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thoughts on driving with 66 lb outboard motor connected to a 15 ft raft mounted on a trailer...

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I was just wondering on anyone's thoughts out there if they have ever or what they think about leaving an outboard motor connected to their raft in transportation/driving mode. The outboard motor would still be mounted to the NRS u-shaped motor mount and tilted up (so bumps wouldn't knock a propeller off). A few additional details about our set up- the raft is up on the trailer and does slightly exceed the trailer's length by about 3 ft- already a bit of pressure on the lower portion of the tubes. So the motor would than add an additional 1 ft of "overhang". (I'm not worried about police pulling me over for exceeding the trailer length.) I'm worried about having too much weight on the back of the raft while in transport (bouncing around with potholes, corrugated roads) and potentially damaging the tubes.

We have a van full of humans and dogs, so our outboard motor is typically propped up on an angle inside our 15 ft raft towards the front of the trailer fully supported, which also balances out the trailer from sway. Crawling in and out of the raft while the raft is still mounted on the trailer (using a small ladder) and lifting 66 lbs over the side tube (about a 4-5 ft drop) is getting a little tiresome on the back. Even with the use of a ladder and two people helping, it still is a little hazardous and killjoy at times. (Side note- We've put the motor propped up in the van before, but the smell of gas is nauseating, and it hogs up a considerable amount of room.) We go out on a lakes a lot and need the motor. So leaving it at home isn't an option.

So my question- do you think I would damage my raft's tubes by leaving the 66 lb outboard motor attached while driving to our destinations? These destinations range from 1 hr to 8 hrs- mostly standard highways and the usual crappy, bumpy put in roads.

At one time, I was looking at buying a ladder to attach to the van's back doors and then attempting to suspend it from that, but I couldn't sell myself on that idea.

or.... does anyone else have any ideas?


Thank you for your thoughts and ideas!
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· westernCOboater
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I was just wondering on anyone's thoughts out there if they have ever or what they think about leaving an outboard motor connected to their raft in transportation/driving mode. The outboard motor would still be mounted to the NRS u-shaped motor mount and tilted up (so bumps wouldn't knock a propeller off). A few additional details about our set up- the raft is up on the trailer and does slightly exceed the trailer's length by about 3 ft- already a bit of pressure on the lower portion of the tubes. So the motor would than add an additional 1 ft of "overhang". (I'm not worried about police pulling me over for exceeding the trailer length.) I'm worried about having too much weight on the back of the raft while in transport (bouncing around with potholes, corrugated roads) and potentially damaging the tubes.

We have a van full of humans and dogs, so our outboard motor is typically propped up on an angle inside our 15 ft raft towards the front of the trailer fully supported, which also balances out the trailer from sway. Crawling in and out of the raft while the raft is still mounted on the trailer (using a small ladder) and lifting 66 lbs over the side tube (about a 4-5 ft drop) is getting a little tiresome on the back. Even with the use of a ladder and two people helping, it still is a little hazardous and killjoy at times. (Side note- We've put the motor propped up in the van before, but the smell of gas is nauseating, and it hogs up a considerable amount of room.) We go out on a lakes a lot and need the motor. So leaving it at home isn't an option.

So my question- do you think I would damage my raft's tubes by leaving the 66 lb outboard motor attached while driving to our destinations? These destinations range from 1 hr to 8 hrs- mostly standard highways and the usual crappy, bumpy put in roads.

At one time, I was looking at buying a ladder to attach to the van's back doors and then attempting to suspend it from that, but I couldn't sell myself on that idea.

or.... does anyone else have any ideas?


Thank you for your thoughts and ideas!
.
I was just wondering on anyone's thoughts out there if they have ever or what they think about leaving an outboard motor connected to their raft in transportation/driving mode. The outboard motor would still be mounted to the NRS u-shaped motor mount and tilted up (so bumps wouldn't knock a propeller off). A few additional details about our set up- the raft is up on the trailer and does slightly exceed the trailer's length by about 3 ft- already a bit of pressure on the lower portion of the tubes. So the motor would than add an additional 1 ft of "overhang". (I'm not worried about police pulling me over for exceeding the trailer length.) I'm worried about having too much weight on the back of the raft while in transport (bouncing around with potholes, corrugated roads) and potentially damaging the tubes.

We have a van full of humans and dogs, so our outboard motor is typically propped up on an angle inside our 15 ft raft towards the front of the trailer fully supported, which also balances out the trailer from sway. Crawling in and out of the raft while the raft is still mounted on the trailer (using a small ladder) and lifting 66 lbs over the side tube (about a 4-5 ft drop) is getting a little tiresome on the back. Even with the use of a ladder and two people helping, it still is a little hazardous and killjoy at times. (Side note- We've put the motor propped up in the van before, but the smell of gas is nauseating, and it hogs up a considerable amount of room.) We go out on a lakes a lot and need the motor. So leaving it at home isn't an option.

So my question- do you think I would damage my raft's tubes by leaving the 66 lb outboard motor attached while driving to our destinations? These destinations range from 1 hr to 8 hrs- mostly standard highways and the usual crappy, bumpy put in roads.

At one time, I was looking at buying a ladder to attach to the van's back doors and then attempting to suspend it from that, but I couldn't sell myself on that idea.

or.... does anyone else have any ideas?


Thank you for your thoughts and ideas!
It’s fine as long as its strapped down firmly to trailer so no bounce and as long as your wife isn’t following you in the other car. Short trips
 

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Maybe I'm doing it wrong but I almost always take the outboard off my little boats and canoes when I haul them in the truck or trailer. The exception may be the 1240 jon boat which is pretty stout with the 5 hp or smaller but always take the 9.9 hp off because it's over a 100 lbs.

The real question in my little mind is... what is the usual/max HP you folks run on a NSR Outlaw 130 using the NSR "U" shaped motor mount? I'm planning to use my 5 hp Tahatsu propane powered motor since there is no gasoline mess and it's pretty quiet. I just bought a Suzuki 2.3 hp and I'd like to try that as well. Anyone know where to get a propane conversion for that little thing??
 

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I think the NRS website recommends no more than a 9.9 on their transom. They make it sound like its more of an issue of the way the boat handles rather than the strength of the mount itself. For me, the biggest issue is the bailing holes and the displacement hull rather than a planing hull. Running a 20hp on my 16' boat, the back end gets buried and fills up with water. I don't think there would be any reason not to run your 5hp propane if you're ok with running the 2.3.
 

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Lowrider you’ll be fine seen several with 5 and 6. I’d have to look through my photos but I think I’ve seen some newer 10 hp Hondas on that transom and they are heavy.
Just put together the motor mount direct from NSR...ordered it Monday night and arrived today in a snow storm. I think I'm in full agreement...NSR can only be concerned about handling since that sucker is heavy enough to handle a 50 hp...very solid materials and construction!

BTW, we're up to 26" and rising...glad the heat is working in the cab on my tractor.
 

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IMHO...the whole damn thing is pretty burly. I looked at the mount the last time I was in the NRS store in Moscow and it was just laying there. When mine arrived yesterday I was pleasantly surprised. I usually put a piece of 0.100 6061 alum on both sides of the mounting location for the motor on the transom on my boats and will probably do the same on this mount BUT it's probably not necessary with little motors.

Still snowing lightly.
 

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Once you get the transom board where you need it I’d cut off the excess U bolt past the nuts. I gouged my arm on the little bastards putting the motor on while it was on the trailer.
IMHO...the whole damn thing is pretty burly. I looked at the mount the last time I was in the NRS store in Moscow and it was just laying there. When mine arrived yesterday I was pleasantly surprised. I usually put a piece of 0.100 6061 alum on both sides of the mounting location for the motor on the transom on my boats and will probably do the same on this mount BUT it's probably not necessary with little motors.

Still snowing lightly.
 

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You should do that with everything on your rig. Cut off/round off everything you can.
Great minds think alike. On my list of things to do it find an appropriate die to rethread those bolts after I grind them off. With the nyloc nuts you gotta be careful to not over heat and melt the nylon so I usually mark the bolt with a file then remove them and cut them AFTER threading a die onto the bolt. 5/16 is too heavy to easily cut with bolt cutters...at least for me. A lot of extra work but worth it.
NRS probably buys bulk bolts that fit in a variety of locations on their products. That length is hazardous for sure in that application. U bolts do allow fine tuning easily as necessary.

I have a son named "James Thomas" after his grandfathers...great name!!
Too late this go round. Cut them flush and ground them smooth no acorns going to sprout. Good idea.
Have you priced stainless acorns lately? I need 2 and went to the Homey place...1/2" were $4.50 EACH!!
Grind and buff with a Scotchbrite wheel and a squirt of locktite if the nylon melts.
 

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We have a van full of humans and dogs, so our outboard motor is typically propped up on an angle inside our 15 ft raft towards the front of the trailer fully supported, which also balances out the trailer from sway.
Several reasons above why its not a great idea to travel with it on there. Another is that weight bouncing 4' off the end of the trailer is going to cause negative tongue weight unless the bow of the raft is real loaded. Negative tongue weight bad.
I couldn't agree more with Zach. That was my first concern reading the original post.

I'd consider clamping/welding some type of "hitch" carrier/basket to the tongue of your trailer. It will help maintain trailer balance, yet keep the weight lower..both for travel and for you lifting it.
Rectangle Font Wood Parallel Auto part


You will need a trailer jack if you put that much weight on the tongue of the trailer, you won't likely be able to lift it by hand if you were before.
 

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Great minds think alike. On my list of things to do it find an appropriate die to rethread those bolts after I grind them off. With the nyloc nuts you gotta be careful to not over heat and melt the nylon so I usually mark the bolt with a file then remove them and cut them AFTER threading a die onto the bolt. 5/16 is too heavy to easily cut with bolt cutters...at least for me. A lot of extra work but worth it.
NRS probably buys bulk bolts that fit in a variety of locations on their products. That length is hazardous for sure in that application. U bolts do allow fine tuning easily as necessary.

Have you priced stainless acorns lately? I need 2 and went to the Homey place...1/2" were $4.50 EACH!!
Grind and buff with a Scotchbrite wheel and a squirt of locktite if the nylon melts.
I also mark (Sharpie) and cut with a cutoff wheel. I can usually hand-chamfer and then wire-wheel to an acceptable end.
I want to try one of these external debur/chamfer bits.

One can also thread on a non-locking nut, cut the threads slightly long, and when you unthread the nut, it will push the burr out of the threads...then file/grind/etc the chamfer. You can't really skip the chamfer and be able to thread a nut back on.

I get most of my hardware from Bolt Depot, McMaster, or Amazon
$12/10 on McMaster
$9/20 on Amazon
 

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Sort of a fun crazy thing to do. But given the way saltwater corrodes things, I don't hold out much hope for the future of that truck.

And of course the whole time I was watching it I wondered if the engine had been removed and the front compartment stuffed with blocks of Styrofoam to add to the flotation provided by their outrigger drums.
 
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