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In my opinion, both from an engineering and a boating standpoint the NRS low pro fitting is Superior in every way except one to the cast fittings in the end of a piece of pipe. The bonus to having the latter is that you can adjust the height with a hacksaw, the NRS fittings, you deal with the height you bought.. not that big of a deal at the end of the day, but it's about the only bonus that I can see.

The NRS fittings will not cave in your pipe, they don't chew it up, they are infinitely adjustable and you can take them off without disassembling the entire frame, I have seen one bent once, but never seen the casting broken, and I have seen a couple of the castings such as DRE uses break in a flip, I'm sure it encountered a rock, but nonetheless.
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With NRS can't you effectively shorten the tower by angling it out more? I would think the only reason to go DRE is they offer a 12" max height over 10" from NRS.
 

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With NRS can't you effectively shorten the tower by angling it out more? I would think the only reason to go DRE is they offer a 12" max height over 10" from NRS.
Yeah, I can't imagine anybody actually ever needing a 10-in high or lock stand, the amount of leverage that puts in the attachment point is incredible. If you're sitting that high up in the air that you need an oar stand that high, you might want to rethink why you're sitting that high up in the air. I've never seen an actual genuine justifiable reason for it, past buying one of those Dre chairs that sits you a foot and a half up in the air higher than you need to be. People don't realize that you can cut those things down. But that's a different topic for a different thread
 

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Anti-seize and thread locker are two different compounds. I don't use thread locker on my set screws but do use anti seize as you are working with a galvanized set screw and an aluminum fitting + water. I figure it can't hurt other than being a little messy to work with. I use the silver Permatex brand. I also drill my oar stands and fittings for a clinch pin so if the set screws do loosen it won't pop out of the frame fitting. I have never had a problem with cracking although others may feel differentially. I do this on all my frame fittings and think it is especially important on the frame ends as the set screws do loosen over time due to the aluminum extruding from the pressure of the set screws. Just the nature of aluminum, being soft it never stops extruding.
You may not lose them, but when they loosen up and your oar tower folds flat against the side of the raft, while you're still on the water, chances are you're not going to have time to break out the propane torch next to the rubber raft to heat them up to loosen the set screw to retighten it again.. loctite, especially red loctite, is a patently bad idea in my opinion...

I'm not sure what you mean by aluminum doesn't stop extruding? To extrude is the process of forcing metal or other material through a die. Once it has been formed, that's it, it's in it's end state
Good point about the oar towers, I guess some folks do keep an allen wrench in their vest... I bought a used speedrail frame once that had braced AAA oar towers, I guess the guy was sick of them rotating at inopportune times, that was an interesting frame for sure, heavy too. I have used blue loctite on some tee set screws, I thought they were loosening over time/washboard roads but perhaps they are loose because the softer aluminum deforms under the set screw pressure? Dunno, I can overcome blue loctite with muscle...

Bicycle part Auto part Rim Wood Metal
 

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If you can't overcome blue loctite with a 2" allen key you shouldn't be on the sticks. But buy the NRS towers, MNichols is correct about their superior design.
 

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Good point about the oar towers, I guess some folks do keep an allen wrench in their vest... I bought a used speedrail frame once that had braced AAA oar towers, I guess the guy was sick of them rotating at inopportune times, that was an interesting frame for sure, heavy too. I have used blue loctite on some tee set screws, I thought they were loosening over time/washboard roads but perhaps they are loose because the softer aluminum deforms under the set screw pressure? Dunno, I can overcome blue loctite with muscle...

View attachment 78616
Well, that sure one way to stiffen them up LOL..

River rat Ray of tuff River stuff had me do that to his oar towers, he's a really tall guy, and ran a 168 quart cooler in his boat this set him up in the air...

But generally, you really don't need oar towers that tall if you're rowing system is set up properly for good body mechanics..
 

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Pops somewhere on the Colorado in the 70's:
View attachment 78617

Check out the wood frame and the oar "clamps"
Those are called drop pin oar stands, Dee Holiday of Holiday tours may he rest in peace, his company still uses them commercially to this day.

I've never rowed them myself, but his boatman don't seem to have any trouble with them. But then again Holiday tour still runs wooden frames..
 

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Speaking of Holiday I hear they lash boats together and run the big stuff sideway (like a sweep boat) or something like that? Impressive trust in your fellow boatman to do what is needed.

Just doing my part to fully derail this thread.
 

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Speaking of Holiday I hear they lash boats together and run the big stuff sideway (like a sweep boat) or something like that? Impressive trust in your fellow boatman to do what is needed.

Just doing my part to fully derail this thread.
To this day, they still teach their rookie boatman how to do a triple rig, they tie three boats together, side by side and enter the rapid sideways, one downstream oarsman, one upstream oarsman..

It works, back in the day when he was still alive, I watched Dee admonishing his guides to make sure that they wet the straps they were tying the boats together with, in case they stretched. I took him aside and told him that today's modern straps don't stretch like the old Cotton ones, to which he replied, we probably still have some old Cotton ones laying around, and it's not hurting anything to wet the polypro or nylon ones, and if they should find an old Cotton one, then they're safe anyway..

He was a hell of a boatman. And legendary for doing the first descent of warm springs rapid on the yampa..
 

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Thread derailment in full effect!

I have a AAA seat and actually really like it, the legs are cut down and the mesh is suspended probably 2-3" (yes, inches) above the dry box and I pretty much sit the same height if I run without a chair and sit on a paco. The mesh is cooler, you don't sit in a paco puddle all day and it locks you in side to side. I tried the 8" NRS towers and they felt too short, switched them out for 10" and they felt much better. Low water MFS trip last summer I rowed from the dry box and they didn't feel high at all.

Marshall, I know, I know, a chair and 10" oar towers - two strikes right there!
 

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Yeah, but your friends with TNT, I got to cut you a lot of slack right there! Not to mention we had a lot of fun a couple of years ago 😉🥰
 
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