oil. I use King Arthur bread flour (12-13% gluten). It comes out more like a NY style pie more the Napolitano style. That makes 4 doughs that are good for a ~12" pizza.

The no-knead recipe is nice since you just kinda mix it into a shaggy dough and stick it in a container to rise overnight and then just shape into balls and let rest for an hour the next day. I have nightmares of kneading sand into my pizza dough, so I'd either make it in advance or go no-knead on the river. The no-knead is a bit delicate and tears due to less gluten development but is still pretty good.

On my last trip last week I brought a dough I had made a few days before the trip instead of garlic bread, intending to make a focacia style bread stick thing to go with my Lasagna but it got too thin in the middle so it turned out to be more like a garlic and butter pizza. It got a little crispy in the middle and a bit overdone, but no one complained. I did it with a DO stack and probably left it on a bit too long. Oh well...live and learn.
50% easier to work with. 65% about where I like to be and I find if I can control the temps well, about 600-650 F gives me NY style, 700-800 F gives me napoletana. I do prefer a preferment either a biga or a poolish, and I do like to use only a small amount of yeast if possible to allow for a longer fermentation. I believe in a shoulder season around nights in 30's and days in 40's-70's it would be perfect. My flour tortillas are 56% hydration (23% butter, 2% salt), and are unleavened. I have been planning pizza for about 3 years now, have been beta testing, and getting ready to test at Christmas in Rhode Island outside (I am in Maine) and I will see how things go for 4 people and about 8 pies.
 

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I have a 156r and it’s giant. If one this size was just the cook boat you’d have everything and more than one sink. One guy could easy have his camp stuff and still have a 120 cooler two giant boxes or 3 and bow and stern for bar propane egg pizza oven corn hole you name it! You can borrow it if you get a permit and test out my theory! Can you use a outboard on a raft as motor season or is that just for snout rigs? A snout kitchen would e off the hook. I know someone on gear had refrigeration and a ice maker lol!!! Now that’s some first world shite right there! Lol!!!
My dream is a snout riff, JPW El Tigre tubes, panels of fiberglass over foam to make it almost like a sea worthy vessel in bays and along rivers like we have up here in Maine but also for the Grand Canyon, with boxes in which the coolers will sit with lids to have dual protection from the sun. Two coolers, likely Canyon 150s, although Engle and Yeti are on the table. Similar with semi dry storage using fiberglass, and pre-built with the unit on the bottom to prevent problems with the tubes and the eventual outboard when my shoulders give out and all I am doing is being the support boat for kayaks and folks who want gourmet during summer when we can motorize. Yes I have thought of the Engel fridge. No I have not come up with the correct solution for energy yet (I suspect wind is where it is really at). I want to be more organized with less weight to carry to the beach, and more compartmentalized with less rigging in the morning
 

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I have made pizza with a young woman who totally crushes it on her tailgate. 16” Ooni oven propane powered. She’s got her whole kit and even had a custom jacks plastic bag made for it with shoulder straps for ease of carrying. It’s fully river ready, though she’s not even a river woman… yet haha
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
You need a separate boat outfitted as a chuck wagon! I’ll row it and load and unload it for ya but can’t make two recipes and both are hit or miss. But seriously just outfitter a cheaper used boat as a chuck wagon and have a buddy row it and bobs your uncle. Can bring two of them pizza ovens !!
That is part of my inspiration. I do not want a complete chuck wagon, but holly mother of....This dude on the Gates of Lodore trip I did this summer brought an entire chuck wagon. The Kitchen Box "Aka Big Bertha" had 3 Dutch ovens even. But ANYTHING you wanted to cook he had a tool or piece of cookware. But throwing in a pizza oven would just be a fun addition if someone else is bringing the primary kitchen set up.
 

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That is part of my inspiration. I do not want a complete chuck wagon, but holly mother of....This dude on the Gates of Lodore trip I did this summer brought an entire chuck wagon. The Kitchen Box "Aka Big Bertha" had 3 Dutch ovens even. But ANYTHING you wanted to cook he had a tool or piece of cookware. But throwing in a pizza oven would just be a fun addition if someone else is bringing the primary kitchen set up.
I have done the tower of three, I personally have the 14" and the 12", and find that the 14" is perfect for monster desserts, and huge lasagnas for 16, that the 12" is perfect for rice for 16 (7 cups, 10.5 cups water). Wonder about the discada, am toying with wok cookery and feel this needs to be there as well. I don't like too much equipment (he says with forked tongue), and thus I need to have a blaster that can double as a wok stove (more stable). Also am wondering about the low budget 75000 BTU stove Backyard Pro 32" Double Burner Outdoor Range - 150,000 BTU (webstaurantstore.com) I can see rocking two woks on this as well as blasting and griddle work
 

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That stove would work great....... if it rode on your boat.......but it wouldn't fit on mine. 😁
I am not advocating anybody schlep my shit. I bring the gear, and need to have a way to organize it better to bring what I need to the beach and not all of it. I like my four burner Partner steel but performance has been spotty in the wind (yes I have the wind attachment) at times especially with my Partner steel griddle especially for tortillas for 16. Of course I stopped hashbrowns on the griddle as the DO is better, same with bacon and sausage (again my 14" GSI DO doesn't fit as well as I like on the Partner steel). Wondering about the discada and see a lot of this. Pizza oven will be for desserts too as I can use the residual heat as it cools, also reheat or heat some things as it warms. Still working that one out too
 

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Dang you guys are at a whole 'nother level--I'm consistently moving from "average gear load" to "do more with less". This thread started as "which pizza oven" works good (IMHO even when pizza isn't great it's still good) and you've delved into perfect dough recipes for ideal pizza. I'm both intimidated and impressed!

50% easier to work with. 65% about where I like to be and I find if I can control the temps well, about 600-650 F gives me NY style, 700-800 F gives me napoletana. I do prefer a preferment either a biga or a poolish, and I do like to use only a small amount of yeast if possible to allow for a longer fermentation. I believe in a shoulder season around nights in 30's and days in 40's-70's it would be perfect. My flour tortillas are 56% hydration (23% butter, 2% salt), and are unleavened. I have been planning pizza for about 3 years now, have been beta testing, and getting ready to test at Christmas in Rhode Island outside (I am in Maine) and I will see how things go for 4 people and about 8 pies.
OK, you're a nerd. Much respect!

I have done the tower of three, I personally have the 14" and the 12", and find that the 14" is perfect for monster desserts, and huge lasagnas for 16, that the 12" is perfect for rice for 16 (7 cups, 10.5 cups water). Wonder about the discada, am toying with wok cookery and feel this needs to be there as well. I don't like too much equipment (he says with forked tongue), and thus I need to have a blaster that can double as a wok stove (more stable). Also am wondering about the low budget 75000 BTU stove Backyard Pro 32" Double Burner Outdoor Range - 150,000 BTU (webstaurantstore.com) I can see rocking two woks on this as well as blasting and griddle work
I don't like those big flat top burners...you'd still need to add a wok ring to fit a disco or wok....BUT if you could justify it as a replacement for both your Partner and your blaster, it might be justifiable. A buddy of mine has a big 2-burner like that and I added a small center burner so they can perk coffee while the two large burners are busy with hashbrowns or eggs.

I am a disco geek. Maybe I can help? (or this might merit its own thread)
This is somewhat of a "standard" disco burner and has enough BTU's (and a pot support) so may be a good blaster replacement. I like kitchen equipment that has multiple functions/uses.

Also IMO others need to embrace the disco (in their menu selections and cooking techniques) to justify bringing it on a river trip. I love mine...it lives on my back deck and I use it most of the year..but I've never wanted to bring it on a river trip. It takes a lot of space and its own burner, and that doesn't justify me bringing it for one meal. But if it's used for a majority of meals, by all means! It's GREAT for most breakfasts-pancakes, bacon, eggs, sausage, hash browns, etc (except biscuits/DO type breads) and most Mexican-style river meals (fajitas, tacos, quesadillas, etc). Especially for tacos where you can brown your meat in the center and warm tortillas on the perimeter. Also good for Asian-inspired meals (stir fry, fried rice, soba noodles, etc).
 

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Dang you guys are at a whole 'nother level--I'm consistently moving from "average gear load" to "do more with less". This thread started as "which pizza oven" works good (IMHO even when pizza isn't great it's still good) and you've delved into perfect dough recipes for ideal pizza. I'm both intimidated and impressed!



OK, you're a nerd. Much respect!



I don't like those big flat top burners...you'd still need to add a wok ring to fit a disco or wok....BUT if you could justify it as a replacement for both your Partner and your blaster, it might be justifiable. A buddy of mine has a big 2-burner like that and I added a small center burner so they can perk coffee while the two large burners are busy with hashbrowns or eggs.

I am a disco geek. Maybe I can help? (or this might merit its own thread)
This is somewhat of a "standard" disco burner and has enough BTU's (and a pot support) so may be a good blaster replacement. I like kitchen equipment that has multiple functions/uses.

Also IMO others need to embrace the disco (in their menu selections and cooking techniques) to justify bringing it on a river trip. I love mine...it lives on my back deck and I use it most of the year..but I've never wanted to bring it on a river trip. It takes a lot of space and its own burner, and that doesn't justify me bringing it for one meal. But if it's used for a majority of meals, by all means! It's GREAT for most breakfasts-pancakes, bacon, eggs, sausage, hash browns, etc (except biscuits/DO type breads) and most Mexican-style river meals (fajitas, tacos, quesadillas, etc). Especially for tacos where you can brown your meat in the center and warm tortillas on the perimeter. Also good for Asian-inspired meals (stir fry, fried rice, soba noodles, etc).
I use the Stanley 2 gallon bomb method. Feeds 16 coffee drinkers. Pot of water to boil that will fit in 2 gallon bomb, dump in1 lb of percolator ground coffee, stir and steep for 4-4.5 minutes, strain into bomb. Stanley Adventure 2-Gallon Fast-Flow Water Jug - Hike & Camp (backcountry.com)
 

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What do you use for a strainer? I've also seen a similar system using coffee socks to steep the coffee

I have a 1.5gal enamelware percolator. Was Dad's from elk camp and is probably 40 years old and is now mine for river use. :)
I don't think it is this one, it is a bomber restaurant style one, and of course doubles as the strainer for the dishwashing, although we rinse in boiling hot water at the end and before straining Vollrath 10 1/4" Double Mesh Fine Wire Strainer with 9" Wood Handle 47193 (webstaurantstore.com)
 

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That would be sick. With the integrated oven, it would act somewhat like a rocket stove.

Riley stove also makes chimney ovens for the hot tent stove you may already own:
As I hijack further, OK, what size cabin style/tipi style, brand, and stove for real cooking, ability to sleep and have people huddling in for winter in the Grand Canyon?
 

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Wall tent, no question. Walls let you push the stove, kitchen, cots, etc up against the wall and be able to walk/stand in the middle.

Canvas wall tents are the best because they breathe. Canvas wall tents would be the worst for river trips since they'd suck up water like a sponge. If you coat them so they don't saturate, then they don't breathe..so may as well go nylon wall tent.

Something like this would seem to strike a balance between packability, ease of setup, room, etc:
But $1,300? low whistle
 
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