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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live at the rather perilous intersection of self-proclaimed foodie and househusband that allows me to experiment way too much with recipes. Luckily my bread-winning wife is not only supportive but also excited for our food explorations. My boating buddies don't complain too much either. As such, I thought I would start a thread to share some of the better, and maybe worst, river menu options we have stumbled across over the years. So.....

Most Reliable Dinner:

Red Posole: Easily made ahead of time, vacuum packed and frozen. Easy option for first couple nights or can be used as ice until needed on a cool night. Peeps seem to love it and you can garnish it however you want. Favorite choice for meat is a bone-in Boston Butt yet any shoulder or butt roast will do. Don't skimp on the chilis and make sure to bring the extra paste for those who love the smokey flavor they bring.

Most Reliable Breakfast:

Breakfast Burritos: Premade, frozen and steamed in the morning (this device has been awesome for the river kitchen's pots).

Best Cooler Is Dead End of Trip Dinner:

Either a dry box curry with all the leftover vegetables and some canned chicken (if needed, which its normally not). Mae Ploy makes a reliable product in whatever flavor you prefer, just cook up some veggies, add a can of coconut milk and voila. Or an easy Asian Cabbage salad served with roasted cashews and whatever flavors you like. Hearty, refreshing on a summer night and no worries about spoilage with durable vegetables to boot.

Most Excited for 2015:

Traditional Ramen! You can make the soup base, tare, and chashu ahead of time. Spectacular flavor and filling meal. We just made a Miso Ramen from the Sapporo region that maybe one of the most satisfying food experiences of my life. How can you go wrong with pork shoulder marinated in soy and sake and then sliced thin, soy marinated eggs, cabbage and scallions? If you haven't had a real ramen soup in your life you are missing out. The base is so unique and can take as little as 2 hours to make (unlike the Hakata Ramen which can take several days). Definitely a fringe season winner. Premake some gyoza up ahead of time, quickly cook them, serve on the side and you will have people begging for more.

Anybody have success stories, absolute failures or excitement for a new recipe to add to their rotation?

Phillip
 

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Most Reliable Dinner:
Red Posole: Easily made ahead of time, vacuum packed and frozen. Easy option for first couple nights or can be used as ice until needed on a cool night. Peeps seem to love it and you can garnish it however you want. Favorite choice for meat is a bone-in Boston Butt yet any shoulder or butt roast will do. Don't skimp on the chilis and make sure to bring the extra paste for those who love the smokey flavor they bring.
Phillip
The link didn't work for me.
Is it similar to this?
Pozole is a special occasion dish in Mexico, especially in Guerrero State. Restaurants called pozolerías specialize in it. This dish is a well known cure for hangovers and is often eaten in the wee hours of the morning as a preventive. Pozole is also popular in New Mexico, where it is usually spelled posole.
Pozole Recipe (Mexican pork and hominy stew) | Whats4eats
 

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Here's my favorite Posole recipe. I've modified it over the years but it is perfect for warm lunches in a thermos or dinner, with corn or flour tortillas.

I generally triple or quadruple the ingredients and freeze the extra. The amounts are pretty general. I'm a throw-whatever-sounds/smells-good-into-the-pot chef and don't spend much time with actual measurements.

Heavy stock pot (or Large Oval Crock Pot)
and a Medium Large Skillet if using a crock pot to stew in.
Garlic, garlic and more garlic (about 8 cloves, peeled & chopped)
Onion, onion and more onion (3-4 onions depending on size, chopped)
Oregano (flakes) – (2 tablespoons or so)
Flour (for dredging the pork).
Olive Oil –(about 1/4 cup).
2-3 T Canola Oil
Butter – The Real Deal (1/2 stick).
Pork for Stewing (about 1.5 pounds - more if you want, cut into 3/4 inch cubes).
2 large cans (49.5 oz. each) Swanson's chicken stock
1 bag Refrigerated or Frozen "half-processed" Posole (NOT dry, NOT canned), wash it good and pick out the bad ones.
4 to 8 Dried Chipotle Pods (NOT canned!) – Use about 4 for a mild posole, 6 for medium and 8 for hot... The chipotles need time to release their essence, which is why this is always better and richer the next day. If you don't have dried chipotle, then the canned in adobo can work - just make sure that you don't use any other type of red chile

Dredge the pork in flour, then brown in stock pot (or skillet if you'll be using a crock pot) over medium high heat in 2-3 tablespoons canola oil until browned on all sides. Add onions and garlic with olive oil and butter and saute until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the fresh/frozen posole to the onions along with the two large cans of chicken stock, rub the oregano flakes between your hands into the pot and add the chipotle pods. Bring to boil and let simmer, covered, for several hours until the posole pops open. As it simmers, replenish or add water as needed so that it doesn't become too salty. Salt to taste and serve with chopped onions and shredded cheese.

Mmm Mmm. I'm ready for the river.

- Jon
 

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Breakfast burritos - I made mine for our Main trip last summer. What I would do next time is put 2 or 4 each in vacuum sealed bags, and then just boil them in a large crock pot before serving. I tried the same with Zip Loc bags with a few leaks, ruining at least a few bags.
 

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Interesting Posole history

I wasn't familiar with Posole so took a look at the Wikipedia entries.
from Pozole - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia :

Since maize was a sacred plant for the Aztecs and other inhabitants of Mesoamerica, pozole was made to be consumed on special occasions.
The conjunction of maize (usually whole hominy kernels) and meat in a single dish is of particular interest to scholars because the ancient Americans believed the gods made humans out of masa (cornmeal dough).
According to research by the National Institute of Anthropology and History and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, on these special occasions, the meat used in the pozole was human.
After the prisoners were killed by having their hearts torn out in a ritual sacrifice, the rest of the body was chopped and cooked with maize.
The meal was shared among the whole community as an act of religious communion.
After the Conquest, when cannibalism was banned, pork became the staple meat as it "tasted very similar", according to a Spanish priest.

So I guess that means we taste like the other white meat - who knew?
 

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Uhhhhh

I'm good with chicken.

We buy chicken breasts for under 2 bucks a pound and my wife cleans them of everything but meat. Vacuum sealed they own a corner of the freezer.

Those frozen chicken breasts on the river are thawed, marinated in nothing more then an Italian Salad dressing and then BBQ'd.
With a rice dish with veges precut. Key here is SWEET Onions. Aluminum foil wrapped garlic bead next to the BBQ works.

 

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Steaming



Rather than this guy we just use a metal steamer insert, w/folding handles, that fits in a pan.

Steamed veges are soooo much better and easy.
With that gear already its no problem to steam burritos.

=========

Anyone know how hazardous it is to heat vacuum seal bags?
 

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I am a big fan of boil in the bag prepared food from home.

I found out the hard way that you need to keep the bag plastic from touching the metal pot.

Some sort of insert on the pot's inside bottom to separate the bag from the pot bottom and plenty of water (IE don't over load the pot with bags) can help.

No matter what recipe a person uses, pozole is a great river dish.

I appreciate all the recipes.
 

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I wasn't familiar with Posole so took a look at the Wikipedia entries.
from Pozole - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia :
Since maize was a sacred plant for the Aztecs and other inhabitants of Mesoamerica, pozole was made to be consumed on special occasions.
The conjunction of maize (usually whole hominy kernels) and meat in a single dish is of particular interest to scholars because the ancient Americans believed the gods made humans out of masa (cornmeal dough).
According to research by the National Institute of Anthropology and History and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, on these special occasions, the meat used in the pozole was human.
After the prisoners were killed by having their hearts torn out in a ritual sacrifice, the rest of the body was chopped and cooked with maize.
The meal was shared among the whole community as an act of religious communion.
After the Conquest, when cannibalism was banned, pork became the staple meat as it "tasted very similar", according to a Spanish priest.
So I guess that means we taste like the other white meat - who knew?
No wonder I'm not a big pork fan.;)
 

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According to the North Dakota State University (NDSU) Agriculture Communication, some bags are made from plastic that is too thin to boil without melting. They recommend calling the manufacturers of the plastic bag and asking them what the softening point is. NDSU reports that Ziploc brand bags have a softening point of 195 degrees, which means they would melt at boiling point, 212 degrees. This will ruin both the food and the dishes the bags are in.
When plastic is boiled, the chemicals used to produce it can leach into the food being prepared due to a high temperature. Common chemicals in plastic include BPA and phthalates. Harvard Medical School says that high-fat foods are especially susceptible. NDSU adds that some plastic bags will leach toxic fumes from the ink, glue and recycled materials used in making them.
High Fat would be PORK !!
 

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Checking over the FOODSAVER box we use for our vacuum sealer bags.

"Safe for microwave, freezer, refrigerator and simmering."
BPA Free.

======

A couple thoughts.
They could be lying.
The sealing act itself is not simmering. It is meant to melt.
They do not address the chemical(s), phthalates.

Phthalates are the new BPA. From the standpoint of awareness.
 

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Here's my favorite black bean and corn salad recipe in a lime cilantro vinaigrette.

I doubled this for our Main trip and had too much for 18 but I cooked way too much food for that meal and had lots of everything.

Servings: 6-8
Total Time: 30 Minutes
Ingredients

5 15-ounce cans black beans, rinsed and drained
5 cups frozen corn
3 red bell peppers, diced
Cherry/grape tomatoes
4 cloves garlic, minced
4 tablespoons minced shallots, from one medium shallot
4 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper, cumin, chili powder
4 tablespoons sugar
18 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 teaspoon lime zest (be sure to zest limes before juicing them)
12 tablespoons fresh lime juice
1 cup chopped fresh cilantro, plus more for garnish
4 avocados, chopped
Instructions

Combine all ingredients except for avocados in a large bowl and mix well. Right before serving, add avocados and mix gently, being careful not to mash avocados. Garnish with a more chopped cilantro if desired. Serve at room temperature.
 

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Here's how brown rice works best for me. Sounds pretty simple but just a few additions really make this simple side dish really good:

5 cup short grain brown rice
10 cups vegetable broth, canned or homemade (can also use chicken broth)
10 tablespoons unsalted butter
5 (2-inch) strips lemon or orange zest
Kosher salt
Directions
Combine all ingredients in a medium sauce pan with a tight fitting lid, and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to maintain a gentle simmer, cover, and cook for 50 minutes. Don't lift the lid to give a peek or stir or the rice will not cook evenly.
Remove pan from the heat and let the rice sit, covered, for 10 minutes - once again, no peeking. Fluff with a fork and serve.

Reading this makes me wonder why I'm starting a diet for my New Year's resolution????
 

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Here's my all-time favorite guacamole recipe. Borrowed from Gabriel's, Santa Fe, after many "research" trips and much careful observation. Recipe can now be found online at several places so I'm not really giving anything away here.

These are my estimates for 16 -18 people but who know's how much to make? Depends on if it is a meal, or an appetizer I guess

Guacamole recipe

From Gabriels, Santa Fe

16 medium avocados (peeled and pitted)
2 teaspoon crushed garlic
2 teaspoon chopped jalapeno
2 cup chopped tomatoes
8 teaspoon chopped onion
16 teaspoons freshly squeezed lime juice
16 teaspoons chopped cilantro
Salt

Dice avocados, ideally in a 16 ounce molcajete bowl. Add crushed garlic and chopped jalapeno mashing the mix together with a fork and spoon. Add chopped tomatoes, chopped onion and salt to taste. Mix together. Sprinkle with freshly squeezed lime juice, than add chopped cilantro and stir. Serve with tortilla chips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Rather than this guy we just use a metal steamer insert, w/folding handles, that fits in a pan.

Steamed veges are soooo much better and easy.
With that gear already its no problem to steam burritos.
Metal is horrible for non-stick pots and pans so we rarely have them in our kit. In all reality metal utensils are even bad for most metal and cast iron damages the surface which leads to sticking (and loss of natural non-stick qualities of cast iron).

We have largely moved to silicon or bamboo utensils, hence the steamer. We still have some cheapo plastic stuff we eventually need to toss when we can upgrade. Mileage will vary for others based on kitchen set.

Phillip
 

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nice recipes, Ductape! can't wait to try some out when the thaw comes in the spring


After the Conquest, when cannibalism was banned, pork became the staple meat as it "tasted very similar", according to a Spanish priest.

So I guess that means we taste like the other white meat - who knew?
hence the name 'Long Pig' for that particular delicacy!
 

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Metal is horrible for non-stick pots and pans so we rarely have them in our kit. In all reality metal utensils are even bad for most metal and cast iron damages the surface which leads to sticking (and loss of natural non-stick qualities of cast iron).

We have largely moved to silicon or bamboo utensils, hence the steamer. We still have some cheapo plastic stuff we eventually need to toss when we can upgrade. Mileage will vary for others based on kitchen set.

Phillip
I should have been specific.
We use stainless in stainless.

For the non boiling we primarily use cast iron.

We have moved away from non-annodized aluminum.
We are moving away from non-stick.

We are moving away from plastic uses near heat.
Especially after hearing about recently and recently reading about more problems with plastics than I imagined.
 
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