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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Coming from my old sleeved Carlisle oars I’ve bought unwrapped 9.5’ Cataract SGG’s and I’m doing the wraps myself using 5mm polyester diamond braid. I used spray adhesive on the shaft to keep the rope in place and was able to keep about 20lbs of tension on the rope as I wound it.

For 9.5’ oars, Cataract recommends starting the wrap at 22” from the inside of the grip (29” from grip end) and doing a 20” wrap.

To me, this seems way overkill. Is there any reason to wrap them that high? I see no reason to wrap more than 2-3” above my oar stops, which will be at about the 38” mark. Which makes my wraps start at 26” mark

In summary:

Cataract: 20” wrap starting at 22” from handle
Me: 18” wrap starting at 26” from handle.

image-2021-06-07-04:16:24-447.jpg


Maybe this is a dumb question, but I don’t know what I don’t know and didn’t want to learn the hard way that I’ve made a mistake.

Before I set these in resin, I was just looking for some input from the hive-mind.

Thanks in advance.
 

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As long as you have 8-10 inches at the blade end of where you will set your stop you should be fine (extra wrap on the handle side is useless). The extra wrap is to provide a "ramp" when you pull the oars in and still row, or lets the lock glide up and over when you put them in until the stop is engaged.

BTW, old school we used wraps of seat belt webbing for both wraps and stops... free at the junkyard, and usually three wraps of 2 inch webbing were enough. Rope is nicer, but doesn't last any longer...

The reason Sawyer and others run such long wraps is to (1) sell more rope, and (2) accommodate placement of the stops at various places to fit different width boats/different width between stops. It's definitely not needed if you know where your stops are going...
 

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Forgot to say "nice job" - they look good. As with many things, you won't know how well they work until you've put a few hundred miles on 'em... 20# of tension should be just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you. Just what I needed to know. I think I’ll actually shorten my wrap to 16” to save time and rope on the remaining 3 shafts.

I toyed with the idea of polyester webbing because I’ve got miles of various webbings for my side business. I couldn’t really think of a clean termination to the webbing wrap though. I’ll stick with rope for now.

What do you finish the rope with?

I was just going to thin some cheap epoxy with acetone to promote absorption.
 

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Before there was epoxy, there was polyester - and it was half as expensive. Works fine. Anything you have on hand that will harden and can take the water and UV exposure.

I've got some 40+ year old South Branch ash oars - weigh like 9000 lbs. - that I used webbing and Marine Tex on, I'll find 'em and take some photos. They're like steel sleeves now, I'm going to have to use a grinder to remove if I ever want to put 'em back in service.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The polyester resin idea occurred to me right after I typed that question. Looks like I’ll be picking up some bondo this week.

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Ended up with 16” wraps.

I masked off the shafts and used 3M 90 high tack spray adhesive to coat the shafts and keep the rope in place. Used my 48” long saw horses to roll the shafts on. I had my spool of rope on a dowel between the stretchers on my horses so it would just spoil off as I pulled.

After I wrapped and finished the ends, I used half a spray can per oar of spar urethane varnish to basically soak the rope.

I then mixed a little epoxy and coated the end of the wraps to lock them in place on the shaft.

I’m very pleased with how they came out

IMG_8892.jpg
 

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You should be (pleased)! Those are great!

However, one thing I've learned is that looks are not the same as results... until you get some miles on 'em you won't know how they perform. They can still separate - 20# should be enough stretch to put on the rope, but you never know.
I'd grease up the "collar" (next to the stop, where they rub on the lock) with plenty of paraffin or bees wax, and rotate 'em so your first few miles of wear are evenly distributed.

Nice job!
 
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