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Good day,
I have a 1995 Maravia New Wave I purchased used in 2000. It was used before me in Alaska as a guide boat.
I replaced the floor last year. We use the boat 2 to 3 times a year for week or less trips. The boat has never been folded as long as I've had it. The boat was always stored under tarps, in southern california. for the last year, its been in a garage.
How long will the boat go?
How do you know when the boat is too old?
Thanks
 

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Maravias don't like being rolled. I had a 1994-1995-ish Williwaw 2 I bought used in 2003 and rolled it every trip. I frequently had pinholes in the floor from all the rolling and unrolling.

Maravias that stay inflated/semi-inflated will last for YEARS.


Agree on the advice to wipe it with 303. Also store it out of the sun.
 

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I have a different pov. Your either at the end or beginning of the life cycle of a raft. I have learned for me, its best to be at the beginning. I bought new in 2000 and sold it in 2005 for almost what I paid for it and then got a new one for a $1000 bucks more. I repeat every 5 years. That averages out to $200 a year for a basically new boat with no real maintenance. No concerns about reliability. And always a sweet float. But that's just how I roll.
 

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I have a different pov. Your either at the end or beginning of the life cycle of a raft. I have learned for me, its best to be at the beginning. I bought new in 2000 and sold it in 2005 for almost what I paid for it and then got a new one for a $1000 bucks more. I repeat every 5 years. That averages out to $200 a year for a basically new boat with no real maintenance. No concerns about reliability. And always a sweet float. But that's just how I roll.
I dunno, this username doesn't seem to check out!? :p
 

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Maravia's weak points are the floors. Always has been. If you have a new floor, you are probably in good shape. I can't remember what valves they used during what years, but your next problem could be those weird maravia valves that they used to use and can't provide replacements for anymore. If those go bad, you'll need to replace with c7s which is will cost you between $100 and $500 depending on whether you do it yourself or not.

Then you'll know that the boat is at the end of it's life when the material itself is degraded. Lots of pin holes, delamination, and uv damage are all symptoms of degraded material. Aside from the advice presented above, repair the tubes with urethane when problem spots first show their face. The internal sealants don't last for long, but they can plug pinholes long enough to recoat with urethane, and that will keep pinholes at bay for a few years.
 

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Maravia's weak points are the floors. Always has been. If you have a new floor, you are probably in good shape. I can't remember what valves they used during what years, but your next problem could be those weird maravia valves that they used to use and can't provide replacements for anymore. If those go bad, you'll need to replace with c7s which is will cost you between $100 and $500 depending on whether you do it yourself or not.
Old maravia valves are a pain in the back side. However, you can replace them with new cheep plastic military valves from NRS. Just twist out the ADs and little silicone and screw the military valve right into the cup. I done it to a couple of boats. Not the best option but why spend the big bucks on good valves for an old boat? works...
 

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My first raft was a Maravia Santana II. It was "reconditioned" by Maravia which I thought was good. I should have suspected something when I received it and unrolled it and it had been christened "SPLAT" across it's bow by it's previous owner. I though it was likely a term of endearment but in a short time I found out it was an adjective.

Anyway, it was a early glue-up Maravia. They definitely had issues. In a short time, I had to carry an electric pump and a battery which almost resulted in a ticket on the MF Salmon in the 1980's for having a "mechanical assisted" mode of transportation in a wilderness area. Believe me, it was a very necessary assist. The first step onto the tubes in the morning resulted in sinking up to your knees in PVC and likely getting your feet wet.

During a cicada peak year when floating through Echo park on a quiet day we all commented and conversed about the drone of the cicada we heard even mid-river. Shortly, it was realized, by all on board, that that drone was emanating from below us from dozens of pin hole leaks. The drone of Splat was louder than the drone of the cicada.

Splat was the brunt of many cruel jokes but for a few years it transported a lot of gear. One good thing could be said about Splat, there was no way she was ever going to flip.

I gave Splat to a friend but his "Gee, thanks" seemed to ring hollow. I found out later that it went pretty directly to a land fill in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Bottom line, you are right not to roll it because that really stresses the seams on those old glued-up boats. I 303'ed Splat but I wondered if that weakened the glue. Since your boat was never rolled, I suspect 303'ing is for the better.
 

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Wow, GeoRon, your story makes me feel a >little< bit better about selling my old Maravia and buying an Aire.

I like the stiffness of the Aire, but miss the slick drop-stich Maravia floor. I just don't miss the pinholes.
 

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My first raft was a Maravia Santana II. It was "reconditioned" by Maravia which I thought was good. I should have suspected something when I received it and unrolled it and it had been christened "SPLAT" across it's bow by it's previous owner. I though it was likely a term of endearment but in a short time I found out it was an adjective.

Anyway, it was a early glue-up Maravia. They definitely had issues. In a short time, I had to carry an electric pump and a battery which almost resulted in a ticket on the MF Salmon in the 1980's for having a "mechanical assisted" mode of transportation in a wilderness area. Believe me, it was a very necessary assist. The first step onto the tubes in the morning resulted in sinking up to your knees in PVC and likely getting your feet wet.

During a cicada peak year when floating through Echo park on a quiet day we all commented and conversed about the drone of the cicada we heard even mid-river. Shortly, it was realized, by all on board, that that drone was emanating from below us from dozens of pin hole leaks. The drone of Splat was louder than the drone of the cicada.

Splat was the brunt of many cruel jokes but for a few years it transported a lot of gear. One good thing could be said about Splat, there was no way she was ever going to flip.

I gave Splat to a friend but his "Gee, thanks" seemed to ring hollow. I found out later that it went pretty directly to a land fill in the Roaring Fork Valley.

Bottom line, you are right not to roll it because that really stresses the seams on those old glued-up boats. I 303'ed Splat but I wondered if that weakened the glue. Since your boat was never rolled, I suspect 303'ing is for the better.



Those old glued maravias were lemons for sure, but the 1995 boat that the OP has is an entirely different beast, the problems the he will run into will probably be different than those that ended the life of Splat. The 95 boat should have been made with welded seams, and coated with polyurethane, which in my opinion, really extends the life of PVC.
 
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