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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have established myself as a foodie and others have done the same so I am wondering if anybody has some recipes for smoking foods? We inherited an average bullet style propane and/or charcoal smoker and I am excited to start playing around with the new tool. Anybody have secrets or lessons learned that can help me skip too many painful experiences (worse when you spend 8-12 hours waiting for the food to cook)? Recipes?

Smoking for the first time today and learned quickly the importance of wood chunks versus chips. Its looking the pork butt is still cooking nicely and getting a good bark but takes a lot more work.

Excited to make some homemade sausage, especially andouille, and smoke them. Gonna wait on fish until I get a hang on friendlier, fattier cuts of meat.

Thanks for any input to help me use the tool more effectively.

Phillip
 

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Used to be a pit boss, charcoal and hickory only. 250-275 is ideal. A good rub. Wood for first 1-3 hrs on brisket and shoulders. 1hr for ribs. 10-12 hrs at 250 for brisket/pork. 4-8hrs on ribs. really depends on if you keeping temp at a constant 250 or not. Low and slow. Timing all depends on temps and your smoker. Highly recommend taking notes, easier to hone in your smoker/skills. Also outside temps can have a huge effect on your temps and cooking time. If you do brisket I highly recommend getting the whole thing, fat cap in tact. Also when doing pork butts/shoulder, good tell that the meat is ready is when the bone pops 1/2" out. Mmmmmm
"Trucker Sando"
Pulled pork or brisket
Bun-fries-sauce-meat-sauce-melted jalapeño cream cheese-slaw-bun


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I have a different take on it than Jimr, but if you get good results that's all that matters. I prefer a temp around 175°, once the meat is cooked it stops taking smoke flavor. Light smoke is where it's at, heavy billowing smoke will get you creasote and inedible meat. When I switched to an electric smoker I learned I couldn't get a decehnt bark, was always to moist. Went back to charcoal for the heat and an amazin pellet fed smoke generator. If you like the results than your doing it right. Oh yeah the eclectic smoker is great for cheese and veggies.
 

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That's why I love BBQ everyone can crush with different styles, and it is still sooo good. Most my time was in a large North Carolina brick pit. Like you said above type of smoker can have different effects for sure! Shit u can smoke some amazing ribs off an ol classic webber.


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Here are some of my favorites

Canadian Bacon....
Dizzy Pig Cow Lick Canadian Bacon | Dizzy Pig BBQ

Salmon Candy....
Salmon Candy - BarbecueBible.com

One tip a friend of mine uses, keep a bag of yellow onions on hand and every time you fire up the smoker fill the left over space with onions. The resulting slow cooked onions are fantastic. Freeze the leftovers to add to stews, soups and sauces later on.

turkey pastrami, makes great sandwiches..
http://www.primalgrill.org/recipe_details.asp?RecipeID=3&EpisodeID=1
 

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See what works for you and learn how to operate your smoker. Trial and error. You will mess some stuff up! Check your smoking items often (but not too often) when you are still learning a recipe...


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Fancy stuff on this thread. Our smoker is a tin shed build about 60 years ago.

Put polish or fish in smoker.

Build a fire on the pan with Popple (oh wait, um, I mean Aspen. Aspen is what you call it when you're doing trim work..or smoking)

Put fire in the shed.

Have a beer.

Check heat by putting your hand on the shed.

Fire isn't quite hot enough...take shovel (the one that's propped up against the door holding it closed) and re-position for more air flow.

Beer.

Put hand on shed for 2 seconds too long..it's hot enough now.

Polish start dripping fat..they're done.

Yeah, we're not very sophisticated but it works for us. Someday if I ever smoke something besides whitefish or polish I'll have to take it a little more seriously.
 

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Seriously though, fish are really easy to smoke and not really expensive if you screw up.

If you have access to whitefish or anything similar it should be pretty cheap.

Saltwater brine and smoke..that's it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Seriously though, fish are really easy to smoke and not really expensive if you screw up.

If you have access to whitefish or anything similar it should be pretty cheap.

Saltwater brine and smoke..that's it.
Looking forward to smoking the trout I start catching this year. Beyond being tasty I think it could make great lunches or appetizers for the river.

Phillip
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
See what works for you and learn how to operate your smoker. Trial and error. You will mess some stuff up! Check your smoking items often (but not too often) when you are still learning a recipe...


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Yeah, the first attempt taught me the reality of it being trial and error. Not too band for first attempt and made some great eastern north carolina pulled pork sandwiches and hush puppies. Family would have disowned me if I didn't go that way the first time.

The "bark" was amazing, which I wasn't expecting for a first attempt.

We make our own sausage so I think that will be the place we explore the most. Its nearly impossible to find proper andouille within a couple hours of us so I can playing with that to dial in my technique.

Phillip
 

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Yes I too enjoy smoking some type of leafy vegetable I just can't remember what its called though?

Nonsense, I have not yet begun to defile myself
 

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Long time smoked meat cooker with the bullet type AKA Cajun Microwave smoker. Also have charcoal, propane and just got a electric smoker last Christmas. It is not just meat in your smoker. Cheese works but takes attention to keep temp right. I often toss in potatoes or onions and both smoke well. I am a big fan of smoked brats, bologna, chicken and often toss them in the smoker along with the ribs which are a favorite. Just watch internal temps as different products take different smoke times.

All the devices mentioned, are great cooking tools, depends on the situation or just work with the design you have. I have never smoked meat on the Weber style charcoal grill but see it done a lot on TV especially BBQ University on Public TV. This style grill should travel reasonably well and it does smoking and grilling.

I never smoked meat on a river trip, but on a layover day that bullet smoker or a Weber would make for some good eating for sure. Back in the times we spent many week end days at local lakes, I used my Cajun Microwave to smoke a turkey. Crank up the smoke on arrival and have cheap but tasty sandwiches later in the day. I would slice the turkey breast, shred the rest. Bring a supply of good BBQ sauce from home or a local BBQ joint and you have a great lake side treat.

The only cooking tip I have is low and slow and watch the temp. One thing I like about my Camp Chef propane smoker is the fact it is pretty easy to keep the temps constant (altho it does need checking / adjustments every so often). Smoking meat does take time so plan for it. For proper cooking, I use a meat thermometer as a check plus the tried and true other ways you learn over time.

One of my favorite river meals is pulled pork sandwiches or other smoked meat. Pulled pork travels well in a cooler and works on standard bread or Tortillas. Same for ribs, just toss on the grill to heat em up.
 

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Forgot this one.

During winter time here in the Oklahoma flatlands, when the wind comes from the north outside smoking is not one of my fun things to do. My need for pulled pork is still there.

My son in law got me started cooking pork butts as described below. Do interweb search for maybe other methods. I believe this style comes from the TexMex cooker community.

Get a smaller sized piece of pork butt. I go ahead and do one of my favorite rubs on the meat as per usual smoking procedures plus I add in a general rub of brown sugar.. In the bottom of a pot, put a layer of thick onion slices. Insert the meat. Open a can of chipole chilis and sauce on top of the meat (adjust amount to taste). Pour in a can of regular (NO diet stuff here) Dr Pepper soft drink almost to the top of the meat. Put in a medium oven and cook till the meat is done. I will sometimes add more Dr. Pepper if it cooks down a lot. When the meat starts falling apart, take it out and shred. Stir in what ever amount of the strained cooking sauce to your taste. Store finished meat in the fridge if any left. My favorite way to serve this is on either corn or flour Torts along with sour cream and shredded cheese to taste. Maybe a little of your favorite Salsa on top is a good thing. Altho I grew up in North GA with outside sliced pork shoulder on burger buns as one of my favorite foods, this South of the Border serving style is awful tasty.

I ask forgiveness from the smoke meat community, this is not your classic pull pork cooking method, but it sure works good during the winter!!!
 

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okieboater,


you forgot the coleslaw for the pulled pork sandwiches ;-)
 

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Memory is not my strong suite these days.

Cole slaw is indeed the ideal topping for any style pull pork sandwich!!!!

You Sir, have pull pork river sandwiches figured out for sure.
 

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Memory is not my strong suite these days.

Cole slaw is indeed the ideal topping for any style pull pork sandwich!!!!

You Sir, have pull pork river sandwiches figured out for sure.
That is one of the meals I am bringing for the smith this year unless you want to volunteer:D
 
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