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Discussion Starter #1
Let me start off by saying I am a fisherman, mainly a fly fisherman, who enjoys drifting rivers. I bought a Pontoon boat (terminology used by fisherman to describe what you would know as a small cataraft). I have an Outcast PAC 1100 FS. Outcast is owned by AIRE as many of you already know, and shares some of the AIRE heritage as far as build quality, etc. Perhaps just a stripped down boat in some ways more geared towards portability, angler friendly features, etc, but with no loss in quality or attention to detail for the most part. Where AIRE Catarafts are 12-18 feet, Outcast Pontoon boats (Mini-Catarafts) are 8-11 feet. My Outcast PAC 1100 has 11 foot pontoons, single Urethane AIREcell with PVC Covers for each pontoon. It's got a simple 4 piece frame, nothing too exciting.

Anyways, I am coming on this forum because I want to deepen my knowledge and respect for the river drifting side of things. I don't anticipate running much past Class 3 white water based on descriptions and what I have seen and what I know the limits of my boats abilites are. It's not that I anticipate getting cawky and trying to run crazy white water, I more would just like to be prepared should something happen while out drifting rivers and fishing. And after reading this forum a few times I've come to respect the experience many of you offer.

I have slowly started acquiring various back up parts should something happen.
Spare Oar with spare oar tether, spare cam straps, Spare oar locks, Spare Oar Lock Bushings, Back up Leafield adapter for inflation, things along those lines. And now I'm looking at the toons themselves as far as potentially needing to do on river repairs or replacements. I recently bought a spare PAC 1100 Urethane AIREcell that I will take along with me so I should be covered if something happens to one of my AIREcell's while out drifting I can replace it which will save time over repairing it. But where I am looking for assistance is should a tear happen to one of my PVC covers. I know they're pretty heavy duty and problems are rare that way. But I want to be prepared. So here is what I am thinking and I'd appreciate your opinion.

I just bought a roll of Type B Tear-aid (3" x 5' long). If something happens while out on the water I should be able to use this to temporarily patch the PVC to protect the AIREcell (assuming nothing happened to the AIREcell too). I will then buy an Outcast repair kit found at this link: Fishing pontoon boat and float tube gear and accessories | Outcast

Where I can then use this kit at the end of the fishing day to do a more permanent repair by using the Clifton adhesive. Now I watched some of the repair videos on the NRS website and it looks pretty straight forward. I've been told that the Stabond glue is better at more quickly setting up than Clifton.

So what I'm wondering is a few things

1) Is my methodology sound - are tear-aid patches a good get you through the rest of the day option until you can more permanently patch the PVC covers or should I do something more permanent right away on the river banks as far as field repairs?

2) Can you remove Tear-aid patches later on to do a more permanent repair or is it not that easy?

3) Is there anything else you see that I should add to a pontoon repair kit for field repairs? I don't want to go crazy, I just want to be proactive not reactive. I don't want to be stuck on the river banks up sh*t creek if it's fair to say. The funny thing is I KNOW A LOT of guys who have little to no fall back plan this way. They just depend on their toons being durable, which they are for the most part, and if something were to happen I guess they'd whip out the old roll of duct tape, or, call a buddy, or?

Thanks for your time,

Scott
 

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Overkill. Don't worry about your outer PVC covers. You just won't tear them. Oh sure, it's possible theoretically, but you won't tear them. Get a kit with urethane glue and tape for the bladders, a spare valve and the appropriate tools, INSTRUCTIONS for both and you're good to go. The spare AireCell is commendable, but overkill as well. Get rid of the excess, free up more room for beer and ice, or that good cider you have up there. Learn how to drive that rig. Get out there, Enjoy! I picked up a Water Skeeter a while back and added to my fleet of rafts, it makes Class II a whole new adventure, kind of like riding a cork. I'll use it in a few weeks on the Upper C, can't wait.
Peace-
The Capt.
 

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I have the same boat except its the hd not fs, so thicker pvc and dual air chambers. Back when I lived in Maryland, I ran hard class 3 and easy (ish) 4 runs, the little boat kills technical rivers...untill you find a big hole. The little guy surfs and filps really fast. While its not the best boat for whitewater (mostly because its all rocker and very little flat profile on the tubes, meaning it get turned easily, like when punching holes) its a blast, very stout, and extremely easy to self rescue and right alone.

It'll do great on those shallow little rivers in BC.
 

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Sounds like you have it covered. Some Tear-Aid for on the river quick repairs, and more comprehensive repair materials for afterwards. if you are just doing day trips that should be fine. For overnighters I'd bring a full repair kit along.

I started out with an Outcast 1000. Great boat, still have it. I learned to run class III in that little boat, and got hooked on whitewater about 16 years ago. I've had four catarafts & rafts since then, but still love that little mini-cat. Have fun.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone for your responses. Cataraft girl how does your full repair kit differ than what I intend to carry? Thanks again!
 

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The outcast kit you referenced is really just a slimmed down verision of the larger AIRE raft repair kit with the same materials and supplies for both PVC and bladder repairs -it should have you covered, especially since you've got a spare bladder along already. There are fairly specific steps to follow when preparing for PVC patches but its not rocket surgery, and the glues included in the kits should really be replaced annually.
 

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I agree about the overkill, I wouldn’t carry most of that stuff unless maybe it was a super remote extended trip.*** Oarlock and some glue and patch should do it.

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One thing I don’t leave home without is some Loon UV boat repair.*** *It’s essentially like the wader repair or Knot Sense, UV activated glue similar to Aquaseal but doesn’t take hours.** I’ve repaired pontoons, bladders, valves, awnings, with this stuff and it lasts.** It will take care of any pinhole or small tear issues quickly.

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It wasn’t mentioned but I don’t know why you would ever be doing major or permanent repairs on that boat.** Aire’s warranty is excellent, any issues you end up having I would send it back to them to fix.** Even if you caused it they’ll probably repair it.

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Thanks everyone for your responses. Cataraft girl how does your full repair kit differ than what I intend to carry? Thanks again!
Tear-Aid for day trips. Patch material & glue for overnights or weekends, just in case you get damage in an area that's hard to fix with just Tear-Aid alone. Otherwise it sounds like you already have a nice, full repair kit planned. I never carried a spare oarlock until I saw a commercial guide in training bend the crap out of one in the first rapid out of Boundary Creek on the Middle Fork. I've carried one ever since. You can usually rig something up to get you through a day trip, but multi-day trips require more thought. When I was first starting out, I did several weekend trips with my little Outcast PAC 1000. The back deck can carry enough gear for a weekend trip. Then I got cocky, and ran a high water Split Mountain trip. We didn't scout Moonshine, and I got my ass handed to me. That's when I started down the whitewater cataraft road, and I've never looked back. I still have the Outcast. Can't bear to part with it, and it's such a great fishing rig.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you everyone for your time!
 

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One thing you might consider adding to the TearAid kit (which I think is all you need for day trips), is a heavy duty awl with rugged thread. If you get a large gash you can bring the ends close together and get a bit of "structural" support from the awl/thread, then put the TearAid over top of that for waterproofness.
 
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