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X2 on the Power Stove option. Works great as a blaster for heating dishwater pronto on jet blast, then insert the flame diverter to turn it into a passable camp fire facsimile. I use cinder rocks out of my home gas fire pit, but ceramic fire place logs would do it too. I have also used it on the damped down setting for a Dutch oven, just have to move the DO around every few minutes to not scorch one spot too much. The whole thing folds up pretty much flat when done.
 

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I have the Camp Chef Portable Fire Ring, about $70 at Amazon. It comes with a grill to use for cooking, and is basically a small propane/lava rock grill, with a little more flame. Burns about 1 lb. per hour when cranked up. Works good for a little ambiance and warmth during the shoulder seasons, and I'm happy with mine. Only thing that would make it better would be a tight lid for strapping on its side in a crate or drop bag, though it does come with a fabric cover/sack. Also, the gas valve and hose attachment point protrudes from the side...would be nice if that fitting was recessed. I might try a quick release fitting there with a short extension.
 

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Check them out here

Accessories | The Power Stove

$68 retail for the logs
Woodland Power Stove Accessories are a cruel joke. I had no problem buying the stove and I still see them for sale on dealers shelves. I tried to purchase the ceramic logs numerous times with no result; even the local dealer threw his hands up after a couple days trying. Woodland Power Stove folks do not return calls or reply to email or letter in my experience. Too bad as the stove is a valued piece of equipment.
 

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How much propane does it take to feed a 65,000 btu burner? I'm guessing that an hour around the 'camp fire' is going suck a lot more gas than bacon an eggs on a 15,000 btu camp stove.

Some on-line research provided this rule of thumb for propane usage.. "The quick & dirty formula we use in the industry is 100,000btu's burns a gallon an hour"

So if a 65,000 btu burner uses .65 gal/hour at full throttle
a 20 lb bottle (4.73 gal) will last about 7 1/2 hours total burn time.

Can anyone with experience provide input, how long can you run a big burner on a 20 lb can?
 

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I know that my Power Stove sucked the fuel down quick. I use a 11lbs pancake bottle and it used more than half in two days of boiling water for dishes and one night of heating dinner when we ran out of the small green grenade propane. But it sure is nice to boil water FAST. I love it.
 

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We have just carried pressed logs when wood is an issue. Considered prooane fire on the grand and the group decided on logs instead. We were very happy with the choice.

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We have just carried pressed logs when wood is an issue. Considered prooane fire on the grand and the group decided on logs instead. We were very happy with the choice.

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I like the pressed logs too for a sure-fire fire, when you can legally burn one. We only use the power stove option when actual fires aren't permitted, which is most of the summer on rivers in Oregon. I've heard that "artificial" fires aren't really permitted then either, but propane stoves are always allowed, and hey, it's a stove right? I'm just slow roasting some cinder rocks on low heat, officer...

Thinksnow, we burned through most of a 10 pound tank of propane boiling dish water and using the "fire feature" for several hours each night (and some in the morning) on a recent 3 night trip. You really only crank through the BTUs when on full blaster mode. You use a restrictor plate and turn it way down to get the look of a camp fire.
 

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Still have not seen a propane "fire" anywhere near the real deal, and what I have seen will go through a 5 gal bottle mighty fast. We have found that filling our shit boxes with dimensional lumber has worker very well. Options options, yours, tom
 

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I like the pressed logs too for a sure-fire fire, when you can legally burn one. We only use the power stove option when actual fires aren't permitted, which is most of the summer on rivers in Oregon. I've heard that "artificial" fires aren't really permitted then either, but propane stoves are always allowed, and hey, it's a stove right? I'm just slow roasting some cinder rocks on low heat, officer...
Oh yes, and I have brought candles to use in place of a fire for ambiance.
 

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Can't speak for most rivers but I know when I worked for the Fishlake NF we spent considerable time debating the topic and landed on allowing them during fire bans ( back in 2007-2008 ). They are definitely questionable on the open flame issue but don't send out embers and spark the same way. Many fires also start from careless handling of fire when people go to bed or leave their site and the propane fires have the benefit of being totally LNT and completely off/out.

I would guess many rivers will head this way within the next 10-15 years as wildfires become increasingly common and the reality of limited woody debris (some rivers are noticeable exceptions) is addressed. I wouldn't be shocked if most rivers eventually only allow wood fires from mid-October until the end of April.

Phillip
 

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We have found that filling our shit boxes with dimensional lumber has worker very well.
Tom,

That's a great idea for packing in firewood - I was on a trip once with a carpenter that brought along a bunch of hardwood scraps packed in cardboard boxes and was amazed how compact it was.

-AH
 

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Can't speak for most rivers but I know when I worked for the Fishlake NF we spent considerable time debating the topic and landed on allowing them during fire bans ( back in 2007-2008 ). They are definitely questionable on the open flame issue but don't send out embers and spark the same way. Many fires also start from careless handling of fire when people go to bed or leave their site and the propane fires have the benefit of being totally LNT and completely off/out.

I would guess many rivers will head this way within the next 10-15 years as wildfires become increasingly common and the reality of limited woody debris (some rivers are noticeable exceptions) is addressed. I wouldn't be shocked if most rivers eventually only allow wood fires from mid-October until the end of April.

Phillip
I'm beginning to see the evolution of these contraptions as well as their utility as much as I hate to see them replace the smell, heat output, crackling sound of the fire pan. As mentioned the fire danger doesn't seem to be letting up any time soon and now we are being ravaged by the pine beetles which will also limit who can bring whatever type of wood from where ever. The desert rivers also have the issues as mentioned with being picked over. After the Tamarisk has been exhausted as a fuel source then we will find ourselves back to propane fires in a can. I like the candles for ambiance idea but no fire in a pan? Just got chills.
 

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Propane fires use a ton of gas. We did a March run down the Grand and brought our own fire wood. Each boat carried an old dry bag full of red wood. We had a fire every night and morning of our trip with wood left over at the end. 16 days and 8 rafts.
 

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A 20# propane bottle will produce 428,000 BTU's and a Woodland burns between 5,000 BTU's on low and 65,000 BTU's on high. That would be about 80 hours to 61/2 hours per tank depending on how high the flame. I may have to waste a tank to see what an reasonable size flame would burn (BTU's) per hour. It is a good of an excuse as any to go to the woods and sit around a camp fire with my best friend Jack.
 

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EZ Campfire

I believe the portable campfire you referred to in your original post was the "EZ Campfire" - I got mine from GCPBA in 2008. It's been great. Absolutely bullet proof. Three trips down the GC and countless others in the lower 48 and Alaska. They don't make them anymore - but today's stuff is probably better. I have a friend who has the Camp Chef Portable Fire Ring. Works great and durable. Comes with all the stuff - on sale at Amazon.

Good for use under rain shades - no sparks. Good for cold mornings on winter/shoulder season trips - no waiting for ash to cool or having to haul wet ash. Lava rocks come with the camp chef - they're worth it. They disperse flame and radiate heat. Good luck.
 
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