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I cant be the only one wanting to lighten their boat. Coolers are useless, partner stoves are junk. Poop tubes, and freezedried meals is where this sport should be heading!

In all seriousness I am curious if anyone is out there running minimalist style. I suppose this may be more geared towards people with small cats but I want to hear your ideas! How you rig, what you cook, and what you carry (or lack there of). Is anyone out there packing 5 day trips into a 60L drybag?
 

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My first 2 years of running whitewater was alone in my JPW Cuthroat and I used a small action packer that I sealed with a glued on gasket and a 40L dry bag. I did carry one of those bucket toliets as it was affordable and I didn't know poop tubes where legal.

Food was whatever I wanted backpacking style as I had no cooler. The options are endless, especially if you have a dehydrator yourself. I wasn't a foodie back then so I just used whatever was available at local stores. Used a whisper light at the time but can't stand them now.

Ran the San Juan, the Dolores, Westwater (w/ friends), etc. Didn't last long with that setup as I was able to upgrade to an Ocelot. Would still be good for late season middle fork, maybe the Selway with the right crew, Deso. Debated Cat but would not want to row that on the lake as it wouldn't track as well as bigger boats.

Phillip
 

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n all seriousness I am curious if anyone is out there running minimalist style. I suppose this may be more geared towards people with small cats but I want to hear your ideas! How you rig, what you cook, and what you carry (or lack there of). Is anyone out there packing 5 day trips into a 60L drybag?
Oh hey I think I got forwarded a message from st2eelpot from you. yeah anyway I have a sabertooth frameless cat that I actually run with a light raft frame. I can take all my stuff plus a pvc poop tube for a multi-day trip. this is pretty handy when you think you might need to carry the boat. for small groups of kayakers I can carry an oil pan/firepan and a 2 burner partner with a 5lb propane plus some booze. You can also go backpack stove style. good rivers for this setup are jarbidge/bruneau, owyhee, south fork salmon, upper animas, low water sewlay, etc.

for really light trips take a look at that new packraft. you could hike for days and then fire up some cool stuff.
 

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I totally agree with the coolerless trips, and simple set-ups. Would rather spend less time in the kitchen and more time on the water and hikes. I've seen way to many mornings where rigging can take hours. Lighten the load and have more free time!
 

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this is my super light firepan setup for those trips where you must have a firepan even though you won't use it and they are only $10.
 

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I do double duty with my hand wash station serving as a dish washing station, good for small group 2-3 with minimal dishes etc.

I carry an eco safe tank with footman belt loops mounted on top of tank with leak proof bolts and washers. Than I do not carry a rocket box for it just a strap to carry it with. It is a little less stable when in use but with a little care no problem. loops make it easy to tie in boat.

http://www.rei.com/product/777772/rei-bug-hut-pro-2-tent#descriptionTab
under 2 lbs

http://www.rei.com/product/870757/rei-camp-bed-35-self-inflating-sleeping-pad#specsTab
4 lbs 9 ozs.

http://www.stupidguidetricks.com/Cooking%20Pages/firepan.html
9 lbs

light beer of course
 

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I totally agree with the coolerless trips, and simple set-ups. Would rather spend less time in the kitchen and more time on the water and hikes. I've seen way to many mornings where rigging can take hours. Lighten the load and have more free time!
Here here! So many things you can leave behind and not miss. If you think of it as backpacking with ability to easily carry a ton of gear it is a great way to go.
 

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,.... and simple set-ups. Would rather spend less time in the kitchen and more time on the water and hikes. I've seen way to many mornings where rigging can take hours. Lighten the load and have more free time!
Yeah, I've never found a direct link that carrying and dealing with more gear/crap equals a more enjoyable trip, as well.

bighorn, I think you get DQ'd for even having hand washing/ dish stations.;)

And really once you go backpack style with a few light extras like crazy creeks and a lightweight rain tarp(only set up when it's actually raining,snowing, of course) the number of days is nearly irrelevant. 2 days vs 14 days hardly matters in a raft. An extra 10-20 lbs in food? big deal.
 

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Always bringing the kitchen sink

I have been wanting to lighten up the load for years! I worked commercially for a number of years and my company never had a sweep boat, so all the gear would inevitably end up on the rafts. I have always rowed a fully loaded pig boat. I thought that would change when i bought my own and started doing more private trips. But it seems like i still have all the gear piled to the sky. The thing is I do a lot of 1 boat trips in my 16ft raft. I normally have the girlfriend or a buddy and i think i'm going light until i get to loading it all on and it's ridiculous! I suppose i could downsize from a paco to a backpacking pad and leave the chairs at home. The firepan always gets used but is heavy as shit and requires a 20mm ash/garbage can. Then there is the groover, i use a river bank, which for two people is way overkill and by the time I bring all the water jugs and all the beer i want there is barely enough room for a small kitchen box. Oh then there is propane and a stove and on and on..... The thing is I should know better i am really into ultralight backpacking and have my basepack down to 10lbs but just can't seem to translate some of those principles into rafting. Maybe someday i will learn :confused:
 

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My hubby and I once did a six day trip in AK on an Aire Wildcat. We had a York dry box, one drybag, and a pin/repair kit. The fact that there were no regs on human waste really helped us pull that trip off on a small boat. We dug holes for solid waste. The weather was bad with wind, rain, and snow, and there really wasn't much in the way of wood, so we never started a fire but there were no regs on that either. At night We just ate a backpacker meal, split a snickers, nipped the whiskey, and retired to the tent. It was our honeymoon.




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I once went so light I brought no chair. That sucked. When I got home I went and brought an aluminum camp chair. Ultrlightweight gets less and less appealing as I age. It is a fine balance between weight and comfort.

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As long as I can re flip my cat, I am light. Being light enough to re flip should make me light enough to make the move... I hope. I use this fire pan http://www.webstaurantstore.com/4-d...s-steel-steam-table-hotel-pan/922STP1004.html. The fire pan only lasts a 3-4 seasons, but it is cheap so no big deal. Sometimes I don't know if I can re flip until I am on the water, so it is a constant quest. I use way bags and a bucket for a light pooper. Yeah, I poop in a bucket, we pee in the stream...catchy tune. Oh yeah, eat steak on a light weight trip, you won't be sorry.


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I like ultra-light for a couple of reasons. Lighter keeps the performance up epically on a cat. Les gear the lower profile your rig will have when you flip + you can keep your tunnel wide open Take out: My local river the Tuolumne has a bitch of a take out, after that carry you wish you would have learned how to roll a kayak. I am a reformed commercial guide so I was use to taking A LOT of gear. Less is better you won’t lose so much. Think like a backpacker: Tarp instead of tent, water filter and small bottles, whiskey instead of beer. We use wag bags for waste. Lots of places to reduce the load.
I wish I would have gotten single chamber tubes on my cat. Could have shaved allot of weight off with that.
 

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Talk with some ultralight backpackers and pick their brains about how they pack, what they bring, etc. It certainly can be done. Many of them don't use tents. They use hammocks & tarps for sleep. They carry small stoves and minimal cook kits. They make their own freeze dried food, and they minimize on weight and size of gear wherever they can.

However, there will always be things that boaters have to bring, that backpackers don't.....more repair & safety stuff, groover, fire pan, ash can, shovel, etc. I still have my 10 foot Outcast mini-cat, and I've started kayak touring, so I've been switching my mindset to UL alternatives.
 

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Yeah, I've never found a direct link that carrying and dealing with more gear/crap equals a more enjoyable trip, as well.

bighorn, I think you get DQ'd for even having hand washing/ dish stations.;)

DQ me if you like, but clean hands for food handling, putting in contacts, clean and sanitized dishes all are easier to have for only an extra 5 #'s

My personal goal for a ultra light trip is to be self supporting (all required equipment) with 150 #'s of gear and food for a 5 day warm weather trip (boat and oars not included).

My 2010 GC trip I launched in my boat (no passengers) with 1600 pounds of group gear that no one else had room for:rolleyes: So 150 pounds to me is ultra light:-D
 

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Consider too putting the weight where you have to. For remote class 4/5 water I always carry a well stocked wrap kit, first aid, maps of the area w/access points, emergency lightweight food...For groups of 4 or more I do like to bring my 2 burner partner stove w/break-apart hinges and a small, light propane tank.

Aside from that, use a jetboil, a mega-mid/ultralight shelter, dehydrated food and substitute your beer for good quality whiskey. A lightweight crazy creek chair, ultralight insulated air mattress. I have an Engle 30qt drybox/cooler combo box I occasionally bring for any perishables.

Just like a backpack, all the grams add up. Get the best quality gear you can rely on and shave weight where you can. I'd be leery of using single chamber cat tubes, but some consider the weight savings worth the potential risk.
 

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Here's the chair I got for kayak touring. It's a Travelchair Joey. Similar to the Big Agnes Heliox, just a bit taller. Easy for me to get in & out of with a bum knee, comfy, and packs down super small.

+1 on the Partner two burner with take apart hinge. I love mine. Small, but you can separate the sides and still get a bigger pot on it.
 

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If I decided to get all light and minimal the kayakers in my group would see the weakness and just start piling on the dry bags and cases of beer! I try to look as big as possible, like a puffer fish, self defense ;)
 
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