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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any paddlers or skiers out there having trouble with contact lenses, glasses or goggles? There is a newer and better option than LASIK available right now. Orthokeratology, also known as Ortho-K is a nonsurgical way to correct your nearsightedness and astigmatism while sleeping. This is no joke. This procedure is FDA approved for people of all ages and safer and less expensive than LASIK.

What happens is your eye doctor fits you for retainer lenses that you wear only while you sleep. You put them on just before bed and remove them as soon as you wake up. In just a few days you have perfect vision all day long. It costs about 1/3 the price of LASIK and works just as well. To find out more about it in the Denver area, go to www.geteyeshapers.com. I know a bunch of active people who have done this and love it. A few months ago I saw a news story on it in Denver and the same guy was just featured in the Rocky Mountain News last week. Anyone having eye problems on the water should check this out.
 

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How come they only do correction for near sightedness. They have several options for near sightedness, but none for those of us with the farsightedness. Whats up with that?
 

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From the website:

Patients with up to 6.00 diopters of nearsightedness with or without moderate astigmatism and up to 3.00 diopters of farsightedness with or without astigmatism. Also, this treatment is FDA approved for people of all ages, so children make excellent candidates due to their active lifestyles. Prior to the fitting process, you will need to undergo a comprehensive eye examination to ensure your eyes are healthy and there are no medical issues that would make overnight corneal reshaping a poor choice for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Actually Ortho-K and LASIK can treat mild amounts of farsightedness. The issue revolves around the fact that the cornea is shaped like a dome. This "dome" is responsible for focusing 2/3 of all light entering the eye. A small change made to the cornea goes a long way. It is much easier to flatten that type of shape, which treats nearsightedness, than it is to steepen it, which is necessary to treat farsightedness, also called hyperopia. For both procedures, flattening the cornea is much simpler than steepening it. If you would like a more in-depth explanation, feel free to send me an email.

I hope this helps.
 
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