Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i searched first ... didn't see this posted elsewhere and wanted to share.

New online exhibit showcases famous canyon maps

It’s the night of Sept. 13, 1923. Ten men are deep in the Grand Canyon. Their expedition — to map the river corridor — marks the end of the era of exploration in the canyon.

But that night the river is trying to end them.

Unseen upstream rains cause a surprise flood. All night long, the river climbs. The men scramble in the darkness, tripping over rocks, repeatedly moving their gear and boats to higher ground.

The river doesn’t stop. It rises 14 feet in one night. After daybreak, it rises another 7 feet. Unbeknownst to the men, the outside world thinks they are dead.

The water flow rate has risen from 10,000 cubic feet per second to 125,000 cubic feet per second. In 2021, with Glen Canyon Dam controlling the river, typical flows are around 13,000 to 17,000 cubic feet per second. A 30,000 cubic feet per second flow is sporty. You’d better know what you’re doing on the water.

But to witness a flow of 125,000 cubic feet per second is to stare into the face of God.

The party waits three days, miserably crouched amongst boulders high up on a slope, before water levels drop to the point where their survey point is exposed again and they can continue work. When they arrive at Diamond Creek, long overdue, someone brandishes a newspaper. "HOPE NOT GIVEN UP FOR RIVER PARTY!" the headline thunders.

The nation hadn’t forgotten them. And, almost a century later, their work is still remembered.

Arizona State University Library’s Map and Geospatial Hub has just unveiled a dynamic multimedia exhibit describing, explaining and celebrating a historic collection of maps and charts of multiple Colorado River surveys conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey between 1902 and 1923.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,900 Posts
i searched first ... didn't see this posted elsewhere and wanted to share.

New online exhibit showcases famous canyon maps

It’s the night of Sept. 13, 1923. Ten men are deep in the Grand Canyon. Their expedition — to map the river corridor — marks the end of the era of exploration in the canyon.

But that night the river is trying to end them.

Unseen upstream rains cause a surprise flood. All night long, the river climbs. The men scramble in the darkness, tripping over rocks, repeatedly moving their gear and boats to higher ground.

The river doesn’t stop. It rises 14 feet in one night. After daybreak, it rises another 7 feet. Unbeknownst to the men, the outside world thinks they are dead.

The water flow rate has risen from 10,000 cubic feet per second to 125,000 cubic feet per second. In 2021, with Glen Canyon Dam controlling the river, typical flows are around 13,000 to 17,000 cubic feet per second. A 30,000 cubic feet per second flow is sporty. You’d better know what you’re doing on the water.

But to witness a flow of 125,000 cubic feet per second is to stare into the face of God.

The party waits three days, miserably crouched amongst boulders high up on a slope, before water levels drop to the point where their survey point is exposed again and they can continue work. When they arrive at Diamond Creek, long overdue, someone brandishes a newspaper. "HOPE NOT GIVEN UP FOR RIVER PARTY!" the headline thunders.

The nation hadn’t forgotten them. And, almost a century later, their work is still remembered.

Arizona State University Library’s Map and Geospatial Hub has just unveiled a dynamic multimedia exhibit describing, explaining and celebrating a historic collection of maps and charts of multiple Colorado River surveys conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey between 1902 and 1923.
ASU had a REALLY good online conference on Mapping the GC a little over a year ago.
Some of the videos are still archived if you Google it. I had the link bookmarked, but the links kept shifting.

Edit:
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top