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Discussion Starter #1
So Im buying my wife an Ik to get her on the water. I was just wondering what you guys and gals would recommend as far as going with a solo or tandem. thank you for your time.
 

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Solo is my opinion. Easier to control and less likely to wrap. Unless you plan to run multi days, then the Extra room comes in handy.


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Paddling in to the Future
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I agree with InflatableSteve on this one. - I personally prefer solo, but I also own one tandem just for multi day trips, where I carry my own gear.
 

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Seconding what I Steve said. The tandem has a greater chance of wrapping, especially on smaller rocky rivers. Also harder to get out of a wrap than a solo. Its one advantage would be on big high volume water for punching through holes and stuff. So basically You should take into consideration what type of water you will be paddling predominantly and choose accordingly.
 

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Solo. We have had both and are switching to just singles. They are better for just about everything. Will you be in a hardshell? and what kind of trips will you be using it on, day trips or overnights?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Solo. We have had both and are switching to just singles. They are better for just about everything. Will you be in a hardshell? and what kind of trips will you be using it on, day trips or overnights?
Or local run only has one class IV "North Umpqua" and in my opinion the class IV is really tame. She will be in the Ik by herself with me in my hard shell. My experience starts and ends with the sevylor tahiti. Me and her went out on one of those shitty boats this summer. After that I understand the divorce maker name haha. But to my surprise even after 3 hr of me telling her that shes doing everything wrong she still wants a boat."of her own hahaha" I just wasn't sure if she would be more comfortable in a solo or tandem. After all the awesome replies we will be going solo.
 

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Jared
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I'd get a single. Aire Lynx, Tomcat, or Sotar if you really want the best boat. I've paddled all of them, for me the Lynx does 95% of what I want it to well, the Tomcat is a good value, but the Sotar SL's are the best. I could get a custom Sotar SL and never want for another IK again. Saying that, if it is her first boat, the Tomcat is plenty. The North Umpqua is great, I took a new to me Lynx down it last spring from Boulder to Gravel bin, it was great.
 

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" But to my surprise even after 3 hr of me telling her that shes doing everything wrong she still wants a boat."of her own hahaha" I just wasn't sure if she would be more comfortable in a solo or tandem. After all the awesome replies we will be going solo."

As a ACA WW kayak instructor since 1991, my advice to husbands training their wives on how to paddle is, be real careful with comments and how you say it. Offering more support than critical comments is key. I saw the ha ha in the post, but most wives I have taught take hubby's every comment as serious.

Might be a good thing if you get her in a good intro to paddling multi day clinic, ideally one with girl instructors.

I totally agree with the going with a solo IK.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
"

As a ACA WW kayak instructor since 1991, my advice to husbands training their wives on how to paddle is, be real careful with comments and how you say it. Offering more support than critical comments is key. I saw the ha ha in the post, but most wives I have taught take hubby's every comment as serious.

Might be a good thing if you get her in a good intro to paddling multi day clinic, ideally one with girl instructors.

I totally agree with the going with a solo IK.
I agree with you after the trip I felt bad, I could have had more patients and I defiantly learned keeping a positive attitude is key. I would get her into some classes but we live in a smaller town with little to no organized boating groups or businesses. So that would be hard for us and would have to travel to do classes.
 

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I'd recommend getting her in a class, even it if takes a trip to get to one. Getting in a 2-5 day trip would be optimal. Get her a foundation, and let her find out what she needs to learn by someone else who she trusts, would be ideal. Then when you go out and paddle together, you do not need to tell her much of anything, other than describing the lines you are going to take down a rapid, and what to look out for. This should make the education come in a way she doesn't feel negative about. Try to avoid tell her what she did wrong unless she asks or if she's doing something dangerous. Instead, give beta and show her how it is done so she can pick up on what you do right. She should start to figure things out that way without it feeling like you are putting her down.

I've never taught a significant other, but no one likes to be corrected from what I've seen, but most people listen to instructions on how to run a rapid which can include some basic paddling instruction.
 

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I would think twice about buying an IK. Could you borrow or rent one? The same thing happened to hubby and myself. I was shuttle bunny for years then decided on an IK so I could join in the fun. Once I sat in the eddy while everyone surfed, I quickly tired of the IK and went to a hard shell. I have been kayaking ever since. And oh ya...get someone else to teach her. Us women don't listen to our hubby's very well Ha Ha. He sent me on an all girls trip and when I got back he couldn't believe the things I had learned. He said "If I told you to run that you never would."
 

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The issue with a hardshell is if she struggles to learn to roll, she's not going to have fun. I've seen some people learn to roll fast, and others take years to learn. Most quit over it.
 

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Jared
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I am too damn fat to be in a hardshell. I've always inflatable kayaked. I kept a few extras around for a long time that I loaned out. I think you can't go wrong getting an IK, and keeping it even if she doesn't. One of my loaner IK's came from my cousin. I introduced him to kayaking and he quickly progressed to a hardshell, and still kayaks 15 years later. We keep that IK he started in to take new people and novices down stuff. One of the other boats was my wifes old IK before I got her a Sotar SL.
Also Poedunk, the NWRA (Northwest rafters association) is alive and well in Roseburg. The Umpqua trip I did was a club trip that they hosted. I know you are a kayaker, but I think you would find them to be a great resource for a beginner boater. I'm sure there has to be some hard boaters in the club as well. The trip we did had several IK boaters and 4 or 5 hard boaters amongst a sea of rafts, catarafts, and even two SUP boarders that did all 15 miles with us. Many people I met for the first time on that trip, and I'd gladly do a 5 day trip with them anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I would think twice about buying an IK. Could you borrow or rent one? The same thing happened to hubby and myself. I was shuttle bunny for years then decided on an IK so I could join in the fun. Once I sat in the eddy while everyone surfed, I quickly tired of the IK and went to a hard shell. I have been kayaking ever since. And oh ya...get someone else to teach her. Us women don't listen to our hubby's very well Ha Ha. He sent me on an all girls trip and when I got back he couldn't believe the things I had learned. He said "If I told you to run that you never would."
I would rather go the hard shell route but as bystander said Im worried hardshell will scare her out of it. She is super fresh to the water and still doesn't fully grasp basic paddle skills i.e turning/holding a straight line. After everyones input we are going to find a class.
 

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Get the biggest one you can. It is safer, and more stable for your cooler, kitchen, your gear, your other cooler, your friend's gear, the dog, and a firepan, and all that stuff. Make her C1 it too.
 
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