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I'm wondering if anyone has any water filtration system recommendations that they'd be willing to share with me.

I conducted a quick search on the buzz and came up empty-handed, and my other sources of knowledge on the subject are all focused on hiking rather than rafting. I can't image how much effort it would take to fill multiple five-gallon jugs with one of those camping hand pumps. The gravity fed systems I've discovered are all very little, 2-4 litres, and from what I've read, they don't appear to manage silt well, so the Colorado is out.
The person who got me into rafting has a wonderful system, but it's extremely customised and was built by an old river rat who no longer makes systems.

Is there any great outfitter I'm not aware of that produces a large capacity, silt tolerance, gravity fed filtration system that anyone can recommend?

Thank you ahead of time!
 

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Good info here.

 

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Here is the one that historically has been the rafting go to for long floats.


Way back in the '90's I first saw and used these things. A friend purchased one and if memory correct it was 7 or 8 hundred bucks. others in the group (my self included) thought it was over priced. But, it works and does not wear out.

Looks like the price has doubled since then.

My experience is this model is built with quality and the filters can be cleaned. If you settle the gunk out, it will produce jerry cans of filtered water in short periods of time.

sure wish I had purchased one back then.
 

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Sawyer sells a 5 gallon bucket system. You provide the buckets. We get two going at once with 4 or more buckets to settle the water in with Alum. With clear water you can filter 10 gallons in about 45 minutes if you keep topping off the 5 gallon buckets. What I need to figure out is how to pressurize the bucket with a raft pump. Balloon maybe? Ideas anyone?
 

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Second for the partner system!! Best money can buy, as electric mayhem says, buy once, cry once..
 

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Water wizard for silt, then Vital gravity filter
then finish with the liquid aquamira if you want.

There's a couple gravity filters in the DIY thread, essentially making the Vital one if you want from scratch. I get a few buckets going with the wizard, wait a bit, and the pour each one off in the intake bucket for the filter, it comes with the bulkhead fitting. flow rate is pretty decent, like a half gallon a minute. as was mentioned, no filter can handle silt, you either gotta wizard/alum/settle, or have a large micron pre-filter that you can change out a lot for very silty water, then follow that up with your main filter. if you get nice clear water from a side creek (eg rock creek), then the aquamira alone works great.
 

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I have the Katadyn Base Camp 10l gravity filter and it works for my needs. Fills a 5 gallon jug in two fills of the filter bag and takes maybe 10-15 minutes. Definitely will have issues with sedimented water but basically all filters will. The Katadyn Expedition is nice but its big, heavy and expensive. Nice that you can clean the filter though.

I've liked having the battery powered filters on every trip they've been on. Partner one is great and works out of the box. I'd rather spend money on that then the Katadyn Expedition personally. You can definitely piece meal a similar system together and do it yourself for a little cheaper but its kind of fiddly. My buddy Jesse did that, but he's pretty handy. I think his pumps even faster then the Partner one. He brought it on my last GC trip and it worked super nice. We pretty much could fill all the jugs on the trip up in less then a half hour which is pretty amazing.
 

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I'm wondering if anyone has any water filtration system recommendations that they'd be willing to share with me.
I have a gravity-fed ceramic cartridge filter that continues to work fine after twenty-five years (or more). It uses a water bag that hangs from a tripod of oars, and a ceramic cartridge housed in a thick plastic cannister. It came from Cascade Equipment in Eugene OR. I think they became Cascade Outfitters when they moved to Boise.
 

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Sawyer sells a 5 gallon bucket system. You provide the buckets. We get two going at once with 4 or more buckets to settle the water in with Alum. With clear water you can filter 10 gallons in about 45 minutes if you keep topping off the 5 gallon buckets. What I need to figure out is how to pressurize the bucket with a raft pump. Balloon maybe? Ideas anyone?
How about putting a gamma seal lid on the top, drill a hole and put a fitting on it that would accept the end of your raft pump? A person could even put a check valve in there so that the bucket held pressure. Spin the lid off to fill it or clean it, spin it on and pressurize it..
 
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The Utah offering looks like a heavier larger copy of the partner.. would be interested in seeing what sort of filters they use, looks squatter than a standard filter housing that uses the off the shelf filters, but the price is about half.. Battery life seems short compared to the partner though, but I can't say I actually timed my battery life, but it filters water for 16 folks on a 21 day grand trip and has juice to spare...
 

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Sawyer sells a 5 gallon bucket system. You provide the buckets. We get two going at once with 4 or more buckets to settle the water in with Alum. With clear water you can filter 10 gallons in about 45 minutes if you keep topping off the 5 gallon buckets. What I need to figure out is how to pressurize the bucket with a raft pump. Balloon maybe? Ideas anyone?
You can use a heavy duty water jug for the pressure tank, like the Septor brand ones. I bought a spare top and added some off he shelf air and water fittings. It runs a small bar style faucet (running water in camp and on the boat!)
It will hold over 100 psi. The system works best with 3/4 or less full, leaving the rest of the volume for air. Fill too much and you run out of air quickly. Now I just need to rig a way to charge it with a CO2 soda cartridge.
 

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I'm wondering if anyone has any water filtration system recommendations that they'd be willing to share with me.

I conducted a quick search on the buzz and came up empty-handed, and my other sources of knowledge on the subject are all focused on hiking rather than rafting. I can't image how much effort it would take to fill multiple five-gallon jugs with one of those camping hand pumps. The gravity fed systems I've discovered are all very little, 2-4 litres, and from what I've read, they don't appear to manage silt well, so the Colorado is out.
The person who got me into rafting has a wonderful system, but it's extremely customised and was built by an old river rat who no longer makes systems.

Is there any great outfitter I'm not aware of that produces a large capacity, silt tolerance, gravity fed filtration system that anyone can recommend?

Thank you ahead of time!
Vital Water Products

I use one like this that I built from off the shelf parts for about 1/2 the cost.It uses a ceramic filter elements with a replaceable .35 micron pre filter. Yield is about a gallon per minute. I use a 22 amp hour AGM battery and it lasts for 23 day Grand Canyon trips. It is like the ones that the Grand Canyon outfitters and logistic companies use and rent. It does require cleaning the ceramic filter "candles" about every 50 gallons or so for maximum yield.. As per NPS suggestions we add 2 drops of Clorox per gallon of filtered water for virus protection and settle or use water wizard to clear silty water before filtering. Our group also has a Partner filter with UV final purification that we sometime use and both seem to work equally well as we have never had any water borne illnesses over many Grand Canyon trips. One thing to keep in mind with UV is that the tubes can burn out so it is a good idea to carry a spare. I also carry a spare pump and two or three replacement ceramic filter elements. Any of these filters need to be drained if you encounter freezing temps as the elements will fracture if left full of water. We carry an expedition Katdyne as a back up but haven't needed it since switching to electric filters about 7 years years ago. Easier to get people to filter if you don't have to pump. Get a system to keep the buckets coming and sit in a chair with a drink and enjoy the evening.
 

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Katadyn Gravity BeFree Water Filtration System

I love it. Works great, had it 3+ years with no issues, rolls up very small into its' own pouch. For 2 people we used the 3L size for a week long rafting trip and it was excellent. Fill it, hang it, let it fill your water jugs. The 3L is small enough to carry hiking as well, but they make larger sizes if you need it.
 

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How about putting a gamma seal lid on the top, drill a hole and put a fitting on it that would accept the end of your raft pump? A person could even put a check valve in there so that the bucket held pressure. Spin the lid off to fill it or clean it, spin it on and pressurize it..
I'm thinking along these same lines. Gamma seal lid and C7 valve. I'm going to try fastening a barbed fitting on the lid to mount a heavy duty ballon on. Pump up the balloon with a boat pump and let the balloon air pressure help push the water through the filter. I'll report back if it works.
 

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As an aside, I always put the Clorox, or bleach if you will in the unfiltered water, and let it sit and have contact with the water for at least three or four minutes if I'm filtering from a side stream and overnight if I'm filtering from the river. Then I run it through the water filter with the carbon filters in it and it takes the chlorine taste, what little there is, completely out of the water... Just saying... I don't like the thought of running possibly contaminated water through the filter at all, if I don't have to. I know, it just goes through the pre-filter and the pump before it hits the UV, but why have it in there in the first place?
 
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I wrote this post with some general info. And while didn't prescribe any perfect systems, it gives you some detailed info to perhaps better inform your decisions. The basics of creating clean water suitable for drinking are 1) flocculate, 2) filter, and 3) sterilize. There is no water treatment system that does all this for you, and there are trade-offs intrinsic to the method (gravity vs. pressure, etc). But regarding that last crucial step you can chose between either chemical disinfection (bleach) or a photolysis (UV), but consider it necessary (esp these days) to kill viruses and some permitted rivers like the GC require it as well.

If you've got a bit of gumption and want to save some cash, a DIY setup can be built out of largely store bought components from Home Depot and Petsmart. Perhaps this winter I will write a post about how exactly to build one, since I think it's important to rather understand how this all works rather than rely on a black box system or anecdotal advice.
 

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Upacreek, thanks for putting up that link to your previous post. That is an excellent discussion of the principles of flocculation, filtration, and final treatment of water. Anyone who boats and is involved in water supply should read it. I agree with your point of bringing your water supply, particularly on some of the southwestern rivers, and not being dependent on the river water that is of relatively low quality due to the levels of dissolved solids. Here is a rather lengthy discussion of that issue:

2017 Review - FINAL.pdf (coloradoriversalinity.org) look at the map on page 8.

water in the Grand Canyon is in the 500-600ppm range. That is fairly hard water. I have gone to the approach of using water from a public supply system for drinking and food prep, and using flocced, filtered, and treated water for dishes and hand washing. It is quite possible to make your water last for over a week using this approach.

One other point that needs to be made is that clean water is only one part of making sure people don't get sick. Personal sanitation and food sanitation are just as important. A lot of times people assume that someone got sick due to poorly treated water when in fact the cause is more likely to be a lack of sanitation or really poor food preparation practices. There needs to be a lot more attention paid to these areas by boaters. I have seen more cases of poor practices in these areas over the years than I care to admit. some of it is a lack of knowledge, and some of it is due to doing stuff that they have gotten away with at home.
 

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As an aside, I always put the Clorox, or bleach if you will in the unfiltered water...

I would avoid chlorine in unfiltered water. Chlorine reacts with organic matter and creates "disinfection by-products" (DBPs). THMs and HAA5s. Nasty stuff. Here's an EPA link for some quick info. Disinfection By-Products | The Safe Water System | CDC

Upacreek and KrisG has it right: floculation-Sedimentation-Disinfection.
I operate public drinking water systems and forming DBPs are to be avoided.
I have been able to stick with just filtration so far in my outdoor adventures. lots of respect for those using alum and such... Those folks, that hopefully, know what they're doing, are removing organic matter prior to disinfection.

I'm not trying to be an authority here, just want to encourage those considering advanced treatment (anything beyond standard filtration) to be knowledgeable, trained. Treating drinking water with alum (Aluminum Sulphate) requires higher operator licensing in public drinking water systems. Aluminum ain't good for you either!
 
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