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I'm getting some better oars. I've use oars with rope wrap and sleeves, but it doesn't seem like a huge difference. Whats the big deal with rope? Thanks
 

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I'm getting some better oars. I've use oars with rope wrap and sleeves, but it doesn't seem like a huge difference. Whats the big deal with rope? Thanks

IMO it is just quieter. I have run both and functionally that is the only real difference I noticed.
 

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I found that adjusting the position of the stop is less dangerous (or at least easier) with the rope wrap and rubber doughnut stop -- with the sleeve, I stabbed my thumb trying to use a flathead screwdriver to keep the nut from spinning while turning the bolt with another screwdriver! YMMV! I should not be allowed near sharp objects.
 

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They are quieter, have better feel, grip or "bite" the oarlocks better once you load them up and they look cool.
good point, after reading your post I remember that they do seem to "lock in" to the oarlock better under pressure. and don't tend to slide in/out as easily....and they definitely look cooler.
 

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As zbaird said rope, if done right, has a stickier feel in the locks. Sleeves tend to spin in the lock easier. My preference is rope and cobra locks FWIW. Rope tends to grip the lock and not let the blade cant during the power portion of the stroke. Now the rest of the buzz will probably have a tech hissy fit but I use 10' cataract shafts and (OMG) Carlisle 8" outfitter blades. This is for pushing an AIRE Jag. This boat has taken me down the Grand, Main, Gates, and many others. Now I also have other boats. One with pins and clips and one with locks and sleeves. I really like the rope, stoppers, and brass locks. It just feels good and lets you feather as you want and wont spin during the needed power stroke. But this is just my opinion.
Mark
 

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As zbaird said rope, if done right, has a stickier feel in the locks. Sleeves tend to spin in the lock easier. My preference is rope and cobra locks FWIW. Rope tends to grip the lock and not let the blade cant during the power portion of the stroke. Now the rest of the buzz will probably have a tech hissy fit but I use 10' cataract shafts and (OMG) Carlisle 8" outfitter blades. This is for pushing an AIRE Jag. This boat has taken me down the Grand, Main, Gates, and many others. Now I also have other boats. One with pins and clips and one with locks and sleeves. I really like the rope, stoppers, and brass locks. It just feels good and lets you feather as you want and wont spin during the needed power stroke. But this is just my opinion.
Mark
Interesting, I have run NRS brass locks and rope wrap for most of my time boating, but a lot of my fishing buddies have sleeves and I really have never noticed an issue with ease of spin.... until last year, I added cobra's and brand new rope wrap to my rig last year and it's a whole different ball game. They don't spin well enough for my tastes, I've tried waxing the wrap, opening the locs a bit more and they're still too stiff (rotationally) for me. love every thing else about the setup, but I'm actually considering ditching the cobra's...

I typically don't row against the stop on any of my oars. I like the stop way inside so I can adjust how much oar I have in or out of the lock... that came from my old drift boat where I'd have to slide sideways on the seat to balance the boat due to the fishermen standing way off center. When I did that, I'd need one the oars to shift position to match my hands.

I have always liked the quietness of the rope wrap over sleeves, but usually I'm just focused on how tired my lats are from holding up the weight of the non-counterbalanced oars my friends all use.
 

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Cobras have a little to much surface area for my tastes as well. I like regular brass locks and rope wrap. The wrap spins fine until it is under tension and then it bites, which I like.
Damn, I was hoping you'd say "put some XYZ on the wrap and you'll be set". I tried some nice spring yellow ski wax and it's better but not great.

Interestingly my 8 year old wraps work fine in the cobras, hardly a noticeable difference. It's the new chit from sawyer, feels like sandpaper. I was hoping it would start breaking down or get "filled" with brass powder by now. I might keep trying stuff because I really like the vertical throw the cobras have.
 

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Nothing like well seasoned rope wrap. They will get brass on them with use. Good excuse to get out more.

You could always bring them out here and row me around fishing. That'll break the wrap in in a hurry.

I guess you could try some 303. That will make anything slicker than snot.
 

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Not that I'd mind rowing you around to fish, but I get out quite a bit, they've got 80+ days on them. I really thought they'd loosen up more by now. Might have to try the 303 - but is the wrap considered fabric? Not sure I should risk it :rolleyes:
 

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I guess it all depends on how you work the oars. I learned a long time ago that there are power rowers and finesse oarsmen(women). When I was young and strong I wanted to beat the river into a froth with my power strokes and get the river to do what I wanted it to do. Then back in the early 90's I watched a lady row a stretch of big water and how few strokes she took and how perfectly she made that run. It turned my thinking and rowing around. She did it with rope wraps and open locks, in an 18' Rogue(not many of you will remember that beautiful orange boat) and she styled it. I had the pleasure of talking to her later and she gave me the best advice on rowing style I have ever gotten. But that's another story. Rope and cobras are the way to go if you want to feel the water and be able to feather. Standard brass locks tend to chew up rope due to the small surface area that they bite into. Cobras, in my opinion, are a better feel on the oar and the water. Sleeves tend to spin too easily for my liking, but I use big blades. I would love to try shole? cuts and see how they handle with rope wraps. Anyway, Use what works best for you, it's all good, and it's another day on the water.
Mark
 

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You'd think 80 days would have seasoned them up. That cobra brass must be hard. Maybe polish the hell out of the cobras. I have run with a guy whos will blind you when the sun hits them.

I guess regular locks would beat on the rope a little more but the sawyer rope holds up pretty well especially if it is tight and set in epoxy. The first oars I wrapped have got to have 300+ days on them and they are just starting to show wear. I bet I get 500 days out of them. I can deal with that kind of lifespan.


The shoal cuts are cool. I like rowing with them fishing. They scoop the water nicely and you can get a real bite even in shallow water. My buddy rows nothing but shoal cuts/cobras/wrap and swears by them in all kinds of water.
 

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Interesting, I have run NRS brass locks and rope wrap for most of my time boating, but a lot of my fishing buddies have sleeves and I really have never noticed an issue with ease of spin.... until last year, I added cobra's and brand new rope wrap to my rig last year and it's a whole different ball game. They don't spin well enough for my tastes, I've tried waxing the wrap, opening the locs a bit more and they're still too stiff (rotationally) for me. love every thing else about the setup, but I'm actually considering ditching the cobra's...

I typically don't row against the stop on any of my oars. I like the stop way inside so I can adjust how much oar I have in or out of the lock... that came from my old drift boat where I'd have to slide sideways on the seat to balance the boat due to the fishermen standing way off center.
The biggest difference for me between a plastic sleeve and a rope wrap is length. The plastic sleeves sitting on my shelf have about 9 1/2 inches between the end of the sleeve and the stopper. My rope wraps have 16-17 inches between the end of the wrap and the stopper. Like Elkhaven, I learned to row in a drift boat and I don't row on the stoppers. Sometimes I grip the oar handles, but I also often pull the oars in a bit and grip the oar shaft next to the handle and as a result, I use the entire length of the wrap.

Ditto on the Cobras. I bought a pair, used them once and now they live on a shelf. They grab the oar way too much.
 

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Just get you some pro-loks and you wont need either. Then you can run open for feathering or locked in the heavy stuff. And your oars will be there for you when you re flip. Its also the cheapest of the three options
 

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So spider your still loving the pro-locks a year in. Did they ever get the shrink wrap thing dialed in? Kind of seems to me the best thing out there, best of both worlds plus in a catastrophic fu they will release and possibly save a spendy oar shaft.
 

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I've got well over 1000 miles between my 18' gear boat and my cat (lodore, MFS, Lower salmon, two selways, 250 miles on the lochsa, high water Gallatin, Belt, smith, bear trap, bitterroot, Yellowstone, upper main) and yes I do believe they are the best option out there. The new shrink wrap works very well.

I've also had them upside down at least 4 times and my oars stayed in place every time.

I've had them for two and a half seasons.
 

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Rope wrap an oar for $5. Buy a plastic sleeve $15 (used to be $3.50 until they spun off that product). Rope is quiet and doesn't slide like the plastic. In a quiet canyon, one can hear the plastic banging on the oarlock for a mile or more.>>noise pollution
 
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