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My climber friend is retiring one of his ropes. Don't know the exact length, but it's very long. It is completely fine, just old and frayed enough for him to not want to trust it anymore in the event of a fall.

Are there any good uses for all or any of it? I was thinking safety/rescue related but anything else too. Willing to cut it up


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My climber friend is retiring one of his ropes. Don't know the exact length, but it's very long. It is completely fine, just old and frayed enough for him to not want to trust it anymore in the event of a fall.

Are there any good uses for all or any of it? I was thinking safety/rescue related but anything else too. Willing to cut it up


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Donate it to my friend who is building out a ropes course and needs some more rope to make a rope ladder for the neighborhood kids :)

I wouldn't use it for a rescue rope or any dynamic load.
 

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We use an old climbing rope to anchor our raft at camp - kinda handy when the closest usable tree is nowhere near the water and sand stakes aren't an option.


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Bowline(s). If it is a full 160' that is an impractical length for your primary line. As mentioned you could use it for the occasional or even common times when the nearest tie off is not right on the beach. You could also cut it into 50 and 100 foot lengths for use as primary and secondary lines.
 

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Retired means retired. Throw it out.
 

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So, there's going to be a lot of different reply's to this. Anywhere from throw it out to it's fine for non-critical use.
My opinion is it's fine for non-critical use, e.g. tying up a boat, etc. Even though it's not suitable any more for the extreme use of fall prevention it still has plenty of strength for not so extreme use.

My next question is, how often does everyone replace their throw-bag ropes?
REI suggests replacing climbing ropes every 1 to 5 years (depending on use)
(Climbing Rope Care)
Another study shows that dirty ropes can loose up to 40% of their strength
(A new study tests the strength of soiled climbing ropes | Climbing)
I replace my climbing rope every 5 years (I'm not a very active of a climber)
but I know people who have had the same throw-rope for more than that.

How often do you replace your throw-rope?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So, there's going to be a lot of different reply's to this. Anywhere from throw it out to it's fine for non-critical use.
My opinion is it's fine for non-critical use, e.g. tying up a boat, etc. Even though it's not suitable any more for the extreme use of fall prevention it still has plenty of strength for not so extreme use.

My next question is, how often does everyone replace their throw-bag ropes?
REI suggests replacing climbing ropes every 1 to 5 years (depending on use)
(Climbing Rope Care)
Another study shows that dirty ropes can loose up to 40% of their strength
(A new study tests the strength of soiled climbing ropes | Climbing)
I replace my climbing rope every 5 years (I'm not a very active of a climber)
but I know people who have had the same throw-rope for more than that.

How often do you replace your throw-rope?
That's a very good question. I bet many people have had them for well over 5 years.

I would bet a dynamic rock climbing rope starts out stronger than a whitewater rescue rope. So in its weakened, old state, its probably just as strong and a new or used rescue rope. Not to mention it would be absolutely ridiculous to stuff a large diameter rope like that inside a throw bag. This is one of those monster diameter ropes I'm talking about. It wouldn't be feasible to stuff it inside your kayak to have on the go, but having it for tie downs on a raft trip or something is a good idea.

Are you retired means retired people going to tell me to retire my helmet because it has some scratches on it too?
 

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Bowline(s). If it is a full 160' that is an impractical length for your primary line. As mentioned you could use it for the occasional or even common times when the nearest tie off is not right on the beach. You could also cut it into 50 and 100 foot lengths for use as primary and secondary lines.
Agreed. I retired my rope as I don't trust it for extreme events (climber falls), but I cut out a ~70' for a stern line and am not worried about the relatively low stress it will undergo securing a raft to shore.


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Old climbing rope can be cut into shorter lengths and used for horse training leads or dog leashes.


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Bow line, stern line, grab lines.
Use it to sling food in bear country, overkill but cool for rigging tarps or clotheslines.

I wouldn't use it for a rescue line--it doesn't float.
 

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Okay. It's old climbing rope. It's frayed, it's dirty, it's been used hard and put away wet a few times. You don't want to trust your life to it anymore.

It's still good rope. Lots of possibilities here. Specially if it's free. Or, you know, for a few beers you'd give your buddy anyway, cause he's your buddy.

For a bow or stern line
A perimeter line
To tie stuff to/in your boat
To make a cargo net
To hang stuff in your garage
For your drag bag
To hang stuff in trees in camp
To anchor your oars in the sand for the volley ball net

And in a pinch, to make a tree swing
 
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