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Interesting that they use an ammo can when they of all people could as easily build something. At $1,450 it could be in a new Pelican case or they could build an aluminum box.
The model I have IS in a Pelican case, with a solar panel. They likely would build you anything you want though, the rocket box model was primarily intended from what I got, for the commercial companies that run the big gear / sweep boats such as you seen in Grand Canyon and the middle fork. For the commercials, durability is more important than weight. Not that the Pelican case is light, weighs about as much as a full 5 gallon can of water, but for the "push a button and clean clear UV disinfected water flows" convenience, I'm OK with it.
 
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Who is doing just a particulate filtration vs chemical disinfection?

We have a couple spring fed Public Water Systems at work. One regularly tests present for total coliform but absent for fecal coliform. The other regularly tests absent for both. The one that is TC+ FC- we run through a particulate filter, UV filter, and do a chlorine injection. The two that are TC- FC- we do not treat other than the particulate filter.

Considering we're not sending in bacti samples from the river, if I'm pumping water vs taking it from a known potable source, I will probably do a small dosage of chlorine to disinfect the water. Iodine tastes worse and is more expensive. Boiling is time and energy consuming.

General guidelines are 0.5 - 1.0 teaspoon of chlorine per 5 gallons of water. Bleach must be unscented with no other additives. If it has a NSF 60 label on the bottle you're good to go. Clorox doesn't put it on the label but it is NSF 60 approved as long as it's regular chrlorine bleach with no additives.

If you're really curious about how much chlorine you've added and if it's safe to drink, get a DPD residual test kit. Your residual should be between 0.2 - 3.0 mg/L (ppm). 4.0 is the upper limit and when a PWS has to notify users that there is a toxic level of chlorine in the water. Most municipal PWSs treat their water to 1.0-1.5 ppm. There is a slight chlorine smell at this concentration. We try to keep ours at 0.3 - 0.5 ppm.
 
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