Mountain Buzz banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What do you pack it in and where do you store it in the boat?

I have been using a dry bag clipped to a strap attached to the d-ring on the nose. The bag sits centered against the tubes in the front. My bag is worn out and it consumes valuable/limited passenger space so I'm looking for new ideas. I like the location because it's accessible if I need it but it always seems like it's in the way. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,683 Posts
My Z drag goes in my PFD and throw bag in the beer holder in my boat. Some PFDs fit the throw bag better than my Zen. I think I'll do the Green for my next PFD.
 

·
Misspellingintothefuture!
Joined
·
1,901 Posts
Keep mine in a dry bag, on the front of my raft, as well.
I single boat some things, so I want to be able to reach under the bow of my boat if it is upside down, and easily be able to find my Z-drag and longline. Worst case scenario, I stay well within my ability's if I plan to solo boat, but at least have a chance at self recovery.
I usually make it into a footrest for the passenger, and just leave it clipped, then flip it over the bow of the boat when I unload at camp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
From a kayaker's point of view: you shouldn't depend on being able to retrieve your z-drag kit from your boat in the case that you actually need to use it. I keep my pulleys and prusik loops in my pfd and wear a throw bag belt with quick release buckle. Maybe there are some pros to also having a kit partially pre-set and attached to a raft, but I would do that as a second line of safety after the initial body kit.

On a related note: I never allow non-locking carabeaners on my raft coming from the kayak safety rule of no non-locking ******* on body or outside of boat. I notice a lot of boaters that don't seem to mind having a whistle or something on a non-locker, but I always advocate its not worth the risk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
My first rule for stowing a z-drag kit is that is must be accessible while the raft is upside down. I have flipped before and was not able to get to it and you never know when you will need it, dress to swim rig to flip. I carry my kit strapped to my frame in the front of the boat on the sideboard with a loop strap so there is one cam buckle to remove and I can grab it quickly. I use a Ortlieb dry bag for my kit, I like to keep everything dry and I also carry my first aid kit in it so i have one "emergency" bag when I need it.

The contents of the bag are some what personal and up to you and your understanding of ropes and mechanical advantage systems. The basics are a static rope of appropriate length and diameter. When I do the Grand or other big water situations I take my 200' 11mm rope when I am in Clear Creek in Colorado I take a 50' length of a 9mm rope.

The hardware you will need it at a minimum 2 pulleys (larger the diameter of the pulley the less friction you will have), 6 locking carabiners, 2 prusiks, and anchor material ( I use 20' lengths of tubuler webbing).

You can vary that depending on what you are doing, I carry an extra pulley or two and a lot of anchor material and from time to time I will throw in a set of nuts (rock climbing pro) if I am running something with out a lot of trees.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Right, accessibility is key for me as well, that’s why I keep mine in the bow, like mattman. As an alternative, I was considering using it as a back support behind the rower but, in a flip, it might get tangled with some gear. It’s much better to have it isolated in an open, uncluttered area, like on the frame as suggested by jspoon. I also like combining pin and first aid together in a bag. Makes sense for a lot of reasons. Right now I’m leaning toward a horizontal access bag, about 70l. Because of price, I hesitate to buy a good one but this discussion is helping me rationalize the extra expense for something decent.

And for DBK, you might like this. MountainBuzz = extensive discussion solving issues that are not problems. Thanks for your responses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,683 Posts
MountainBuzz = extensive discussion solving issues that are not problems.
Not 100% sure where this is going but ya, we sure can sweat the small stuff.


Plus its getting close to the end of the permit waiting game. The rivers are frozen. The hills are a bit icey. I need a dumping event or a melting event!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
I use a 40 liter dry bag for my kit and it is more than large enough, also it is red for high visibility.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
I have always stored it in a dry bag on the side boards next to my rowing seat. I have a recent idea that I am thinking about trying. Instead of stopping the bag down with a cam strap what if I used a Astral Rescue Belt (a replacement for the GreenJacket)? If I used the rescue belt then I could attach the release pull strap/ball thing to the handle of the watershed bag, then I could just grab the handle to the bag and pull hard and the bag would release.

Im just trying to think of the easiest way to free the bag quickly in an emergency or while the boat is upside down. However in reality your z-drag kit is like backcountry Avy gear, you carry it to rescue others and they should carry it to rescue you.

After a bad experience a few years back when a throw bag rope snapped while my boat was pinned I started carrying a pretty serious pin kit. Now I carry a big static rope and all the other good gear. I also put my first aid kit in there. I also carry some gear in my PFD.
 

·
Down in Brazil
Joined
·
34 Posts
Like what Treswright3 said don't you carry a pin kit to rescue others and others carry to rescue you?

Knock on wood but I have never needed to get to the pin kit on a pinned raft. We have just used one off another buddies raft. I am thinking a little pre trip planning on who all has pin kits and what is in theirs can give you the piece of mind. You can then get it off your bow and to another location that is accessible to help a friend but not in the way.

Solo trips are a different animal.

Curious....those of you that have had to get to your pin kit on the pinned boat what was the circumstances? Why was is necessary?

I like to carry my pin kit separate to my first aid kit. That way I can carry just my first aid kit to camp or on a hike or even a scout.


Sent from my iPhone using Mountain Buzz
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Seems silly to me that people are prioritizing QUICK access to the z drag kit. Setting up a z drag is not something you want to do hastily, there are consequences to rushing and setting poor anchors, tying bad knots, using frayed ropes, etc. When it comes to un pinning a boat, GENERALLY speaking, you've got some time.

There are also consequences for having your z drag kit sloppily lashed on your frame somewhere. From passengers getting snagged on the gear to losing a giant rope in the river (huge hazard) there are a lot of reasons to stow that gear away.

I have mine in my front hatch and I'm comfortable with the fact that if my boat gets pinned, I won't be able to use my z drag kit on my own boat. That's what friends are for. It's like an avy beacon, you don't wear it to save yourself, but to find your friends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
I agree 527 and others. keep it stowed safe and take your time to z drag correctly and safely for other river users. But also, maximizing accessibility should not be overlooked. I hope my buddies would dig me out of an avy but that doesn't mean i don't wear a float pack to take care of myself as much as possible.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Mountain Buzz mobile app
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top