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Exactly my logic and reasoning. Now I have adapters for all my 18-volt tools to run the 20-volt batteries... I thought more than once about scrapping them and just going to Milwaukee... I hate the lithium-ion batteries with a passion
 

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Anyone have any experience with the DeWalt Max Inflator? Wondering how long it would take to fill a 16' self-bailer. I like the idea that if a tire is low at the take out, that it could fill that too...
That's what I have. It takes about 15 minutes to air up my 16' self-bailer compared to less than 5 minutes with a blower. The high flow setting is fairly low pressure compared to other options too, so you will still need to top off with another pump. It also doesn't have enough pressure to push air past a closed Leafield valve so you will need an adapter that opens the valve while filling. However, if you find/build the right adapter, you can set in in your valve and walk away to do other rigging stuff so you're not really losing time anyway. Saving 10 minutes at the put in isn't enough of a reason for me to buy another tool.
 

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Anyone have any experience with the DeWalt Max Inflator? Wondering how long it would take to fill a 16' self-bailer. I like the idea that if a tire is low at the take out, that it could fill that too...
they work really good for airing up tires, I like the fact that you can set the pressure and once it achieves that pressure it shuts off. Doesn't seem to have a whole lot of air flow through the low pressure side though
 

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NRS Blast with a motorcycle battery in an ammo can also does a good job...
Keep in mind that except for AC blowers (shop vacs, Big Red, Man o Rubber, etc) you probably will have to inflate with your valves locked open... i haven't found an 18v or 20v pump that could push through the closed valves.
 

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NRS Blast with a motorcycle battery in an ammo can also does a good job...
Keep in mind that except for AC blowers (shop vacs, Big Red, Man o Rubber, etc) you probably will have to inflate with your valves locked open... i haven't found an 18v or 20v pump that could push through the closed valves.
My 18V Makita leaf blower inflates the raft without the valve being locked open. I then top off with a manual pump. No issues so far.
 

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Thanks for all the replies. I had one of the old NRS Blasts - worked great until it burned out - but the new ones don't deflate, so thought maybe that DeWalt inflator would have enough power to fill my tubes. Sounds like it might be a stretch for it / take a long time to fill....I don't care about opening the valves and even with the old Blast I always topped off with the hand pump anyway. Really just want something to inflate / deflate efficiently, either cordless or clipped to my car battery.
 

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Just bought my first raft (16’ RMR) and slowly piecing the whole thing together. I’m currently looking at pumps - obviously the Carlson hand pump is a classic and what I use to top off when guiding commercial trips...
BUT does anyone have a recommendation for an electric pump that can be used for both rafts & SUPs? Thanks!
Ive used the NRS Blast inflator (we call it “The Screamer”, yes it is loud) for many years. Clips to your battery posts. Also use it for our inflatable SUP. The pump I bought also allowed for deflation, which is awesome for the sup, sucks it bone dry before rolling it up. I bought a small marine battery for one of my Grand trips to power up cameras, and I use that sometimes to connect the pump to so I don’t have to have a car battery nearby.
 

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My 18V Makita leaf blower inflates the raft without the valve being locked open. I then top off with a manual pump. No issues so far.
If you lock the valve open or use that adapter, there's less back pressure on the blower; the easier for a fan to blow air in, less heat, less friction, etc.
It's a blower, not a compressor...with fewer restrictions or back pressure you should have more battery life per charge/inflation and longer tool lifespan.
 

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Just as an FYI for folks looking for adapters for leafblowers/inflators: If you don't want to buy one of the fancy pre-made ones, I stumbled across a cheap and easy way to make one that fits great and will even push the valve stem in for you.

It turns out the diameter of a standard 20 mL syringe body is perfect to wedge in the Leafield C7 valve. Even better, the syringe barrel nests perfectly inside a piece of 3/4" PVC (sched. 40). (A small amount of sanding the interior of the PVC pipe may be necessary.) For me, that 3/4 PVC turns out to fit perfectly in the shop vac hose from my bucket head vac. But, depending on your blower fittings, I'll bet you can figure out how to adapt it to 3/4 PVC.

BUT.... here's the nice thing. If you can get your hands on a 20 mL syringe, the stem of the plunger is perfect for pushing down the valve stem so you don't have to pump with the valve open and rush to close it when you pull out at the end.

Here's how to make the adapter: Take a 20 mL syringe and cut off both ends of the barrel so you have just a plastic tube. Verify this will wedge nicely in your valve. Then, take the plunger and cut off both the end with the rubber seal and the end you push on with your thumb. Cut this the same length or a bit shorter than the barrel you made. Slide it into the barrel (should slide in easily, but the X shape will keep it centered) and position it so one end of the plunger is flush with one end of the barrel. Fix that in place with a screw coming through the side of the syringe barrel and the center of the plunger. It should be placed high enough on the barrel that it will stay outside the valve. 1-1.5" from the end of the tube is pretty good. I drilled a small pilot hole through one side of the barrel and the center of the plunger, as the plunger material seems to crack easily.

When you insert the adapter into your valve, the barrel will wedge/seal nicely and the plunger will push in on your valve stem. Presto! Even low powered inflators that can't push hard enough to work with a closed valve will inflate just fine without losing any air when you detach them.

If it sounds complicated to make, it's not. It probably took me longer to type that than it did to make it. If you're not a science/heathcare worker with access to 20mL syringes, ask a friend who is. They're a dime a dozen and I'm sure you can get one for free.
 

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Just as an FYI for folks looking for adapters for leafblowers/inflators: If you don't want to buy one of the fancy pre-made ones, I stumbled across a cheap and easy way to make one that fits great and will even push the valve stem in for you.

It turns out the diameter of a standard 20 mL syringe body is perfect to wedge in the Leafield C7 valve. Even better, the syringe barrel nests perfectly inside a piece of 3/4" PVC (sched. 40). (A small amount of sanding the interior of the PVC pipe may be necessary.) For me, that 3/4 PVC turns out to fit perfectly in the shop vac hose from my bucket head vac. But, depending on your blower fittings, I'll bet you can figure out how to adapt it to 3/4 PVC.

BUT.... here's the nice thing. If you can get your hands on a 20 mL syringe, the stem of the plunger is perfect for pushing down the valve stem so you don't have to pump with the valve open and rush to close it when you pull out at the end.

Here's how to make the adapter: Take a 20 mL syringe and cut off both ends of the barrel so you have just a plastic tube. Verify this will wedge nicely in your valve. Then, take the plunger and cut off both the end with the rubber seal and the end you push on with your thumb. Cut this the same length or a bit shorter than the barrel you made. Slide it into the barrel (should slide in easily, but the X shape will keep it centered) and position it so one end of the plunger is flush with one end of the barrel. Fix that in place with a screw coming through the side of the syringe barrel and the center of the plunger. It should be placed high enough on the barrel that it will stay outside the valve. 1-1.5" from the end of the tube is pretty good. I drilled a small pilot hole through one side of the barrel and the center of the plunger, as the plunger material seems to crack easily.

When you insert the adapter into your valve, the barrel will wedge/seal nicely and the plunger will push in on your valve stem. Presto! Even low powered inflators that can't push hard enough to work with a closed valve will inflate just fine without losing any air when you detach them.

If it sounds complicated to make, it's not. It probably took me longer to type that than it did to make it. If you're not a science/heathcare worker with access to 20mL syringes, ask a friend who is. They're a dime a dozen and I'm sure you can get one for free.
That's awesome low-budget innovative tech right there!!!
 
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