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Definite maybe
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This is not another open locks vs pins and clips debate. I have noticed throughout the years that some people pull the oar toward the pin and others push toward the pin. Just wondering what you do and why. If I was better with this interweb thing I'd post pictures of the 2 ways I keep seeing.
 

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If you are talking about which side of the pin the oar sits on, I always had mine on the other side of the oar tower from me. Its sort of hard to explain, but since there is some rotation of the oar shaft due to slop in the pin, it always felt like I could get more solid strokes when it was set up that way since the blade of the oar had a slight angle to it. Having the oar on the far side of the pin made the powerful pull strokes more solid and the push strokes that are more finesse feel right. I definitely could have rotated where the clip was on the oar to make it a perfect 90 degrees when it was on the clip, but never got around to it before switching to Oar Locks.

The oars also felt too close if they were on the close side, and since I inherited this setup from another dude and it was welded solid to the frame it felt like it was the right way to go having it on the further side from me. This also has the benefit of having the oars on the outside of the oar towers when you ship the oars which makes it marginally easier to move around the boat. I also have a bimini that was mounted to the top of my oar towers, and it works MUCH better to have the oars on the outside when that thing is collapsed.

I'm sure you could make it work either way though.
 

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I'm not sure it matters much, but if you choose to put the oar on the far side of the pin (from the rowers perspective) it might reduce the distance required to fully ship the oars by a few inches.
 

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The oar should be pin on the pin not the clip. Al though after popping an oar in a rapid I have stuck them on backwards just to have something to row with.
 

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Definite maybe
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Discussion Starter #6
I'm not sure it matters much, but if you choose to put the oar on the far side of the pin (from the rowers perspective) it might reduce the distance required to fully ship the oars by a few inches.
That is my opinion too.

Now when I row my backstroke is much more powerful than my front stroke but I paddle forward way more than back. With that in mind wouldn't pushing on the pins make more sense? I don't know I guess that's why I'm asking.
 

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That is my opinion too.

Now when I row my backstroke is much more powerful than my front stroke but I paddle forward way more than back. With that in mind wouldn't pushing on the pins make more sense? I don't know I guess that's why I'm asking.
pushing on the oars offers very little power. Always use the backstroke to run a rapid, I do push on the oars to pick up speed on entry but pivot and pull for everything else.
 

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Definite maybe
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Discussion Starter #8
I push alot in rapids because I'm taking advantage of a pair of paddlers assisting. With no paddle assist I pull more. The question I'm asking is what do you do and why?
 

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Misspellingintothefuture!
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Does seem like the stronger pull stroke should lever off the oar shaft and the weaker push stroke should lever off the clip.
That's correct, since an oars mans stronger stroke is pulling, having the oar shaft forward of the pin is stronger. Could you bend your pins setting em up the other way? I don't know, but this is how I learned, and since it makes sense to me, it's how I set mine up at least.
 

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That's correct, since an oars mans stronger stroke is pulling, having the oar shaft forward of the pin is stronger. Could you bend your pins setting em up the other way? I don't know, but this is how I learned, and since it makes sense to me, it's how I set mine up at least.
Or rather bend the clip, right? They seem stout, but they are designed for a little flex to get them locked on the pin, right? So it seems like if you set the shaft on the stern side and the clip on the bow side of the pin, and laid into them with a mighty big manly pull stroke, you could get some flex in the clip. But really, probably barely, since the pin sits up in the crook of the pin where there wouldn't be much flex. Intuitively, though, oar in front seems right, and I say that based on no meaningful experience with them whatsoever. Fun guessing, though.
 

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Ya, the dislexia got to me, meant clip.
If you had an issue going on with your clip atachment, that could also be a place for failure, and another reason to pull against the pin, and not the clip.
Oars out front always seemed right to me as well, just feels backwards to do it the other way.
 

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Ya, the dislexia got to me, meant clip.
If you had an issue going on with your clip atachment, that could also be a place for failure, and another reason to pull against the pin, and not the clip.
Oars out front always seemed right to me as well, just feels backwards to do it the other way.
Right, when you push with shaft afore the pin, you're actually levering on the hose clamps or whatever else holds the clip to the oarshaft. That makes sense compared to pulling on the same attachments. (I used some nautical shit there...pretty cool, eh?)
 

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I see it like this... If you are an averaged size fella, set it so that the oar is on the far side from you. Then, when your average size lady rows, you can swap em so that the oar is closer to her. See what I mean?
 

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I agree with a number of posts here. I am at least twice as strong on the pull stroke as opposed to the push stroke so always put the oar on the far side of the pin so I am not flexing the clip and not pulling on the clamps holding the clips on the oar on the pull stroke. Another advantage to that position is Safety. When I snag that downstream oar and it tries to take my teeth out or crack my ribs, as soon as the clip clears the pin I can redirect the oar foreward and up away from my body. This is also why I would never recommend using stirrups with Pins and Clips. Please remove the stirrups, it may take a little more time to reclip a popped oar but I have seen more than a few injuries due to that downsteam oar. I prefer the Pins and Clips system without stirrups over any other for that reason.
 

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I always put the oars on the bow side. I like pins and clips, but I've always side-eyed those hose clamps that hold the clip to the oar. I figure if anything ever failed in that set up, it would be those clamps. So, that said, if there is ever a stroke I'm putting my all into to avoid a hairy situation, it will be on my pull stroke. Set up with oar on the bow side, that takes the weak link out of the equation when I really need to make sure the setup is working. It should be said as well that I've never had a hose clamp break - just my paranoia I guess...
 

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I wrap my hose clamps with duct tape as a back up, and also to prevent the clamp from cutting my boat. Never had catastrophic failure, either
 

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This is not another open locks vs pins and clips debate. I have noticed throughout the years that some people pull the oar toward the pin and others push toward the pin. Just wondering what you do and why. If I was better with this interweb thing I'd post pictures of the 2 ways I keep seeing.
Trying to visualize this. Anyway you can post a picture of your setup?
 

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The shop set mine up with the oars in front of the pins (far side from me). Always made sense to me to have the weak link (the clip) handling the load from my far weaker stroke (the push). Haven't seen any reason to change them in the intervening decade +.

And Michael P, I see your point, but I'll keep my stirrups. I'm mindful of the downstream oar, and have yet to have an issue with that. But there have been several occasions when I popped a clip off the pin at exactly the wrong moment but was, thanks to the stirrups, able to keep rowing, reasonably efficiently, on either the push or the pull. For me personally, that insurance is worth some increased risk of injury from an errant oar. YMMV, of course.
 

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pushing on the oars offers very little power. Always use the backstroke to run a rapid, I do push on the oars to pick up speed on entry but pivot and pull for everything else.
This is perhaps a bit off-topic from the OP's question but to respond to the quote above...

Caveat: I am by no means an expert boatman. No need to describe my boating resume as appealing to authority is a logical fallacy. But here are my two cents -

IMO inexperienced boatmen overly rely on the backstroke. Especially above horizon lines on pool/drop rivers. And because they aren't particularly adept at reading water they pull their boat back and forth across eddylines and boils and away from and sometimes towards real or perceived hazards, often because they haven't picked a line and committed to it. Hell, I was there once. I could be there next trip if I don't bring my A-game.

Unless you are running with your stern downstream (which I've done plenty, both intentionally and unintentionally) you have more control and get more momentum by setting up early and pushing into your line. Particularly if you have a well-balanced boat and aren't stern-heavy.

The best oarsmen I have seen keep their bow downstream (when appropriate) and set up well in advance, making last-minute corrections with double-oar turns and making micro-adjustments. They square-up to waves and pivot/spin to win against downstream obstacles as needed.

And you'll notice that the most experienced oarsmen make it look effortless and push/pull much less than their less-experienced brethren (like me). Because they set up early and make make strategic and well-timed strokes.

As I said YMMV. But that's what I've observed.
 
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