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Was thinking of trying this out, and was wondering if anyone has any experience with it?

Seems like you'd have to have a side pile of extra coals going to keep cycling on new heat?
 

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No reason it couldn't be done, gonna need a big ass oven. Its going to be really hard to get it nice and rare. Do you have quite a bit of experience with cooking large cuts of meat in a DO? If not start with something less expensive and build up to it. But heck, for all I know your are a DO master chef.
 

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I did a full 7lb sirloin in a DO once on a Deso trip, dried it really well, coated with sugar, put directly on the fire to caramelize the sugar and create a good sear / crust, then into the DO, 6 coals on the bottom, 4 on the top, about 40 minutes later checked with a meat thermometer, was perfectly rare / medium rare depending on where you cut. And yes, if memory serves we replaced the coals when they burned down with coals from the fire.

I don't see any reason you couldn't do this with a small prime rib. The sear is key in my opinion, and instead of regular white sugar, I'd use Brown sugar, rosemary, a little sage, smoked paprika, white pepper and a little cumin on a prime, but that's just me :)
 

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I do brisket quite a bit on river floats.

I put a spacer lid (home made) in my DO to keep the meat off the bottom maybe one forth inch.

Do a rub on the brisket, pour a can of adobo chilies on top then cola or dr pepper a can or so, then put it on the coals. Will take at least for me 4 or 5 hours. Plan on new charcoals as needed. After a while I take a look and continue cooking till the brisket basically will fall apart. Last one I did in a 14 anodized DO was with the camp chef cover on my partner steel stove. Takes a bit of testing to get the heat and setup working right but for me much easier than using charcoal.

I have served the brisket sliced or pulled apart in chunks (a big fry pan of green beans, onions, pecan or almonds etc with DO baked spuds is awesome) or pulled pork style on toasted hamburger buns with potato salad, chips or the oven french fries in another DO etc is also very good.

I used to do brisket in my smoker (best smoke flavor for sure) but the DO on a stove method works great on river trips but will take a lay over day to make unless you precook at home in the oven..
 

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Thanks Okieboater, I hadn't thought of that. I generally smoke them, slice it and vacu-seal, then toss in the DO to reheat, hadn't thought of actually cooking it on a layover day, good call !!


As far as Sous Vide, getting a little culinarialy fancy with the food, huh MT4 ?
 

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unfortunately for me, Sous Vide is above my river cooking skill set.

I have read about Sous Vide and it sounds like a good deal. But, as mentioned,
Sous Vide is something I need to leave to those with more cook skills than I have.

On the other hand, this thread is one that I have a lot of interest in following.

Buzzards have a lot of river skills to share and this will be a tasty addition to my recipe file.
 

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I was on a trip that tried this.

The rib was packed in kosher salt inside the Dutch oven.

Unfortunately, the thermometer system malfunctioned and the roast turned out medium well. Still tasty, just not the same.

I would try it again, but with a better thermometer.
 

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Here is a fun meal that is a little easier than Prime rib to cook and get right. Can be done at home, sealed and frozen in boiling bags for a quick dinner on the river.

Scott's DO oven ribs
Ingredients
⦁ 4 lbs. baby back pork ribs or beef ribs or however much will fit in your DO
⦁ 3⁄4 cup brown sugar (light or dark)
⦁ 1 teaspoon smoked salt
⦁ 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
⦁ 1 tablespoon garlic powder
⦁ 1⁄4 teaspoon ground red pepper (optional)
⦁ 2 cups of your favorite Barbecue sauce (Bulls-Eye Original is mine)
Directions
1. Preheat DO to 300 degrees f.
2. Peel off tough membrane that covers the bony side of the ribs.
3. Mix together well the sugar and spices to make the rub (at home).
4. Apply rub to ribs on all sides just before cooking.
5. Lay (two layers) ribs on a double layer of non-stick foil, shiny side out and meaty side down.
6. Lay one layer of foil on top of ribs and roll and crimp edges tightly, edges facing up to seal.
7. Place in DO and bake for 1 1/2 hours. Do not add any more charcoal after 1 1/2 hours and let stand for 45 minutes in DO.
8. Remove from foil and save foil for later.
9. Cut ribs into serving sized portions of 2 or 3 ribs.
10. Arrange bony side up.
11. Brush on sauce .
12. Repeat on other side.
13. Grill the ribs on your fire pan, bony side down. Cover with foil loosely to cook on the sauce until it bubbles and sticks on ribs.
14. Serve with extra BBQ sauce, coleslaw and baked beans.
 

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https://drive.google.com/file/d/1FK4sOmz-3VBTkYpSexeLztKU2CTNE2qy/view?usp=sharing

I cook a fantastic Rib Roast at home and I don't see why it couldn't be duplicated in a DO. First of all I must confess I am a low heat then high heat guy. My roast starts like this:

1. Trim the bones from the roast and then retie on with butchers twine. No sense loosing all that flavor but make serving a lot easier!

2. Rub liberally with Olive Oil, the entire roast.

3. Coat generously with Kosher Salt and pepper.

4. Place in pan (or DO) elevated off of the bottom.

5. Slowly roast between 180 and 220 degrees F until the internal temp reaches 125-128.

6. Remove from oven, cover and raise temp to 450 f..... This maybe the difficult part as you would physically have to remove the meat from the DO.... Or maybe it gets a good fire sear.

7. Once at 450 F place meat back in over for 15 minutes.... pull out and let stand.... make your Au Ju .....

8. Meat should land at 130-135 and be very tasty!
 

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Personally, I wouldn't use a Dutch Oven. I want the meat to be accessible so I can closely monitor the internal temperature. I use a remote digital thermometer. I place the thermo-couple into the center of the roast and plug it into the read out, thus allowing me to watch the temperature throughout the entire cooking process. That said, I see no reason you couldn't cook it on a grill or Asado cross over an open fire like the Gauchos do in Argentina. You'd just need to have a supply of good wood (not pine) and a sense of adventure. (and patience)



I am planning to build an Asado Cross as my project in my first welding class. Not sure how I would take it on the river but it will be fun to play with at home. Especially if I can convince my wife to let me do a whole lamb.
 

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Many times I've cooked pork tenderloins in a DO and made certain to have enough left over to dice up the next morning to make a big pot of SOS(sh*t on a shingle or chipped pork on toast if you weren't in the army).

It is really easy in that once the DO is cooled down put all the left overs still in the DO in a cooler if you have room. Next morning while you are dicing up the tenderloin start the gravey with water that breaks loose meat and things stuck to the bottom of the DO.

Many people have never had SOS or never had it on the river hence it gets chowed down pretty fast.
 

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unfortunately for me, Sous Vide is above my river cooking skill set.

I have read about Sous Vide and it sounds like a good deal. But, as mentioned,
Sous Vide is something I need to leave to those with more cook skills than I have.

On the other hand, this thread is one that I have a lot of interest in following.

Buzzards have a lot of river skills to share and this will be a tasty addition to my recipe file.

Thats one of the beauties of sous vide. Its hard to fuck up. Sous vide, vac seal and into the fridge then cooler. Sear on the river. Perfect.
 
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