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So you want to make your own dropbag huh? Here is how I made mine.

snip
Awesome post, I really liked how you talked about some of the pitfalls like sewing the loose strap end to your piece and the seam/hem description was perfect.

I personally hate using pins and for the drop bags I have made, I draw a line with a long metal ruler on the mesh (and x's where the webbing should go so you don't get confused about which side of the line) and square up the webbing with the line as I sew it on, ditto for the top webbing, I throw a couple of clips on the edges/ends just to set my length.

Best clips I have found are Clover brand, cheaper ones just don't have the bite:

You'll notice three things if you look close. First I pined the strap tails so I wouldn't inadvertently sew them to something, second the corner has one side taller than the other. This is because we haven't hemmed it yet. Lastly, the bag is inside-out.

Next hem the un-hemmed edges so that they are the same height as the other piece. Be sure and fold the fabric the right way.
I find it easier to sew the edge hems before sewing the corners, it does take some thought about which way the hems will end up.
 

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Also have an 8x8 pyramid for my dory:


I really need to build a dish drop bag.
EDIT: Forgot to say those tents are awesome, reinforced corners and a lot of measuring/sewing!

Like a dish drying sling? It's not too bad, just one big piece of material, then sew on some pockets and make the edges look nice. I like using metal d-rings for the attachment points if something is being strapped to a table, between knives and heat it is nice if you can grab a cam strap to repair... I always use black mesh for silverware/dish drying slings now, easier to see in the pockets that way.

Automotive tire Hood Grille Automotive lighting Road surface

Sleeve Grey Denim Sportswear Automotive exterior

Automotive tire Hood Bumper Automotive exterior Wood
 

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Looking to go big with a couple drop bag projects, but not sure if I should go with a commercial fabric ($$) or use what I have on hand. Don't want to waste a half-day or more sewing and ripping and sewing again (thanks for the design and tutorial gwhayduke) only to end up with something that is marginally useful because I saved a few bucks on fabric.

Tricks or Tips?
I made a drop bag for a 150 qt Rubbermaid cooler and used Phifertex Plus ordered from Seattle Fabrics. Probably overkill. Contents of a drop bag are hanging from the frame on the webbing that spans the width of the bag. This means the weakest link is the stitching for the cam buckle or the webbing that goes through the buckle, or the buckle itself. Polyester webbing and quality cam buckles are a good idea or if the drop bag lives on the frame just omit the cam buckles and use stainless sliders.

I'm glad I used cam buckles so I could raise my cooler easily for two low water trips last year.

My opinion, which could be totally wrong, is that trampoline material will be fine, avoid sharp edges when loading like any drop bag.
 

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This mesh is my secret weapon,
But at $40/yard, I have to use it sparingly.
I want some of that, Seattle fabrics charges $32/yard for Phifer Plus, that includes shipping and assuming you ordered 6 yards - although if it's $40 before shipping, hmmm.

I got some mesh with a pair of Black Diamond skins (they call them skin savers) that I bought last year, after multiple emails nobody could give me a source, one person mentioned the mesh was probably sourced "overseas". Looks similar but yours looks like bigger squares and thicker coating.


Calipers Font Line Measuring instrument Mesh
 

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The local classifieds has the ability to send you an email based on keywords, got a hit on Consew yesterday and picked up this new looking 206RB-2 made by Seiko in the 90's. Manual oiling but that's preferred as I will go for a while between projects. I can mostly control it via the clutch motor but I don't need or want that speed.

Planning on asking my local shop (Daines in SLC) for a recommendation on servo motors tomorrow, does anybody here have a favorite?

Sewing machine feet Sewing machine Sewing machine needle Sewing Household appliance accessory



Didn't even break a sweat with 5 layers of polypro as expected, I think if you can fit it under the foot it will sew...
Tire Wood Automotive tire Tool Floor
 

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using a binding guide and why you need one. If you have every tried this by hand it obvious why this accessory is essential.

Binding Guide for industrial sewing machine.
I'll be picking up a 1" binding guide at some point, how do you manage the webbing spool? After watching the video a couple of times I finally figured out that you were using the metal tool to hold the cut end of the webbing down...

I've done it by hand, it sucks. I used light duty polypro and pre-folded the webbing, no pinning but I have used clips.
 

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I'm working on a gear net that I'm making out of Textilene woven mesh and polypropylene webbing. I just learned about different needle styles and am wondering if I am fine using a universal needle or should I be using a ball point needle?
I have never tried a ball point, I would just use a regular or sharp needle. If your machine balks at the thickness of the material using a universal, you don't have enough machine for what you are doing but might be able to get away with it using a sharp needle.
 

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I would obviously go all the way across, it's a PITA rolling up the big ol' piece of material so you can feed it through the machine but it seems like cheap insurance. For this sling and a previous iteration the d-rings on the top have been super useful in attaching a bag you found after strapping the whole thing down.

Another useful tip from one @tanderson was to buy/make a super long loop strap, girth hitch the buckle end to a boat d-ring near the corner of the sling and the long strap end to the opposite side, then weave the long strap between sling d-rings and boat d-rings until you get to the buckle. Clear as mud?
 

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Awesome workspace, it would be great to have that giant table adjacent to the machine but not happening in the current house. Spare bedroom works for now.

What are the two machines on the very end?
 

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Cool old machine! After making some mesh tote bags recently I was wishing I had a cylinder arm machine for the top edge webbing.

I did end up buying a swing away binder from Sailrite (likely made by Suisei) and holy shit what a time saver, I can't believe I did so much binding by hand...binding by hand suuuuucks.

So many quesions...
  • Is the "cylinder" by the thumb screw some sort of binding routing thingy?
  • Binding attachments are readily available?
  • Is the machine in time?
 

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In this instance the motor is what is called a "clutch" motor, it has one speed (fast as hell) and continuously spins. No electronic control at all. When you push on the foot pedal the clutch plates (traditionally cork and one obviously spinning) start to rub on each other. Then what usually happens is the machine goes from 0 to 50000 rpm in an instant. Adjusting the clutch throw can help but they are much more difficult to control than a servo setup. My machine came with a clutch motor and I could use it but it was noisy and not forgiving at all. Heavy too.

I suppose you could think of a servo motor "package" as a variable speed drive with a controller (closed loop.) For hobby/home use they offer much more control. My cheap-ass servo setup has a bit of a jerky start but I have gotten used to that, I haven't taken it apart but I now wonder if it's actually using a closed loop stepper.

Basically for home use the servo motor is quiet, controllable (fast or slow) and saves electricity.

Note that this is all my semi-educated opinion.
 

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Lol, toxic bellends...

I bet a treadmill motor would be higher quality than the crap I got from Amazon with the Consew label slapped on.

Made a copy of the Down River crossbar bag recently, holds the sand stake, k-pump, DB hammer and stern line, used a giant #15 zipper. It hangs from crossbar with 3/4" straps - used cheap 5/8" brass grommets, larger grommets/install tools are pretty expensive.
Automotive lighting Musical instrument accessory Bumper Wood Automotive exterior


Musical instrument accessory Bicycle part Bumper Automotive exterior Triangle


Interesting and kinda complicated design by @GeoRon - it took some time to reverse engineer it and a lot of thought about dimensions...

Simplified steps:

  • Create rectangle assembly that includes seam in Phifertex Plus sewn to zipper on each end and 1" webbing on either side of zipper
  • Teardrop shaped end pieces are sewn to the rectangle assembly (including pvc or hypalon protective liner) inside out after being careful to offset the assembly for upcoming 1.5" top webbing piece
  • Assembly flipped right side out and top 1.5" webbing sewn on the top-front
  • Grommets installed
 

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I did similar, but just made mine slightly longer than needed...skipped the teardrop ends and just made it "envelope" style.
I'll have to find a pic.

the bags that come with K-pumps are an awful design. K-pump needs to ship a bag like these, even though they'd cost a bit more.
I had made one of those early on too, I just hated how hard it was to zip up when it was full. Just went looking in the DIY thread for it and was reminded of the beautiful oar locks you designed, wow:

Funny thing is that I just bought some Sawyer Canyon locks that look like a version of your design!
 
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