Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I opened a gash in the bottom of my Diesel last night and wanted to know if anyone had suggestions for repairing it. It is a two-inch length cut in the middle of the hull. Does anyone have information regarding patch materials, like compounds, glue, tape or possibly a good sticky bubble gum? :cry:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Take it to Confluence Kayaks

I think they are able to repair it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
what I've heard

Mind you, I've never tried this but this is what I've heard. Basicaly it adheres to the old adage if ya can't duck it, then, well you know how it goes. So, I was told you drill a small hole at each end of the crack. Don't be shy with that drill. The boys at the factory were'nt. That keeps the crack from getting bigger. You could put some epoxy in there too for good measure. Next, add layers of duck (duct?) tape and slowly heat the tape with a torch while pressing it down with a plastic spoon. Or something like that. Remember, this is only what I've heard and I'm not responsible if you melt your boat or anything. Ask around. Like this: Has anyone else heard anything about duct tape welding?

Good luck, Mnsr Ex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Tried duct tape welding...only works for a little while...keep in mind that most of these boats are made of polyethylene. Glues, tapes, epoxies, etc... do not bond with polyethylene and eventually come off. Until you actually seal the crack from the outside, by welding the plastic back together, dirt and grit will work its way in and begin to destroy the tape, bitchithane, glue, you've put on the inside. I have 5 ! plastic welds on the bottom of my creek boat...still going!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I have a tank of nitrogen and a hot air welder in my garage. After some practice, and ruining a riot, I got the hang of it. Confluence also repairs boats and they have much more experiance than I do. Try to use an inert gas like nitrogen, not sure about the science of it but I believe it causes way less oxidation and creates a stronger less brittle weld.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Well, my Dad has a machine shop and had a spare hot air welder, there are only about 70 bucks anyway. I gat a tank of Nitrogen from Air Gas in Fort Collins, runs about 20 bucks a tank. Then I ordered polyethylene from McMaster Carr, they are a supply company that can supply pretty much anything. My Cuz, that I used to live with in Denver, had an old Riot Dom that had seen better days. So I welded the hell out it and learned how to make a semi nice bead weld. .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
You can use the polyethylene rods and a hot air gun......$30 buck at home depot. I got the rods from Dagger, that's the boat I've got. You will want to use the same plastic rods as the make of the boat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
Cut strips out of the cockpit rim to ensure plastic match. the longer the better but only about an 1/8 to a 1/4 inch wide. If you can reach the weld back it with some Aluminum tape, the real duck tape. Use a heat gun with a tip that focuses the heat. I have done it with a propane torch but it is a little scary. Start with low heat and keep it moving. Get both the boat and the "Rod" simultaneously to the glistening point, not molten. Do not dally. The longer the heat is applied to the boat the weaker the area will get. Have a putty knife/butter knife to push on it lightly. You want a bead not flat. You might practice with a couple of strips of cockpit rim first and then go for it. I have worked a hull back together that had a stick poking through it. Important point don't push to hard from inside with a stick when doing this.

Peter

PS only works with Linear plastic which I believe the Deisel is.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top