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Anyone have a good design to retrofit a Sanford and Son, wood trailer with a roller to make loading/unloading easier? The trailer has wood side rails and cross members so I could attach almost anything (and have in the past).
 

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Search for "trailer roller" . think it was El Falco (or Meng) that had a nice removeable setup. Northern Tools Supply (something like that)...and Harbor Freight sold 20" long rollers $15 each (get 3-4 of them). i am gonna pursue this during the winter.
 

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Mike,
I have simliar sounding trailer. I started using a piece of PVC pipe that sits loosely under the raft. Definitly Sanford and Son like, but works pretty well and is simple.
Arn
 

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Sounds like Arn's got the winner for low tech - if it was good enough for the Egyptians then why not for us?

I've got a really good roller setup that Marshall did for me when he still had his fab shop but... The best, low-cost, and simplest fixed-mount option I've seen is a steel pipe with a slightly larger PVC pipe as a sleeve over it. One moving part, water won't hurt it, slight warping isn't a problem, etc. I've even seen a setups like this ranging from 4" steel pipe to one using 1" galvanized pipe.

Doubtless you could rig this up so it could be bolted on in Feb. when the Salt season starts and taken off in November at the end of the season after you get back from Big Bend, that way you'd have the trailer to do home improvement projects with during the rest of the year. :)
 

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The best designs I've seen are the fixed pipe with a large floating piece of PVC over it. The PVC does the rolling. I've seen one large 6' long 3" Al pipe with 2 elbows mounting it to the trailer at the rear and then the PVC is slide over the Al pipe before assembly allowing for the rolling. I've also seen it done with 2 shorter rollers just under the tubes (won't slide as much at the start).
 

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nice good beta. I was wondering how to get the roll with the stiffness. Now I know. PVC over aluminum pipe. I'll take a photo of my ghetto trailer when I am done. thanks.
 

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I even saw two rolling pins once, had to laugh but I am sure it worked. Funny thing is I came up with the pipe and PVC all on my own before I saw it listed here then had to cut my trailer down so it was lower and no tailgate w/roller. Now I have two 24" wide 16' long carpeted plywood planks for my cat-a-slug and I'm thinking about two seterate rollers one for each side and I may engineer them to fold but then again once the taper it over them it doesn't matter. At one point my 24" planks pivoted on hinges to make them the side walls of my trailer so I could use it better to haul stuff not related to the Cat-a-Slug.
 

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Might try PVC over square tubing. Less friction involved so the PVC rolls easier. The PVC only touchs at the four corners of the square tubing and since the tubing is square its easier to bolt to a flat surface.
 

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I found press in bearings at the hardware store that fit 1 inch and a quarter emt tubing perfectly. Drilled holes in both flat sides of 2 inch angle cut to about two inches and mounted it to the rear frame of trailer. I used two inch hex head bolts and two nuts on each side of the angle to lock in the bearings. Plenty stiff and cost about 15 bucks.
 

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Anyone have a good design to retrofit a Sanford and Son, wood trailer with a roller to make loading/unloading easier? The trailer has wood side rails and cross members so I could attach almost anything (and have in the past).
brewer welding....rodney builds the best damn roller you'll find....221-1916
 

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I bought my rollers from Trailer parts superstore, it is also where I buy most of my trailer parts, they are inexpensive and quick. My is for a cat but have a friend that used the same rollers for a raft and they work great.

shop.easternmarine.com/
 

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I finally got some photos of the roller on my trailer. It's made out of an old roller from a RV awning. In the last photo, you can also see the rollers on the upper side decks for the cat.

FYI, my 14 ft. SB will slide onto the bottom deck with a winch. I also use the winch to get the cat on top. If I'm only hauling the cat, I can drop the side decks down about 7 in.



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willpaddle4food
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Fabricating roller bearings

Spent a while reading all the trailer mojo and finally decided to go ahead and make a roller bearing as described. Turned out to be pretty easy, although the pictures may help clarify it. The roller bearing that fits into 1&1/4 EMT conduit is 1&3/8 OD, and cost about $5 each. They come in a variety of sizes of internal hole, but 9/16 ID worked well in this application
If you use a pipe cutter to cut the conduit it will compress it just enough to make pressing the bearing in more difficult, so I'd advise sawing it. Cut it a bit long.
Rather than fabricate an elbow, I chose to buy gate hardware (again, about $5 each) to put on the rollers. Since I was mounting it in wood, I just drilled a 1/2 hole and slipped the bolt in, and tightened from below. Tightening the top nut allows you to raise or lower the bar a bit. I first mounted the conduit to one side, then, before putting the gate hardware through the wood of the trailer, I slipped it into the conduit, and then lowered the bolt down into the pilot hole.
 

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Nice job on the roller install, simple and clean. I've installed quite a few rollers on peoples trailers using the above mentioned radial bearings and would like to suggest a couple of things for anybody interested. The first, and probably the most helpful, being the use of gas pipe, usually available at the same hardware store you get the bearings. The gas pipe is just schedule 40 steel pipe, and doesn't flex nearly as bad as emt does with a loaded boat. The second being a light coat of jb weld applied to the interior of the pipe and a little on the bearing surface below the retaining lip. The jb weld will keep the bearings from rattling loose out of the pipe over time and dirt roads. Never used gate hardware before, but it looks good. I've always used steel or aluminum plates, depending on the trailer, on the outside that I drilled and tapped for 1/2" by 13 thread bolts. The bearing rides on the bolt on the inside of the plate, and is easily taken out by removing one bolt. Hope it helps.
 

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willpaddle4food
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You're right about the JB weld I think. Because I had to cut the pipe a second time, it was a little short, and the bearings wanted to come loose (It took absolutely no skill, tools, or strength to push those bearings in - snug easy fit.) I taught myself how to spotweld today, but then I had to grind off the sharp spots on the conduit/bearing interface. Would have been simpler to use JB Weld. Damnit! Why didn't you post that earlier?

Looking at the job now, I see that it cost about $30, and it would have been better if I'd used two different lengths of pipe to handle the load, which would have cost about $50 total. It's just for a 12foot cat, so I think in this case it'll work. Doesn't that black gas pipe a) rust and, b) weigh a ton?
 
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