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Pizza is about the 4th post down.
 

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But in regards to doing it under a Pop Up.... Don't you want the heat UNDER the pizza? Seems like someone could fab up a SS origami dome to go OVER the pop up pit, and give a better result.
You're baking it, not frying it...but not broiling it, either. You want the majority of the heat to surround the pizza and you do want enough heat to crisp the crust on the bottom so it's not soggy... so you'd still probably do 8 briquettes under and 12-14 over in a dutchie.

or if you're really trying to cycle a bunch past your pop-up for a group... broil it under the pop-up and finish it on a stone/steel? (or vice versa?)
 

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Dang you guys are at a whole 'nother level--I'm consistently moving from "average gear load" to "do more with less". This thread started as "which pizza oven" works good (IMHO even when pizza isn't great it's still good) and you've delved into perfect dough recipes for ideal pizza. I'm both intimidated and impressed!

50% easier to work with. 65% about where I like to be and I find if I can control the temps well, about 600-650 F gives me NY style, 700-800 F gives me napoletana. I do prefer a preferment either a biga or a poolish, and I do like to use only a small amount of yeast if possible to allow for a longer fermentation. I believe in a shoulder season around nights in 30's and days in 40's-70's it would be perfect. My flour tortillas are 56% hydration (23% butter, 2% salt), and are unleavened. I have been planning pizza for about 3 years now, have been beta testing, and getting ready to test at Christmas in Rhode Island outside (I am in Maine) and I will see how things go for 4 people and about 8 pies.
OK, you're a nerd. Much respect!

I have done the tower of three, I personally have the 14" and the 12", and find that the 14" is perfect for monster desserts, and huge lasagnas for 16, that the 12" is perfect for rice for 16 (7 cups, 10.5 cups water). Wonder about the discada, am toying with wok cookery and feel this needs to be there as well. I don't like too much equipment (he says with forked tongue), and thus I need to have a blaster that can double as a wok stove (more stable). Also am wondering about the low budget 75000 BTU stove Backyard Pro 32" Double Burner Outdoor Range - 150,000 BTU (webstaurantstore.com) I can see rocking two woks on this as well as blasting and griddle work
I don't like those big flat top burners...you'd still need to add a wok ring to fit a disco or wok....BUT if you could justify it as a replacement for both your Partner and your blaster, it might be justifiable. A buddy of mine has a big 2-burner like that and I added a small center burner so they can perk coffee while the two large burners are busy with hashbrowns or eggs.

I am a disco geek. Maybe I can help? (or this might merit its own thread)
This is somewhat of a "standard" disco burner and has enough BTU's (and a pot support) so may be a good blaster replacement. I like kitchen equipment that has multiple functions/uses.

Also IMO others need to embrace the disco (in their menu selections and cooking techniques) to justify bringing it on a river trip. I love mine...it lives on my back deck and I use it most of the year..but I've never wanted to bring it on a river trip. It takes a lot of space and its own burner, and that doesn't justify me bringing it for one meal. But if it's used for a majority of meals, by all means! It's GREAT for most breakfasts-pancakes, bacon, eggs, sausage, hash browns, etc (except biscuits/DO type breads) and most Mexican-style river meals (fajitas, tacos, quesadillas, etc). Especially for tacos where you can brown your meat in the center and warm tortillas on the perimeter. Also good for Asian-inspired meals (stir fry, fried rice, soba noodles, etc).
 

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What do you use for a strainer? I've also seen a similar system using coffee socks to steep the coffee

I have a 1.5gal enamelware percolator. Was Dad's from elk camp and is probably 40 years old and is now mine for river use. :)
 

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Wall tent, no question. Walls let you push the stove, kitchen, cots, etc up against the wall and be able to walk/stand in the middle.

Canvas wall tents are the best because they breathe. Canvas wall tents would be the worst for river trips since they'd suck up water like a sponge. If you coat them so they don't saturate, then they don't breathe..so may as well go nylon wall tent.

Something like this would seem to strike a balance between packability, ease of setup, room, etc:
But $1,300? low whistle
 

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Kinda why I continue to think of various popup tent solutions with walls for caterings and for festivals, and recognizing I need proper ventilation, and to have a vestibule or one wall open to prevent carbon monoxide. I know that the mechanism to open it up will likely fail in sand, and I need to stake the hell out of it. 10'x20' Waterproof Pop Up Canopy Tent with Sides – The Display Outlet
We have a 10'x10'. You definitely get what you pay for. Buy the best one you can afford.
I've seen a 10'x20' at the Lochsa used as a hot tent. Pretty sweet. they set one end up over the campground picnic table and set their cots up in the other end.

Canvas Tents for Cold Weather Camping
ultimate light weight canvas!
I have a seek outside wall tent I might possibly sell ya( the court house) lol. Dm lol
Surprisingly light. ~20lb tent and ~13lb frame. Wouldn't backpack with it, but I assume it's small enough it could be packed in a Bills bag.
 

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I love my pie irons!
Mine are under-utilized. You should start a pie-iron thread. Would be cool to see how others use theirs.

I did make some pretty epic midnight drunk munchy Monte Cristos about 10 years ago while camped at the Lochsa. Made turkey, ham and cheese sammies, dunked in pancake batter, then grilled and dipped in huckleberry jam.
 
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