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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone else had issues breaking the Sawyer Dynalite oar blades? I have chipped, cracked, bent, and otherwise destroyed a number of Carlisle and Cataract oar blades, but I've never had any of those two brands snap outright like I have with now 2 of the Sawyer Dynalite blades. I thought I really liked the design and feel of the blades vs. the other brands, and I liked the fact that they won't chip out (shark bite) like the others, but after snapping a 2nd one (at $175 per each) with the exact same break as the other, I'm thinking I may be better off with a cheaper blade that can better take abuse. Design flaw or simply user error?

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Its interesting they are breaking at the exactly point where the most leverage/stress would occur if cranked on while stuck on a rocky shoal or wedged between something as are floating by for example. Sure, I've broken a few lesser blades...but my Squaretops have taken some brutal punishment with aplomb, so might disagree with the idea of a defect (esp if happened 2x). Carbon fiber wrapped over wood is pretty damn robust, so what shafts are you using and where exactly are you boating bud?
 

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That oar blade appears pretty beat up, how long was that blade in service before it broke? It does look like it was under some serious stress when it went. There is also a lot of wear very high on the blade which is confusing unless it is from transport.

Where do you boat that your oar blades get this much abuse?
 
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Breakage is always unfortunate, whether accidental or due to misuse/abuse. I don't see any visible defects in the wood, so the first point of evaluation is the mode of damage, as mentioned already. Using blades & shafts as levers to get unstuck, etc is typically the biggest cause of breakage, behind dragging oars behind the trailer & traveling with oars unsecured/lashed to frames.

We will evaluate products within one year from point of purchase for materials defects. Of course, age of product and how they became broken are important. Tell me more!

WARRANTY POLICY

The Sawyer Guarantee: Any defect that is not due to misuse, abuse, accident or neglect will be repaired or replaced. We guarantee our paddle and oar products against defect in materials or workmanship for one year.

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Ive seen more fold mid blade than break there. Almost always from levering in-between/off of rocks or from a flip where unknown heavy forces were applied. Only you can decide if it was user error. They arent pry bars. If you have admittedly trashed a bunch of blades, I'd assume you know the answer. You gotta stop putting all that ass into the oars and row like a 100lber. Let the water do the work and finess that shiiit!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the feedback. I've only used Sawyers on 2 multi-day trips with rented rafts so I have little experience with them overall. One trip was a late season Middle Fork Salmon, the other a late season Main Salmon, and both trips ended up a snapped blade.

The first time was purely my fault, lazy kayaker style floating the raft sideways in shallow water and inadvertently drug the downstream oar. On last week's trip I wasn't rowing, the rower had the raft pointed downstream and was trying to get final line up for a shallow Big Mallard sneak and a big snap at the wrong moment.

Where the break on both blades is nearly identical yet the situation was different, I had to find out if it was a fluke or a common theme. Seems it was a fluke.

As for being hard on oar blades, I blame it on running low water manky runs and me a wanna be raft rower who has more finesse in a kayak. The damage is always inflicted on low water manky runs (Colorado, Idaho) and as noted above I've damaged a number of blades from annoying shark bites, chucks broken off a tip, to bent Carlisle blades and more, but none of the Carlisle or Cataracts blades have snapped at the shaft.

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Thanks for the feedback. I've only used Sawyers on 2 multi-day trips with rented rafts so I have little experience with them overall. One trip was a late season Middle Fork Salmon, the other a late season Main Salmon, and both trips ended up a snapped blade.

The first time was purely my fault, lazy kayaker style floating the raft sideways in shallow water and inadvertently drug the downstream oar. On last week's trip I wasn't rowing, the rower had the raft pointed downstream and was trying to get final line up for a shallow Big Mallard sneak and a big snap at the wrong moment.

Where the break on both blades is nearly identical yet the situation was different, I had to find out if it was a fluke or a common theme. Seems it was a fluke.

As for being hard on oar blades, I blame it on running low water manky runs and me a wanna be raft rower who has more finesse in a kayak. The damage is always inflicted on low water manky runs (Colorado, Idaho) and as noted above I've damaged a number of blades from annoying shark bites, chucks broken off a tip, to bent Carlisle blades and more, but none of the Carlisle or Cataracts blades have snapped at the shaft.

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I had one break in the exact spot earlier this summer on its 4th use. It got wedged between the rock wall and the boat in Wallslammer. Even if that is the weak point on the blade I was glad it was there and not on the oar shaft its self.
 

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That's where they always break. Why do you people keep using (and making) take-apart oars? Over 1000 years of oars and all of a sudden, interchangeable blades are necessary?

In all my time boating, this break, on Sawyer oars, is the one that I have seen the most. It is not something that I have seen when the ash runs from your fingers to the tip of the blade. Laminate, or solid, wooden oars break - but they make sure you know you fucked up when they do.
 

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That's where they always break. Why do you people keep using (and making) take-apart oars? Over 1000 years of oars and all of a sudden, interchangeable blades are necessary?
Couple reasons: 1. Poverty. With the same shafts, I can go from 8.5 to 9.75' with extenders, and different brands of blades. 2. Variable conditions. I don't worry about banging up carlisle blades or using them as levers on low water MFS or Selway-type runs. Oh well if they get shark bites. But I sure do enjoy my dynelites in bigger water. Also, my boat definitely needs shorter oars when carrying a ton of weight, whereas I'd be rowing over my head with the same set up on a day trip.
 

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Couple reasons: 1. Poverty. With the same shafts, I can go from 8.5 to 9.75' with extenders, and different brands of blades. 2. Variable conditions. I don't worry about banging up carlisle blades or using them as levers on low water MFS or Selway-type runs. Oh well if they get shark bites. But I sure do enjoy my dynelites in bigger water. Also, my boat definitely needs shorter oars when carrying a ton of weight, whereas I'd be rowing over my head with the same set up on a day trip.
Those seem like good reasons! I think if I was trying to turn a set of oars into a quiver, I'd buy Cataracts.

As far as poverty goes, I was broke AF the last time I rowed the Grand and didn't break my wooden oars. I was also broke AF on the trip where I broke a Sawyer like this. The latter hurt more...
 

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Love that warranty by Sawyer. They left out acts of God NOT covered ! As stated above, I broke two dynalites. Send second back to Sawyer. They could have cared less . I agree with post about reading river so that you do not have to row much. However when you have to save your ass, you want stuff to work.
 

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I disagree on the value of nice oars. Oars are the one thing for me that spending the money on is absolutely worth it. Could be my torn up shoulders and elbows but it is a HUGE difference. So much so that if I know I have to row a boat a bunch, such as going fishing with an out of town buddy where we're using his boat, I'll bring my oars if I know he has Carlisles or something. Call it snobby if you will but its the difference in me having a good time or being miserable half way through the day.

The set of square tops on my fishing rig have literally thousands of miles on them. Most of them low bony water backstroking all day and I haven't gone easy on them. Hard to tell if its the best money Ive every spent, but its got to be close..
 
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