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Discussion Starter #1
Oops put this in the wrong forum first time around. We have a 14' self bailing raft we need some recommendations on a good expedtion style rowing frame, has anyone had any experience with the salmon river expedition made by cascade outfitters. We are obviously looking for quality and a good price. Thanks
 

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Doing a "raft frame" search would be a good start.
 

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I've never cared for raft frames with sides like that - you don't need to support the tubes like on a cat. My own bias is a flat frame with decks over the tubes and then sling a solid floor on which to pile gear - basically a slightly modified DRE rig (Down River Equipment)

Lots of options though, depending on what you want to do with it. Do you want a break down? How much will you carry? How do you rig?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Basically it's going to be a gear hauler so at least a cooler and a drybox, I don't care much for the plywood floors our friends had one for their cat and it was heavy as sin. That was my concern as well with the cascade outfitters frame referenced above since it is steel not aluminum but it can carry two dryboxes and a cooler.
 

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Can't go wrong with a DRE frame.

I am not sure what the advantage is of a solid floor. I use a canvas platform and it works fine. It keeps the heavy stuff off of the floor, but doesn't allow for any sharp object you might go over to push up against something solid that could rip the floor (more give). You can try to convince me otherwise. Plus they are usually heavy and bulky. I put my canvas platform in with my strap bag.
 

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I am not sure what the advantage is of a solid floor.
No doubt a frame with a solid floor such as plywood or diamond plate is heavier and is harder to break down. On a big gear boat, the additional weight of a floor is minor compared to the load you are carrying. Most people don't think twice about a person riding in their boat or carrying 10 gallons of water, yet that heavy diamond plate is about 2 lbs/sqft.

I think solid floors offer two advantages in a gear hauling raft. It is easy to load a solid floor raft with all sorts of odd shaped and hard gear directly on the solid floor in lots of configurtions then strap over the top. During 20+ years of rafting, my gear has always changed, but my frame didn't need to. Also a solid floor is great for standing while rowing.
 

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[ We are obviously looking for quality and a good price. Thanks[/quote]

I'm new to this area as well, but I found rowframe.com...worth checking out.
 

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I don't think those canvas things protect the floor enough, they won't stay flat. Plus, you can't tie gear down to them, groover, rocket boxes, vittle vaults, etc, etc get tied down to my beaver board, more crap on top, ending with the mesh thing over it all to hold it down (if upside down). I also use a cockpit floor for multidays since I can have a rocket box on each side of me and hold them bomber. I do make sure to strap over them (to the frame cross bars), for the "rig to flip" philosophy.
 

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I need to get pictures one of these days... This is all in a Maravia Williwaw 1.5.
My frame: DRE double rail with diamond plate, 2 bays rigged as 4 - the front bay has a 19" dry box hanging on tabs and strapped down. The main bay has a diamond plate floor slung with straps. On it sits the cooler, two captains boxes (or rocket boxes, water jugs, ammo cans, etc) in the cockpit, and then I sit on a row of 5 rocket boxes kept in place by a table. I have both a soft & hard beaver tail and cargo net if needed, but usually just pile dry bags on the floor and strap them to the frame.

Advantages of the hard floor - it's stable to stand on, I can load metal boxes without having to be careful, it's easy to rig the whole mess to flip and then de-rig quickly at camp, everything can come out as needed without disrupting any other piece. Since they're both flat, the floor travels on the bottom of the trailer under all the gear, the frame sits across the top.
Disadvantages - it's a pretty heavy rig for short trips, which is why we have a 14' cat as well.
 

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I have a salmon frame, bought thru the river connection. I believe it's actually made by Cy at cambridge welding. Has 3 gear bays one of which is a dedicated cooler bay with slings, the other two could be for either dry boxes or coolers. My only complaint is that the bays are fixed, ie. you can not change the width for different size boxes/coolers. That being said, if you think about what you want/need out of a frame size wise beforehand and have them build it to spec (which they do) they are nice cause you don't have to think too much about what goes where. Dry box here, cooler there, etc. Of course if you ever get a different size raft the fixed frame size may not fit. ???? Personally very happy with the frame and was able to find a replacement raft with the same dimensions over the winter. I'll be pumpin her up tomorrow for the first time this year for a float, so I may have some pics to post.

as someone else has mentioned there are lots of thoughts on frames and related items here, many great ideas which will probaly cause months/years of thought and re-thought on the subject.

syotr!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No need to worry thanks for the suggestions recretec is alive and well and we went down to Portland yesterday and got a custom frame from them. They also make some really nice dry boxes and other stuff all custom done. Timmy there was very helpful and even found a pretty cheap way to get it closer to us so we don't have to drive back down and pick it up. See you on the river.
 
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