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Thinking about a Christmas gift for me...I mean my wife :) I saw that Solo Stove came out with a portable pizza oven and that got me thinking.. And then I starting looking and there are tons of them available! Oonie and Roccbox get good reviews. And it seems they are easier to use with better insulation then the Solo. And the Solo is a little small. ( it will take a ton of 12 inch pizzas to feed a big group) I want one you can add wood to obviously. But I wonder how hard some of these would be to pack on a boat? I know the solo would pack well, and I used a campfire unit each night on the grand. For those that say Dutch, I say this would be easier and pop out multiple pizzas of a useable size faster.
 

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Saw a group with one that had a pelican case for it. Don't know the model of the oven or case. Expensive, but doable.

We've made pizza in the Dutch oven before, it was good - but really challenging to get out of the bottom of the dutchie in one piece. And Impossible to feed a large group.
 

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Thinking about a Christmas gift for me...I mean my wife :) I saw that Solo Stove came out with a portable pizza oven and that got me thinking.. And then I starting looking and there are tons of them available! Oonie and Roccbox get good reviews. And it seems they are easier to use with better insulation then the Solo. And the Solo is a little small. ( it will take a ton of 12 inch pizzas to feed a big group) I want one you can add wood to obviously. But I wonder how hard some of these would be to pack on a boat? I know the solo would pack well, and I used a campfire unit each night on the grand. For those that say Dutch, I say this would be easier and pop out multiple pizzas of a useable size faster.
I am very pleased with my Gozney Roccbox. I think there are add ons that make it a bit better, such as the nice peel that has perforations and is small (easy to release from the peel), the turning peel breaks down and is useful as well, and the door when there is significant cold is also useful to retain heat. It does have to hang a bit over the back edge with the fire or the gas burner, but from the standpoint of its center of gravity it was designed to do so (needs to be level). Temperature gauge is accurate enough. Easy to overheat, but if you are going for pizza napoletana you just need to be vigilant and practiced as a pizzaiolo, or accept some burns. A bit too narrow from top to bottom to lift to the top to get a bit of extra heat on the ingredients, but I think the ingredients need to be ready and not raw anyway. Really does take about 30 minutes to reach a steady state no matter what, so it is not exactly conserving of propane, and although I plan to try wood fired on the river, I need to be ready for it to fail for whatever reason meal wise. Right now I am trying to either consider a dry bag made for it by JPW or consider what other solution I may need. I like the way the shipping box protects it.

edit: I note this makes a standard 10”-12” napoletana size pizza, perfect for a hungry 1 person (who may eat more), or nice for a buffet. I envision for a 16 person Grand Canyon group using the oven for flat breads too, and a production line where people choose three ingredients and put them in a bowl, one pizza maker and one pizzaiolo to crank out the product
 

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I have the Bertello brand, that hooks up to full size propane. I can make a pizza in 1:40 from raw dough. They are only about 6-8" round, if you go bigger it's far too difficult to maneuver. So you are making a slice of pizza every 2 minutes or so. On easy family floats, the entire thing fits in the Lowes/HD black and yellow boxes. I have cooked for 15 people, but the cook is making pizzas for a very long time, since each 'pizza' is so small.

Great treat on the river.
 

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I have the Bertello brand, that hooks up to full size propane. I can make a pizza in 1:40 from raw dough. They are only about 6-8" round, if you go bigger it's far too difficult to maneuver. So you are making a slice of pizza every 2 minutes or so. On easy family floats, the entire thing fits in the Lowes/HD black and yellow boxes. I have cooked for 15 people, but the cook is making pizzas for a very long time, since each 'pizza' is so small.

Great treat on the river.
Do you carry a proofing box for your doughs?Baker's Mark 18" x 26" x 3" White Heavy-Duty Polypropylene Dough Proofing Box
 

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I fully expect my comment to be ignored on this topic, but why not bring cold already cooked pizza? Eat cold straight from cooler. Or re-heat over open fire with utensil of choice or grill.

This has been my go-to on Gates of Lodore trips as of late. Order a full pizza in Steamboat, eat a slice or 2 for dinner, then package the rest for cold lunches on the rio.
 

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I fully expect my comment to be ignored on this topic, but why not bring cold already cooked pizza? Eat cold straight from cooler. Or re-heat over open fire with utensil of choice or grill.

This has been my go-to on Gates of Lodore trips as of late. Order a full pizza in Steamboat, eat a slice or 2 for dinner, then package the rest for cold lunches on the rio.
Not ignoring, in fact you bring up one of the best points. Whether it is a Boboli crust, whether it is a Chicago style DO riff or as you say, the professional pizza pieces packed perfectly (alliteration), all forms are viable options, perfect solutions, and with a makeshift lid such as a wok lid or upside down DO, can be reheated on a grill, etc. An oven is for the crazy MF who seem to think that true wok cookery and endless propane are reasonable, and those on the trip are willing to put up with it for bucatini all’Amatriciana on day 12 with 2 year aged Parmigiano reggiano and organic olive oil late harvest, who wants to add focaccia to the mix or who wants to make naan for Indian night
 

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I am a terrible cook and know jack shite BUT recently bought a second hand wood stove for a wall tent that came with a pretty big oven deal . Wonder if you could do something like that? Those pizza ovens are cool for sure you just gotta buy ine and take it really? In another thread guys talk about baking with a pop up pit by putting stuff under it too? I dunno lol but I was surprised by the oven for this stove. I’ll never use it iam to lazy lol! I love cold pizza! So that’s a great idea!!!
 

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I am a terrible cook and know jack shite BUT recently bought a second hand wood stove for a wall tent that came with a pretty big oven deal . Wonder if you could do something like that? Those pizza ovens are cool for sure you just gotta buy ine and take it really? In another thread guys talk about baking with a pop up pit by putting stuff under it too? I dunno lol but I was surprised by the oven for this stove. I’ll never use it iam to lazy lol! I love cold pizza! So that’s a great idea!!!
There are a number of solutions that use already common equipment (Cambridge Welding fire pit, Partner Steel stove). These are adaptations to a variety of heat sources for charcoal grills, and other propane fired things. I also beta tested using both my Partner Steel griddle with a wok lid and other lids as this seemed reasonable, and also hypothesized using those grill mats (thin non-stick coated metal) and building the pie on top of this making it easy for a noob to use a peel on a charcoal grill covered with a wok lid. Even worked on designs to fabricate as well, as they all seemed reasonable. This said, what is needed for mass flawless/failsafe production is a steady source of heat around 600-750 degrees Fahrenheit for about 1 hour. Therefore I have been focused on expanding the scope of use of this monotasker for pita, focaccia, naan, and even working on both savory and sweet galette recipes galette - Google Search
 

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Delicious!! Do it! These boats are so big, if I was going solo my boat could carry it all and goobs of propane and wouldn’t matter one bit lol!! Be nice to be on a trip with gourmet food!!!
Big issues I have been working on are start to finish 1 hour goal, 2 hour limit. Also ways to gourmet up breakfast but get off the beach in a timely fashion. Last one, I used stainless steel bento boxes three containers for lunch dishes that are keepers, Vietnamese grilled marinated chicken thigh and noodle salad, orecchiette pasta salad, baklava was beta tested and passed, Indian food with naan is a keeper, for some reason Portuguese kale soup was the favorite on the last visit but grilled lamb chops were not. Halibut poached in miso served with dried shiitakes was a good day 9 dish in the Grand Canyon as well. Late trip meals used more dried pasta, rice, beans that I made fresh with a pressure cooker, and prepared meats from Costco. Charcuterie appetizer is a winner, as is putting bread from the Wildlflower bakery in dry bags. I need to make more soups and expand beyond DO desserts. Wok cookery is on the next one, I did find DO breakfast fried rice was nice enough though, just not hot enough for the texture I want
 

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How about cooking pizza under your pop-up pit?
I argue it can be done. Question is reliable temps for duration for a larger group. Steel is just as good a surface as a firebrick type pizza surface in an oven and less fragile. For 4 people or appetizer I believe all the solutions are solid. Also the fast solutions listed by others just as solid and for folks who wouldn’t tolerate me rowing them the preferred solution
 

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I fully expect my comment to be ignored on this topic, but why not bring cold already cooked pizza? Eat cold straight from cooler. Or re-heat over open fire with utensil of choice or grill.

This has been my go-to on Gates of Lodore trips as of late. Order a full pizza in Steamboat, eat a slice or 2 for dinner, then package the rest for cold lunches on the rio.
A few years ago I was on a Middle Fork trip with several folks who had boated together for decades. Good people. I had boated with some of them for many years; others were old friends from their past since it was their permit.

On Day One, when we stopped for lunch, one of the team pulled a Subway sandwich from his cooler. That was his lunch. The other folks gave him a hard time about it. Day two, guess what he had for lunch. Yep. Same for days three through eight. He has a long tradition of stopping on the drive in and getting a whole bunch of sandwiches and calling it good. I was surprised they stayed edible that long. Well, some would suggest they're not totally edible when fresh, but I digress.

And my apologies for digressing from talking about pizza. Now I want pizza.
 

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I can attest the Ooni oven make a nice pizza, and has the temps to really crank them out quick. Also recently wondered about a bringing along a small pizza stone to place below my Pop-up Pit for making ala carte flatbread/naan type pizzas on the river. Not ashamed to admit I've used the age-old folding Coleman camping oven to do some light-duty (bread and biscuit) baking as well, which for the svelte design and price has performed pretty well.
 

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My daughter (11) gave me an Ooni Fyre 12 for my birthday this past year. It runs on pellets. It packs down to a reasonable size to bring on the river. Absurd, yes. Excessive, you bet. But designing and making your own flame kissed Neapolitan pizza on the river, is both fun and delicious.

I've only taken it on the river once and don't plan on making it a regular thing. It's best for smaller groups (say 10-12 or less). If you and your crew enjoy group fun in the kitchen, it could be a great addition to the kit. Kids love it.

P.S. Would I have bought this on my own? Not likely. But now that I have it...gonna use it.

 

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A few years ago I was on a Middle Fork trip with several folks who had boated together for decades. Good people. I had boated with some of them for many years; others were old friends from their past since it was their permit.

On Day One, when we stopped for lunch, one of the team pulled a Subway sandwich from his cooler. That was his lunch. The other folks gave him a hard time about it. Day two, guess what he had for lunch. Yep. Same for days three through eight. He has a long tradition of stopping on the drive in and getting a whole bunch of sandwiches and calling it good. I was surprised they stayed edible that long. Well, some would suggest they're not totally edible when fresh, but I digress.

And my apologies for digressing from talking about pizza. Now I want pizza.
No worries. I don’t want anybody to feel that my nose is turned up. I am simply telling what my passion is. I love the river and river people and understand I am a bit off
 

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How about cooking pizza under your pop-up pit?
I have one. Should try it. Hell, I might give it a go in my driveway! I bet it would work well for re-heating my Steamboat stop pizza too!

Not ignoring, in fact you bring up one of the best points. Whether it is a Boboli crust, whether it is a Chicago style DO riff or as you say, the professional pizza pieces packed perfectly (alliteration), all forms are viable options, perfect solutions, and with a makeshift lid such as a wok lid or upside down DO, can be reheated on a grill, etc. An oven is for the crazy MF who seem to think that true wok cookery and endless propane are reasonable, and those on the trip are willing to put up with it for bucatini all’Amatriciana on day 12 with 2 year aged Parmigiano reggiano and organic olive oil late harvest, who wants to add focaccia to the mix or who wants to make naan for Indian night
👆👆👆👆👆👆Sophistication level = higher than the average MtnBuzzard. And threw some alliteration in there too??? WHAT?

On Day One, when we stopped for lunch, one of the team pulled a Subway sandwich from his cooler. That was his lunch. The other folks gave him a hard time about it. Day two, guess what he had for lunch. Yep. Same for days three through eight. He has a long tradition of stopping on the drive in and getting a whole bunch of sandwiches and calling it good. I was surprised they stayed edible that long. Well, some would suggest they're not totally edible when fresh, but I digress.
How much is the average Subway sandwich? $8? 8 days X $8 = how much lunch meat, sliced cheese, and bread can I buy for that? Also Subway is barely food.
 
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