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Discussion Starter #1
Two days ago I bought a pair of NRS Rogue Gloves. Yesterday I used them on a ~10 mile flat water float in an IK. After an hour or so my hands were soaked.

With one glove I had tucked the glove underneath the rubber gasket of my drysuit. The other glove's wrist covering was over the rubber gasket of my dry suit. On both hands I had the drysuit's neoprene cover over my wrist.

The air temps were ~50. Water temps were high 30s(?).

My hands were getting really cold, so I took my gloves off. My hands then warmed up - even though they were getting wet from paddle drippage.

Is this normal? I wasn't sure what to expect with water proof gloves - but I had thought that on flat water I would have been able to stay dry - or at least warmer than no gloves.

Thoughts? Input?
 

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Those are not waterproof gloves. They are made from nepoprene which is what wetsuits are made from. WETsuits. The idea behind a wetsuit and neoprene is that is gets wet, that water in the material stays there and your body warms up that water. It should be warmer than no gloves, though.
 

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The neoprene itself should be waterproof, but the seams and wrists are probably where the water will be coming in. Even if the gloves were totally water proof your hands would probably still be soaked after an hour or so of paddling because all your sweat would be building up in the gloves. I had a very thick pair of neoprene gloves that I used to wear and my hands were always very cold in them. I think this was because the gloves were pretty tight on my hands which did not allow good blood circulation. I now use pogies, and my hands are usually warm even on very cold days. Also, think about the rest of your body. If you are nice and warm in a drysuit your hands are probably going to be OK. If the rest of your body gets slightly chilled, your hands are going to be the first place where you will notice.
 

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The Rogue gloves have a special cuff that is supposed to prevent cold water from coming into the gloves too easily or too often, but nothing can prevent a little bit of wetness. Although I haven't tried this yet, I know paddlers who, even on the coldest days, prefer a very thin glove and pogies.
 

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maverick gloves

I bought the maverick gloves from nrs to take on the salt with me. they were totally dry, i was impressed. i had to switch them out for my hydroskin gloves because my hands were getting too hot. i put the cuff over my wrist gasket and then the outer cuff of my dry suit over that. i thought the rogue glove was supposed to be similar, if not a little better quality.
 

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I have had some similar problems. I too use an IK and dry warm hands are nice. I ended up going to a fishing store, and bought some gloves that are used for fishing, I guess. They are pretty thick, but I do not have a problem with it. They also tend to have a sticky grip, which is nice. I put both gloves under the cuffs of my dry top, and I have never had wet cold hands. Another thing about these fishing gloves are that they are cheap.
 

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I picked up the NRS Maverick's from CKS and used em for a week in California. I put them on and then put my wrist gaskets from my dry top over them. The only moisture inside was from my hands perspiration. They were a lil small in size, I had to get the XL's. I was def impressed though.
 

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I have the NRS reactor gloves which work well for me. They aren't "water proof" but my hands were never cold when I paddled a little in January. They have a snug fitting wrist and a velcro strap to add to the "water resistance." They are really grippy and not cumbersome either - pogies always throw me off - I've just never been able to feel comfortable with them.
Seems like pulling your gaskets over your gloves would be quite a task...I would worry about tearing them - Did it stay? I don't think you would feel like you needed to that with the reactors but wouldn't do it anyway because of the velcro.
Hope you find something that works better for you!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
after reading all these posts i went home and checked the packaging, and yes, it does say waterproof on the back. it even mentions how the seems are special in that they are sealed to be waterproof or something like that.

also, further research on the web led me to believe that neoprene is indeed waterproof. the reason wetsuits are wet is because they have no gasket. there are plenty of waterproof, neoprene fishing waders.

i really can't imagine that my hands were as wet at they were from perspiration. i imagine soaking these in a sink full of cold water would answer the leaking question. i would obviously keep the cuff out of the water.

thanks for all the great input. i think i'm going to snag some pogies. i have a few cold whitewater trips coming up, and these gloves sure don't seem work for me.
 

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You can test the waterproofness easily - just fill the glove with water and see if any leaks out. If the gloves are leaking send 'em back to NRS and get a new pair.
 

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I don't think you should expect neoprene gloves to be totally dry inside. As someone noted, the seams and wrist will likely leak some water. The main thing is you shouldn't have massive leaks where lots of water is flushing through the glove. The idea behind the neoprene gloves is to keep the water against your skin warm. Like ednaout (what does that mean anyway?), I've found the NRS Reactor gloves to be quite warm. I think they're 3.5mm thick. 2mm thick gloves provide a lot less warmth. I find the ranking of warmth from least warm to most warm to go like this:
2mm gloves, poggies, 3.5mm gloves. I have all 3 and what I use depends on the water temperature and type of boating I'm doing, but usually it's poggies.

If your hands are warmer without the gloves on, something is f'ed up! Maybe they're too tight and cutting off your circulation. Good luck keeping those hands warm.
 
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