Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Do I need to rinse off my drytop after I get home from the river, or does it not make a difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
I always rinse my gear off, I'm not sure if it helps it any but I like to think it does. I tend to sweat alot on the river and by the time i'm done it smells kinda funny.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,836 Posts
Do I need to rinse off my drytop after I get home from the river, or does it not make a difference?
I suppose it would depend on the type of water you are paddling. If it is close to/downstream of urban areas than yes, I would definitely rinse my gear after use. In areas where you predominately paddle runoff/spring water that is upstream of diversions or multiple reservoirs it shouldn't be an issue.
 

·
KDT
Joined
·
207 Posts
I pretty much always rinse all my gear after each use when possible. I don't think it's necessary but it can't hurt. My stuff also doesn't seem to suffer too badly from the nasty "river funk" smell. It could be coincidence or pure luck but it could also be from the rinsing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
My understanding is that, outside of the obvious ideas of rinsing off chemicals or crud from the river, it prolongs the life of the material to rinse off your oils and sweat. Granted, it does a minute amount since we're talking oil vs. water, but it's a good idea. As oil from your body gets into the cloth it attaches to particles of dirt, which over time and many uses slowly wears away the cloth from the inside on a fiber by fiber basis (the general argument to why one should wash their normal clothes often). Plus, doesn't oil and salt wear out the latex quicker [and sunscreen]?

I also go on the recommendation that once or twice a season (depending on usage) it's a good idea to wash it with a very mild soap to entirely get off the oils. Be very careful about what soap you chose though- harsh soaps can trash many fabrics waterproofness in one washing. Of course treat your gaskets regularly as well.

Cheers,
 

·
KDT
Joined
·
207 Posts
On that note- What soaps do people use and trust for a full cleaning? And do you do this in a washing machine or is it a handwash only kind of thing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
I use 'sport wash.' It's cheaper than most detergents in many places w/o a huge mark up (send me a PM if you can't find it, I have lots). Basically a soap like woolite is good, (though woolite has fragrance, which is an oil, so I recommend against it in general). Lots of kayak shops should have some friendly soap, like Tech wash, though often pricey.

Due to the delicacy of the latex gaskets, this is strictly a handwash-only option. Soak it a while. Can't ever screw up any laundry doing it in cold water. Hang it up in the bathroom to dry after rinsing liberally. Careful as possibly about the gaskets. It's amazing to me how brown the water can turn with just 20 or 30 days of use in one of these.

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Gee, I haven't washed/rinsed my drytop in 10 years. Perhaps that is why my gaskets last longer than everyone else's. The way I see it, the river is rinsing the outside constantly, and the inside is separated from my body by at least 2 layers of fleece, which I wash regularly. I suppose if I didn't wear as many layers, or actually had the capability of sweating while kayaking (I'm always cold) and it started stinking, then I'd rise it in the sink with plain H2O. What I think also keeps it from needing washing is to dry it immediately (just hang dry), and if it is wet inside after kayaking, turn it inside-out so it airs/dries out quickly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
I don't worry about rinsing but I put a plastic conditioner on the gaskets after ever use. Not only does it make the gaskets last but they slip on way easier after each use. You can get the stuff at most kayak shops.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top