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A come-along?!
C'mon guys! I already bring too much shit! I do own a half dozen of those things, though...I guess one would fit in my rigging bag... 馃
Not a come along, a rope puller. Lay the rope in it and you have a come along that's as long as your rope. A Pulley doubles your power..
 

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A come-along?!
C'mon guys! I already bring too much shit! I do own a half dozen of those things, though...I guess one would fit in my rigging bag... 馃

Yes, it looks like a standard comealong, but isn't. That model is much heavier duty, and has the capability of hauling extended lengths of (static) rope through it without re-rigging for sequential pulls.

Rich
 

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Aaahhh!
And I had just told a buddy the other day: "I'm actually at a place in life where I don't really need any more camping\boating gear.
Thanks for the help! 馃ぃ馃槀
Ben, it's never enough. Just wait till you build that Dory.. Whole new set of dory specific gear..
 
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Oh, I know...
I think my next boat will be one of those 12'8" Sotar cats(not black!) For accessing the water I don't wanna take my barge on. And it'll be far easier to un-flip(keeping it on-topic! Although...my blue boat hasn't ever (yet) been upside down.... 馃槵) So I'll require a complete accoutrements of light weight equipment...
 

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A couple thoughts on this- first, if you are in big, deep water you will probably have waves/holes/seams handy to you- they were likely used to flip the boat wrong-side up in the first place, also can be used strategically to flip same boat back to right-side up. Obviously, with a fully rigged boat this isn鈥檛 ideal and will increase chances of adding to the gear yard sale along the riverbank.

Next, is a method my crew of 9 used on the GC a few years ago to right a fully loaded 18鈥檈r early in the trip- all it requires is a throw rope and flip line/webbing, and some shoreline for one team to stand on. Remove oars so you can either put them in sand to hold raft out in water or off to side if shore is rocky/steep and you aren鈥檛 concerned with the raft sliding up on the bank. Position raft parallel to shore. Feed throw rope UNDER flipped raft from center of far side, where it鈥檚 tied off to at least 2 frame/D-ring points (I tied to 3 equalized points to distribute forces), to team on shore. Team of 3-4 (or more) climb on flipped boat, tie flip line to D-rings on shore side, pulling toward center of river. Each team pulls in their respective direction.
 

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Looking for opinions on raft flip strategies. I'm thinking of an 18 footer oar rig in big deep water. Not a shallow water, or up against an obstruction scenario.
Your boat is going over.....do you try to stay with the boat or try to jump clear of it?
I was always thinking that if you try to jump clear you may put yourself in more harms way as a boat frame and oars potentially now have lots of momentum as they come down on top of you?
Versus if you were able ( maybe you can't ) to stay holding onto the boat, then you are flipping with and moving at the same speed as the frame and oars so maybe don't receive the same potential trauma?
I train all guides to stand up straight, lean back, and let them boat come over on top of them. Jumping away is just not a good strategy; that is a very advanced maneuver maybe with a 10' raft you could try something fancy but you really must get the raft upright the first try. The big danger, especially with a big raft like that, is a failure to recover... the real risk is in failing to right that raft and having to do it all over again. 18' rafts usually have 22" or bigger tubes.... you also hopefully have a flip line capable of having at least 2 people on it, like one that goes to the corner D rings and not just a 2 wrapper 6 footer that really won't get the job done on that boat.
 
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