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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Buzzards!

I'm close to pulling the trigger on my first raft (PVC) and am trying to figure out the best way to store it between trips in the summer as well as longer term winter storage. I'm most concerned about the UV damage and unfortunately I won't have dedicated space in a garage to keep it out of the elements.

I ran across this HF car port: 10 x 17 Portable Garage
Does anyone have an experience using something like this to store a trailered raft under? It has mixed reviews and I imagine it won't last years and years but you can't beat that price.

Thoughts or other suggestions?
 

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Yeah, worth it to keep your boat out of the sun, especially if you have it on a trailer.

I'd roll the boat (and the portable carport tarp) during the winter months; ice and snow will tear them both up. You'll get more years out of the carport that way, and is there any likelihood you'll need the boat on the spur of the moment in January?
 

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Just make sure to anchor that thing down, I've seen more than a few land on neighboring properties, and often well beyond the next door neighbor.
 

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I just put an oversize tarp over my boat for the winter. It extends down to cover the full boat all he way around. Seems to have worked pretty well for the last 16 years....
 

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I have a PVC raft, and I do think lots of sun is not good for that stuff. I roll mine, personally, but I have thought about getting a trailer and a decent fitting cover for it. That seems like the more versatile option than a car port to me. But, for now, mine's just in a big bag.
 

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Yes, always keep your boat out of the sun as much as possible and you will have a boat that will last forever; unless abused otherwise such as in transport.

To repeat, cover your boat when it is not being used and by all means, use 303. I won't say how much 303 but use often enough to keep your boat looking proper.

Like Andy, I put a (two) tarps over both of my trailer-ed boats. There is at least a 1/2 overlap on the tarps that I buy from Costco that for the high quality are much cheaper than Harbor Freight. As with most things you buy from Costco, you have one choice(size) but it comes as a two pack that works out perfect for each boat. The tarps shelter over boats and the trailer(trailers deserve proper care also.)

I've wondered about the Harbor Freight style prop-up but my neighborhood here up again the mountains between Golden and Boulder and beyond; we have down slope winds that would launch these sheds like a kite or tatter it mercilessly.

So anchoring is critical. If using these shelter on dirt to anchor properly use doggy screws or aircraft dirt strip anchors. These are similar in design and purpose. They screw into the ground and more anchors are better, especially if you are anchoring a bush plane. On concrete, I suggest drilling and setting anchor bolts.

With that, I will stay say good luck, especially it your live near me or in zones with frequent katabatic winds where one season is likely to be as much as you can expect.
 

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Sun is bad on both PVC and hypalon. People will say worse on PVC. While likely more bad on PVC I frequently see puke orange hypalon boats that used to be orange. Likewise blue or green or otherwise. PVC "brittles" faster than hypalon under UV damage but why degrade either material by exposure when not in use. Protect your investment and pride and joy, cover it and use 303 I say.
 

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As others have said, I'd roll and store inside for winter. Whitewater Designs in Eugene makes a real nice boat cover. It comes with enough strapping that you could probably even trailer with it on. That's what I used in the unfortunate years when I didn't have a garage and had to park my trailer in my back yard.
 

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Interestingly enough the wind in western CO yesterday took my shed for a ride.

The shed is heavy - it’s 16’ wide by 20’ deep, I’d guess it’s over 1000lbs.

it was bolted to 10” deep concrete pylons sink into the ground. It didn’t shear the bolts, it picked it up out of the ground and flipped it into the neighbors yard.

I was just in it two minutes before the wind shear came through.

it’s well built and other than one ripped In half panel the only damage is some dents in the other panels.
 

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I went to a roofing place and bought stuff they put on flat roofs for stores. It can be "welded" it to any size. I've had some of it covering stuff out in the sun for 20 years and it is still about the same as when I bought it. For my raft the piece is about 15 by 20 and cost less than $100 (was scrap from a job). I've also used the rubber flat roofing material - going on 20 years no signs of wear- cheap left over from a job as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yes, always keep your boat out of the sun as much as possible and you will have a boat that will last forever; unless abused otherwise such as in transport.

To repeat, cover your boat when it is not being used and by all means, use 303. I won't say how much 303 but use often enough to keep your boat looking proper.

Like Andy, I put a (two) tarps over both of my trailer-ed boats. There is at least a 1/2 overlap on the tarps that I buy from Costco that for the high quality are much cheaper than Harbor Freight. As with most things you buy from Costco, you have one choice(size) but it comes as a two pack that works out perfect for each boat. The tarps shelter over boats and the trailer(trailers deserve proper care also.)

I've wondered about the Harbor Freight style prop-up but my neighborhood here up again the mountains between Golden and Boulder and beyond; we have down slope winds that would launch these sheds like a kite or tatter it mercilessly.

So anchoring is critical. If using these shelter on dirt to anchor properly use doggy screws or aircraft dirt strip anchors. These are similar in design and purpose. They screw into the ground and more anchors are better, especially if you are anchoring a bush plane. On concrete, I suggest drilling and setting anchor bolts.

With that, I will stay say good luck, especially it your live near me or in zones with frequent katabatic winds where one season is likely to be as much as you can expect.
Yes I’m down the road from you in Fort Collins and I’m familiar with the wind you’re referring to. That’s my biggest concern with the whole tent style car port thing
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Appreciate all the feedback. I was thinking of rolling in the winter which sounds like the way to go. Also seems like a boat cover might be a more wind friendly alternative for the summer months
 

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I went to a roofing place and bought stuff they put on flat roofs for stores. It can be "welded" it to any size. I've had some of it covering stuff out in the sun for 20 years and it is still about the same as when I bought it. For my raft the piece is about 15 by 20 and cost less than $100 (was scrap from a job). I've also used the rubber flat roofing material - going on 20 years no signs of wear- cheap left over from a job as well.
Brilliant. That would work great over a Harbor Freight/Costco garage frame!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I went to a roofing place and bought stuff they put on flat roofs for stores. It can be "welded" it to any size. I've had some of it covering stuff out in the sun for 20 years and it is still about the same as when I bought it. For my raft the piece is about 15 by 20 and cost less than $100 (was scrap from a job). I've also used the rubber flat roofing material - going on 20 years no signs of wear- cheap left over from a job as well.
Do you have a picture of this setup?
 
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