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Has anyone else had the problem of wet sandals picking up sand and abrading the hell out of ankles and toes? Has anyone found a solution to this problem that doesn't involve going barefoot on hot beaches or having to carry other gear?

I ended up with huge holes in my feet last year that took a long time to heal. Currently I'm wearing Chacos but my Tevas did it as well. I've considered springing for the custom Chacos and having the "post" strap that runs under the foot ankle to ankle shortened, but that would put the heel strap at a weird angle and might also make the sandal less secure. Would a wider footbed help? Any ideas?
 

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I'm fortunate, when it comes to sandals. They all work fairly well without major rubbing or wear but I have a number of friends that have serious problems with river foot wear.... Each has stumbled onto their own solution but since feet are so variable I suspect you'll have to try a few things before you find what works unfortunately. I am a chaco fan, but imagine like all shoes different companies model after a different foot, so something else may work better for you.

A few other things come to mind, I run mine very loose, I rarely tighten the upper strap at all, but when I do that's when I find sand in between straps and skin. I only "Lock in the hubs" when hiking or wading fast water. Also I have several pairs of chacos in 2 different sizes and I have places I like each. So you could try going larger or smaller, even just in the store may indicate a critical fit difference. There is a large difference between my 10's and my 11's so bigger will equate to wider, maybe more space between posts and foot...maybe you need less who knows?
 

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I have a terrible time with river foot wear. Whatever brand and style I've tried have rubbed on my feet, heels, or toes. My solution has been socks. Neoprene mostly, or light weight running socks. I'd love to be able to go"naked" in river sandals, but I just can't. Once I get to camp, I strip off the nasty hot neoprene and dive into my crocs...one of the only sandals I can use with bare feet. I feel your pain. Hope you can find an answer.
 

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The only time I have seen this is when someone doesn't wear river sandals off the river.

Do you wear them only on the rio?
 

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Has anyone else had the problem of wet sandals picking up sand and abrading the hell out of ankles and toes? Has anyone found a solution to this problem that doesn't involve going barefoot on hot beaches or having to carry other gear?

I ended up with huge holes in my feet last year that took a long time to heal. Currently I'm wearing Chacos but my Tevas did it as well. I've considered springing for the custom Chacos and having the "post" strap that runs under the foot ankle to ankle shortened, but that would put the heel strap at a weird angle and might also make the sandal less secure. Would a wider footbed help? Any ideas?
I ended up putting duct tape over the "post" strap as an emergency measure on one trip. It worked so well that I left it for two years and even did it to the same strap on the other foot. For whatever reason, that is the only place that rubs.
 

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In camp don't wear anything wet on your feet.
Something really comfortable and dry.

Sleep with bare feet. No socks.

Loose smart wool socks is certainly the smart thing to do on the river.

For sores in that environment go early on with what they put on cow udders.

Bag Balm.

There's moleskin and duct tape and bandaids and change your socks three times a day. I used to treat blisters in fire camps. I've recovered from that stress. All better now.

Bag Balm is not appreciated by our generation.
You could fix that.

Bag Balm in your med kit.
Since 1899, Bag Balm has been the farmer's friend helping keep dairy cows from becoming chapped


=========

The advice to wear stuff off the river that you will later wear on is very very good.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Carvedog: I wear them pretty much all the time in the summer. The only time I have a problem is when I combine wet sandals with a sandy beach and create instant wearable sandpaper.

Jake, that might work, as the duct tape slick side wouldn't hold the sand as well. I've also considered just putting the tape on my feet before the hotspots appear, while my feet are still dry.
 

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I have the same problem so I wear neoprene booties while boating, scouting and until I have un packed the boat. When I'm done getting in and out of the boat I switch to socks and sneakers. I'm still looking for a better solution.
 

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I suffer from deep, deep fissures in my heals. Not wearing sandals is my best solution but rarely practical. I always bring hiking shoes and socks for layover days and as an option for day hikes if I'm in the middle of disintegration mode. I like "Udderly Smooth" as a greaseless version of bag balm. Last resort is super glue.
 

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Supper Glue and Duct tape….Pathetic but what are
you going to do?




I suffer from deep, deep fissures in my heals. Not wearing sandals is my best solution but rarely practical. I always bring hiking shoes and socks for layover days and as an option for day hikes if I'm in the middle of disintegration mode. I like "Udderly Smooth" as a greaseless version of bag balm. Last resort is super glue.
 

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Yes thats what I'm wearing and it solves the abrasion problem but they suck for scouting and I can't wait to get them off in camp. Soggy, Clammy and Hot.

It seems that I always need to make one last trip back to the boat. My 124qt cooler is just too heavy to bring up to camp and that's where the cold beer is.



Have you tried river booties? like Nrs desperados or something like i? theres no straps or rubbing check out what they got Men > Footwear > Water Shoes at nrs.com
 

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I suffer from deep, deep fissures in my heals.
I'll diagnose that over the net as significant athletes foot fungus.

Soak you feet in apple cider (or regular) vinegar diluted at 1:2 with water.

45 minutes while watching the first half Germany-Argentina tomorrow.
You can go extra time as needed.
 

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I'll diagnose that over the net as significant athletes foot fungus.

Soak you feet in apple cider (or regular) vinegar diluted at 1:2 with water.

45 minutes while watching the first half Germany-Argentina tomorrow.
You can go extra time as needed.
I don't ALWAYS have deep, infected, slabbing, oozing and pussing cuts on my heels! Right now they are soft as butter after using Udderly Smooth and wearing shoes and socks as much as possible after a week on the San Juan in 100 degree heat.

Preparing for Deso in a couple weeks and I will bring the balm, the super glue, and perhaps apple cider vinegar. Maybe I'll whip up a fantastic potato salad!
 

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crocs will solve your problem.
i only wear Crocs in camp. I don't think they're a very secure sandal for in the boat.
 

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I suffer from cracked heels, all the way down to the pink meat, if I don't give my feet proper attention. I live in my Chaco's as much as possible. Buy one of those goofy infomercial PedEggs and cheese grate all that dead skin off your heels and feet. Sand smooth when done with the little sandpaper disk they provide. Then use a ton of the Okeefe's healthy feet (or whatever its called), put on dry socks over, and you have new feet in the morning. And Superglue of course. NRS had ankle high neoprene socks that work well with Chacos, just stand on the toe loop if you go that way. Too many hours in my NRS zip up booties and I get trench foot. If you're rafting, wading boots with wading socks/gravel guards are the best.
 
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