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Discussion Starter #1
looking for some pointers on how to not destory my jefe completely. repairing a couple cracks and don't want a bigger hole in the boat.

heat gun check
plastic check (thanks christian and tom)
already put the holes in to stop the spreading. some gorilla tapped helpped for a later run but want to get her back to 80 percent atleast.

anything help on the inside to prevent cave in besides some tape?

and when is "to hot" that it effects the plastic making it brittle?
 

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no need to drill holes to stop spreading. The trick to welding any crack is to heat the boat and the welding rods (plastic used to fill crack) to a similar temp. you need to be able to twist the rod into the crack so that it becomes one melted section. most people will just heat up the rod and drip it into the crack. this will almost always fail because the rod has not bonded with the boat plastic. it is a little bit sketchy because you don't want to over heat the boat plastic and make a bigger hole. Take it slow and be sure to keep the heat gun moving around the cracked area. when you think that the boat is getting hot enough to twist the rod into, then start to heat the rod to a temp that it will melt into the boat. keep the heat gun moving while you twist the rod in and once satisfied with the repair, use a spoon to smooth out your work. It is a touchy process which may take some practice, but it is the best way that we have found to weld boats. OBJ cracks a lot of them. Good luck
Chris
Oh, this also eliminates the need to weld on the inside of the boat
 

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Discussion Starter #3
what about patching instead of welding. that way theres no possiblility of recracking where it would be welded?
 

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Drill the holes and use a heat gun to apply Grace ice and water shield, but the welds will hole up pretty well if you are not running to much mank
 

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If you can get your hands on a completely destroyed boat, or a piece of a boat to practice on first, it will pay big dividends. You can see how much heat it takes to melt a hole, see how much heat it takes to get the plastic to the point of being able to weld, and practice with the welder.

The heat guns have a fairly large diameter and will heat a large area. This can be hard for welding and lead to overheating and holes. I use a plastic welder with a small 1/4" tip on it. You could rig up some sheet metal with a hose clamp to fashion a necked down "welding tip" with a smaller opening for your heat gun to get you more precise.

I weld 1/2" on either side of the crack to go a bit beyond the damage, and get a good weld. I think that the start and end of weld are a weak point.

If you cut a rod out of plastic out of old boat material, make it a couple inches longer than the crack, and as wide as the boat is thick. You end up with a square rod long enough to fill the entire crack.

Ditto on slowly twisting the rod into the crack. If its at the right temp, it feels like gooey taffy and will be soft and flexible, but not runny or drippy. Heat the boat and the rod together and aim to go fairly slow, maybe a couple inches per minute.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
what if i am running manky mank? i have a couple peices of jefe plastic i was going to patch it with. should work, tom had his done this way and was impressed with the job... just don't want a big ass hole in the bottom of the boat. take it slow i guess. maybe melt a little of the patch to test how long it takes to melt. thanks for the advice actually did a mini weld with a butter knife before we ran the narrows just want a good patch that will be stronger than the original part of the hull.
 

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ditto practice on the spare piece. until you can make a good weld. Heat once. The more heat the more the plastic structure brittles. That said I have put a one inch diameter stick through a boat when I over heated it and then was able to build it back out and the boat is still paddled today. Aluminum tape to back it up is nice. a good weld will last. the only thing you might do is pad it on the inside to absorb the shock. That padding could be several layers of duck tape done the welding way.

Peter
 

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crazy idea...
get a whole nother busted ass jefe. Cut it in half the long way then gorilla glue the whole 2nd hull on the bottom!

instead of just the nose cone it will be the hull condom

-rg
 

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screw trying to weld LL plastic, I tried (and had a couple of pros try) about 17 times on my last huck.

Drill the holes so it doesn't spread, toss some bitchethane on it, go play & never think about it again.

About 45% of the time, plastic welding works every time. Depending on location & skill, often it fails in the parts of the boat that flex (you know, where you probably hit the rock in the first place...) but bitch works every time as long as it's a relatively smooth part of the boat (ie: not in the nose or similar areas).

There are a chunk of folks on here with pieces, I have whole rolls that I don't need, but if you can't find any, go to home cheapo & look for grace vycor, works very well. Grace Ice & water shield is a bit stronger but you need to buy a pricey roll.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
fixed and ready to rock.. i think i need to fix the entire rest of the boat now. anyway to order a thicker boat?

why didn't anybody mention a 6 pack of bud bottles? damn it took a while. good thing i didn't forget the beer!
 
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