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Discussion Starter #1
They have not released the name yet but I would guess it has to be private due to the forest service stopping commercials after 6000cfs.

Sorry for their loss but always want to learn from these to avoid this possibility on my boat. Just want to figure out the problem other than crazy high water that is damn near freezing.

Life Jackets? Reason for spill? Flip or ejection? Local boater with experience or tourists with a death wish? Intoxication?

Chttp://www.postindependent.com/news/16689846-113/rafter-dies-on-colorado-river-near-grizzly-creek

condolences to the family...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
fast and pushy

I have to assume from the article that it was of course on Shoshone. The forest service closes it for commercial companies after 6000cfs due to the risk of flipping and obviously drownings. I have not run my raft throught at this level but have kayaked it at many levels and it can far exceed what most people consider class III as it is listed.

There was some footage last year at similar levels with a dory that broke and oar and flipped in the next wave that might give you some insight.
 

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shoshone at these levels is still class III. it is big, it is intimidating, but there are no obstacles to maneuver, little if any technical nature to it. keep it pointed down river and everything should be just fine.

i see few people running it at these levels. BUT, i have seen very unprepared people. no wetsuits, pounding beers before getting on the water, out of shape large people, etc...

a swim their will not be fun, but everything flushes
 

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I respectfully disagree, Shosho at 6k cfs is definitely NOT class III and you can definitely be eaten by a fair number of holes if you just point it down river.
 

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Misspellingintothefuture!
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I've stood a 14' paddle boat on end @ 9'000 c.cf.s., think the waves were about the size of the boat. Very fast, with potential for long swim. Still some big holes at that level.
My condolences to the victims loved ones.
 

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Boy Howdy!
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I respectfully disagree, Shosho at 6k cfs is definitely NOT class III and you can definitely be eaten by a fair number of holes if you just point it down river.
Shoshone is way different @ 6000 than at 11000, it is one big long rapid , I have had more trouble at the 5 - 6000 range than at 12000. But at every level you need to be on your toes and be dressed to swim
 

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Condolences for sure. I would hope it wasn't somewhere after Grizzly Creek. I can't think of any major obstacles on that section at least until after Confluence Park where the play waves may factor in.
 

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I seem to remember a huge haystack wave that develops at these flows not far downstream from Grizzly that has potential to wreak havoc on the unsuspecting boater. There have also been incidents involving the cantilevered bike path along Shoshone that gets submerged at high flows. One should suspect anything with these high flows, watch yourself out there.
 

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Plunk your magic twanger!
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Very sad. The details released are unclear but it sounds like the victim was flipped out of the raft and pulled back in quickly by the two who remained in and CPR was initiated immediately. Rescue personnel were notified quickly by a witness and were onsite within minutes of the raft arriving at the Grizzly Creek ramp after running the Shoshone section. Not sure where on Shoshone the victim went in but, as others have mentioned, it is one long rapid at 11,000 cfs.


Below Grizzly, a large wave forms at the first sharp left bend that can cause problems. Be careful out there and dress for the cold water.
 

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Shoshone is way different @ 6000 than at 11000, it is one big long rapid , I have had more trouble at the 5 - 6000 range than at 12000. But at every level you need to be on your toes and be dressed to swim

agreed shoshone at 4500 to 7000 is better water.

but that is not the level the discussion was about.
 

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in the posted video, the flow was 7500 or so. i put on minutes before those guys did. i thought to myself while watching them, that those were people that should not be on the river at this level.
most of them looked grossly out of shape, there were no wetsuits, there were beers being consumed on the ramp. they just struck me as unaware of what they were about to find, and that they were not prepared for it. adding it all up, it looked like a disaster waiting to happen.
 

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shoshone at these levels is still class III. it is big, it is intimidating, but there are no obstacles to maneuver, little if any technical nature to it. keep it pointed down river and everything should be just fine.
I disagree. There are some huge holes, a nasty undercut created by the bikepath at Tombstone, many very big crashing laterals, and extremely pushy water. As the whitewater grading scale factors danger and consequences, I think it deserves class IV rating.
 

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I wouldnt turn this into a ratings debate. If it makes you happy to call it IV, go with it. All of this discussion is moot because people like those in the video will never read the ratings or know what they mean or possibly care.
 

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I was with a group of fairly experienced paddlers and ran this at 14k three years ago. I was supposed to be in the boat with the paddlers. I chose to just get on the 14 foot cat.
I was scared shitless. Man eater was enormous as was the hole after the wall.
Wrap rock was also a nightmare.
To say this is easy class III at this level is crazy.
 
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