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Ok guys, just to be clear, I am not some crazy cat man, I'm talking about rigging a hammock stand to my cat frame.
I am thinking of using these, which are the same as the umbrella mount from DRE and some tubing. I am envisioning two clamps, and about 8ft of tubing per side, at some angle around 45 degrees or so.
What do you guys think?
the Hollaender website says its axial load strength it 2000lbs or so, which is slightly less than what I weigh.
 

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I have been thinking of doing that exact thing on our raft- I think I could actually get two side by side. That's one of my winter projects.
 

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I saw a pic I think on the raft porn thread. It's a great idea (I think). And something I have been considering as well. I was thinking about lo pros that I would leave in place with PTO pins through the pipe so I could easily remove for the day. No tool required.


Jim
 

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Here you go. Remember that the load on those bars is a lot more than just your weight, but less than 2000 lb.
 

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Thoughts, instead of the lower aluminum tubing bar, how about another cam strap with eye bolts similar to the top hammock connections?
 

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I have a U shaped thigh brace by NRS mounted to the front of my cat.


It attaches using two of the LoPro style fittings, it can easily support my weight and then some. I don't recall what pipe diameter the DRE frame uses vs NRS, but you might consider adapting to a LowPro. A shim or some machining of the LowPro could adjust diameters to match NRS makes several frame attachments that could be adapted for a hammock, or you can just buy the fitting and some cut to length pipe.


The U shaped bolt is stainless steel and the fitting is forge aluminium not cast. Much stronger than any little set screw on a cast Speed Rail fitting.
 

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I've been following this thread closely because I love sleeping on the boat but my small (Maravia Spider) raft and small 3 bay frame aren't conducive to sleeping unless you flip the boat over and sleep on the floor. I don't even own a hammock but I'm hoping this might be the solution. I would like the upright bars, hammock and light tarp to cover the hammock in case it rains to take up no more space then my tent and sleeping pad that I always bring but rarely set up.

Thoughts, instead of the lower aluminum tubing bar, how about another cam strap with eye bolts similar to the top hammock connections?
My idea was to mount the uprights for the hammock centered on the front and rear crossbars and then run straps back to the D rings located on the bow and stern of the raft by providing tension away from the center this should do the same as the crosspiece seen earlier.

Any thoughts on if this will put excessive pressure on the D rings or if I'm likely to have any other problems?
Also for those of you with hammocks, what distance between the tops of the uprights should I shoot for?
 

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The idea of a tension strap that runs over the struts and to an anchor point is a good one. It means the struts only have to work in compression and the fitting does not need to resist rotation. The force on the strap will increase as the angles change, to keep the forces down you will want to keep at least a 45 degree angle between the strut and the tie point.

It might be tough to get the geometry to work on a 16' boat, the hammock needs about 15' between 'trees' to get your butt off the ground.

Here is a handy calculator for hammock geometry....
Hammock Hang Calculator | The Ultimate Hang

If you run the strap over the strut, the force on the D rings in your application would be the same as 'chord tension' in the calculator.
 

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The idea of a tension strap that runs over the struts and to an anchor point is a good one. It means the struts only have to work in compression and the fitting does not need to resist rotation. The force on the strap will increase as the angles change, to keep the forces down you will want to keep at least a 45 degree angle between the strut and the tie point.

It might be tough to get the geometry to work on a 16' boat, the hammock needs about 15' between 'trees' to get your butt off the ground.

Here is a handy calculator for hammock geometry....
Hammock Hang Calculator | The Ultimate Hang

If you run the strap over the strut, the force on the D rings in your application would be the same as 'chord tension' in the calculator.
I use a hammock for camp sleeping a fair bit. 12-15 feet apart is optimal. As the hang calculator shows, the closer together the supports, the higher the hanging straps have to be. Some of this depends on the length of your hammock. Most hammocks are 9.5-11 ft. in length, so your hang angle may vary a little. You'll need a thermarest in the hammock unless it's very warm at night. The air under and surrounding the hammock really can make you chilly. The first time I slept overnight in my hammock on the river (Aug. Main Salmon) I thought I would freeze to death, and I like to sleep cool. On a blazing hot GC trip this might work out ok. A small tarp will provide rain coverage.
 

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Any thoughts on if this will put excessive pressure on the D rings or if I'm likely to have any other problems?
Also for those of you with hammocks, what distance between the tops of the uprights should I shoot for?

It won't if you make a superstrap running under / around your boat that just uses the dring as a guide to keep it in position.

If you've got any geometry experience you can calculate every stress by drawing a free body diagram. If you don't, draw an approximation of what you want to do (using measurements of your frame, boat, hangar arms, and your weight etc) and post on a google drawing. I can use my calculator and help figure out the stresses. Keep in mind, the hammock when weighted looks like a V and not a flat surface. The tighter you stretch it, the more stresses it applies due to the angles involved.

If you can experiment with the hammock and find a couple of trees to test it on, this makes a lot easier to know what you need to put on the boat.
 

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Prototype Integrated Hammock Stand

Hello. I built the hammock stand posted by almortal above.

Here is the development thread where I've posted lots of trial, error, progress, and pictures. I believe this is the link meant to be posted above. https://www.hammockforums.net/forum...rototype-Integrated-Hammock-Stand-for-Rafting

I successfully hammock camped for 16 days on the Grand Canyon in July of this year, 2014. I used three different configurations to pitch my hammock: 1. my integrated wood stand 2. steel stand on ground and 3. steel stand on boat. This album has a few photos of each configuration. https://imgur.com/a/5uaFb

I'm happy to answer any questions.

Santi
 
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