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I'm certain Senor D that you don't own an AIRE bladder boat. But I just want to confirm that sucking the air out of an AIRE is a bad idea. Can anyone confirm that?
I can't confirm, but I've been sucking air out my Aire for years with zero issues. It allows me to roll it up much easier and smaller.
 

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NRS boat bags are another solid option. When I look at all the marks on the exterior of that bag, I'm glad my tubes are inside during trailer transit. It has a mesh strip around several sides for ventilation and a nice big clear exterior pocket where I store cam straps for rigging frame to tubes.
 

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NRS boat bags are another solid option. When I look at all the marks on the exterior of that bag, I'm glad my tubes are inside during trailer transit. It has a mesh strip around several sides for ventilation and a nice big clear exterior pocket where I store cam straps for rigging frame to tubes.
If I'm rolling up my boat wet I unroll it when i get home anyway... I think I'd rather have something tougher than mesh on all sides.

I'm leaning towards buying a large canvas tarp for maximum abrasion resistance. I can dry the tarp out at home too.
 

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RMR's come with a bag for a reason, because I told the owner it was a great idea. . . . I am always amazed at how many RMR's I get that people don't use the bag they were given.
So, I've rolled a lot of boats (20 yrs guiding), and had boat bags from different companies (incl. Sotar and RMR) and, I'm sorry, but I've NEVER been able to get a boat back into the boat bags the manufacturer sends. I typically get a tighter roll than the other guides I work alongside, and they still don't fit. Maybe that's why nobody every uses the bags. . .they're just too damn small.
 

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So, I've rolled a lot of boats (20 yrs guiding), and had boat bags from different companies (incl. Sotar and RMR) and, I'm sorry, but I've NEVER been able to get a boat back into the boat bags the manufacturer sends. I typically get a tighter roll than the other guides I work alongside, and they still don't fit. Maybe that's why nobody every uses the bags. . .they're just too damn small.
True, don't count on the OEM bag working after use. But you can count on your rolled boat getting damaged without a cover unless you exercise proper care. Maybe the best use of the OEM bag is to put it beneath the rolled boat (laid not on the creased edges) and the rest of the pile of gear. So never put a load on creased edges and always protect your boat from pointy things during transport.
 

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A decent roll on a RMR will get it 90+% covered. A real good roll can get it 100% in the bag. When they come out of the box they are only using about 75% of the bag. Andy H's old SOTAR would fit in its bag wonderfully with a decent roll. Maybe you just think you know how to roll a boat ;)


Even if it won't fit all the way, as long as you get the creased up edges covered you are way ahead of the curve.
 

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Since I've always trailered my boats I don't pretend to know how to roll it. Well, not always but I love trailering my inflated and rigged boats now.

If you have one creased edge up, the other creased edge will be down. So, creased edges should be out, perpendicular to the center of the earth.

Put your boat always on top, creased edges outward. Never have pointy or hard things next to your rolled boat. Pad the bottom side of your boat if necessary. Lash it tight after following the mentioned procedure so that it stationary and all should be fine and you don't even need a bag.
 
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