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Any thoughts out there for storing water containers during the season?

I empty my water containers out and try to dry them out but there is always residual water left in them. Combine that with some nice warm temps in the garage and I'm sure there's some interesting growth.

I was thinking of doing a bleach wash before closing them up.

Oh, and the reason why I close it up is that with any residual water - it attract stuff that will put up residence in the container.
 

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I drain them, set them in the sun for a day or two, making sure there isn't any water left in it by periodically turning the jug over so any last drops get spread around the inside and evaporate. I always give the jug a good rinse before filling for a trip. If you only put clean water into the jug, & then dry it out after use, there shouldn't be any trouble. Dessication and backyard sitting-in-the-sun heat will do a pretty good job on any protozoa and bacteria hanging out in the jug.

Never had any problem, you may be overthinking this stuff or watching too many Lysol commercials. :) If you're really worried, give it a good bleach rinse before you use it. That's when you want it clean.
 

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I have mine emptied out, and in my shed. I leave them open for a few days, then close them up. I do a bleach rinse before each trip just to be sure.
 

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As suggested, rinse well after and before each use.

If you live in a humid climate, so humid you can't dry them out in a couple days upside down.
Move.

Feel free to consult with a Boise vs Bend thread here.

=========

From the Chlorine Disinfection Timetable

CDC - Chlorine Disinfection Timetable - Pools & Hot Tubs - Healthy Swimming & Recreational Water - Healthy Water

Cryptosporidium (Parasite) approximately 10.6 days to kill.
Don't be blindly confident in chlorine.
Be clean.
If you're water container is suspect do a long term chlorine soak.

Or a Craigslist curb alert.
 

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I use my containers as dirties at resupply as we use a gravity filter in camp (save 1-2 for clean only).

At home I dose the containers with Aqua Mira and let is it sit for several days. Someone got giardia on one of our river trips so we are extra cautious now. I am guessing it was from dragging his bottle in the river as we always treated containers with bleach in the past. That said, we started spending the $12 a season to kill all of the potential bugs, as bleach does not kill crypto.

If you are concerned about micros then make sure to rotate the jug with bleach in it and clean the lids and spouts thoroughly. Also make sure your bleach is fresh, as it only lasts a few months. If really worried then go with Aqua Mira....it kills everything to be worried about, has no taste and no negative effect on people (bleach is tolerable in low doses but still toxic for consumption).

Phillip
 

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Using your link and going to:
http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/pdf/drinking/Backcountry_Water_Treatment.pdf

It shows Chlorine as a - for treatment of Cryptosporidium.
Does give a positive to Chlorine Dioxide for Crypto.

Aquamira and other products........
 

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Using your link and going to:
http://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/pdf/drinking/Backcountry_Water_Treatment.pdf

It shows Chlorine as a - for treatment of Cryptosporidium.
Does give a positive to Chlorine Dioxide for Crypto.

Aquamira and other products........
Just to clarify, in case of confusion.....Aqua Mira = Chlorine Dioxide

And in general chlorine is rather ineffective at killing the cysts of protozoa, hence the occasional outbreaks in swimming pools (the perils of baby poop).

In reality, if your jugs are completely dry and not used for a couple weeks than there should little to no chance of protozoan cyst survival. Add that to the fact there is little evidence that infections are coming from backcountry water itself (many systematic reviews hint at user-to-user transmission from a previously infected individual) and a little caution likely is all that is needed. I am knowingly extra cautious having had giardia 15 years ago, having a friend that got it during a visit it Utah that included a river trip, and knowing cows infest most of the rivers I raft. Would likely be less concerned with some of the side drainages in ID but I have no doubt that there is some level of biological pollution in Deso's side streams. $12 a year for some peace of mind is a cheap, though possibly unnecessary, investment for me now. It only takes getting giardiasis once to not want that experience again or to force others to deal with those horrendous sulfur farts. Nasty. Not to mention losing 25-35 pounds isn't as pleasant as it sounds.
:p

Phillip
 

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If moisture is something you simply cannot get rid of, you can also use Hydrogen Peroxide. It's a much "nicer" chemical in that one rinse gets rid of it and it decomposes in the waste stream rapidly and with near zero impact. You can get high test peroxide from places that sell environmentally friendly cleaners (upwards of 30%). Pour a cup in a container, seal and swish, and it'll stay clean for months even when damp provided you keep it sealed.
 
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