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Discussion Starter #1
Curious if anyone has done a rhino lining spray on to the top of their trailer decking? I have a Sportrail and it has essentially OSB and was looking for some either paint on or spray on finish. Any suggestions??
 

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Rhino lining is pretty rough, so if its for a raft trailer then it might be a bit too abrasive. Not sure how well it works on wood either.

A lot of guys use Deck Over, which is typically used as a durable coating on patio's and decks (the home variety). A couple different make ups and textures so probably worth a read before you throw down.

There is always the option of a good stain and some polyurethane too.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah I didn't know how rough the Rino lining was so thanks for the heads up there. I'll check out the Deck over, never heard of it.
 

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Deckover will be worse. It's a grippy deck coating. I use two strips of HDPE sheeting, about 18 inches wide. Fastening it is a bit tricky but I can describe it if you'd like

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Elkhaven- interested in the HDPE, where do you get it and how did you fastenen it? Thanks a bunch. Gearing up for the season and the existing deck is a bit rough for my liking.
 

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I've been using Eco-stain for years on wood surfaces that are exposed to the elements including fencing, trailer decks, house trim, etc. It has a very good UV resistance, it patinas nicely over time, and and so far so good as far as holding up to weather. A remarkable product, and cost effective to boot.
 

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Elkhaven- interested in the HDPE, where do you get it and how did you fastenen it? Thanks a bunch. Gearing up for the season and the existing deck is a bit rough for my liking.
I get it at Medards, but a little research in your area might locate other sources. This is what it is:http://www.menards.com/main/buildin...nsity-polyethylene-sheets/p-1444441877488.htm

I got the 1/4" sheet for about $60 a year ago. I don't know if the price has gone up, but it's now is double that. The 1/8" sheet will work fine and I would have gotten that if they had it in stock at the time. It has a textured side and a smooth side. I put the smooth side up but I doubt it matters much.

Attachment isn't particularly difficult, just a little tedious. If you have buddies interested a 12" strip is likely enough, so you could get 4 pieces out of a 4x8 sheet. I did 16" for some reason. I marked the center of each side tube and centered my strips on those marks. This put the bolt heads out of play, though they shouldn't affect the tubes even if the boat were sitting on them as they're well rounded and smoothed off.

I attach an 8 foot strip with 8 carriage bolts. 4 in each corner and two on each side. The key is to allow it to shrink and expand (which it does a lot). If you just screw it down, it buckles up when it's hot. So what you do is cut the 8 slots parallel to the long sides in each piece about 2 inches long. To do this, I lay out the slots where they won't interfere with anything under the decking (cross braces, etc.) then drill out each end of the slot with a drill bit the same diameter as the carriage bolt. Then mark and cut lines that connect the outer edges of each hole, creating the slot. The carriage bolt will then hold (like a wrench) in the slot. Drill holes in the center of the slot through your existing decking, add a fender washer underneath the whole set up than a nylock nut. It helps to have some one holding down on the carriage bolt while you tighten it. Just take out the play in the bolt but don't tighten it so it squeezes the hdpe to the decking. Being slightly loose will allow the sheeting to expand and contract with temperature changes but it will be held in place. If carriage bolts don't work with the 1/8" sheeting (the shoulder of the bolt will contact the decking) just get wide pan head screws and tighten the same, you'll just have to have two people - one to hold the screw and one to tighten the nut (our vice versa, what ever works). I think the carriage bolt should indent into the decking so, I'd suspect that they'll work but haven't tried it on the 1/8" to be sure.

When this is all done you have a very slippery strip down each side and something more grippy (depending on your decking) down the middle. If you wanted more grip in the middle, you could then line-x the middle or add grit to paint or go the deckover route, or... whatever you like really.

If you just want to test how you like it, just screw it down where you think you might put the slots down the road. I ran mine like this for a year and it works fine, but it doesn't eventually stress the screws and they break and it bubbles up in between looking kind of half assed. A buddy of mine tried numerous different attachment methods on his and found the carriage bolt to work the best.

Good luck to you and thanks for being patient. I didn't want to type all that on my phone!
 

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That surprises me that your trailer has OSB. I bought mine in 2015 and it has a marine plywood deck. I just put down a piece of outdoor carpeting and was good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Welp finally got around to working on this project. First picture is deck with the rough Advantek mostly gone. Pic #2 is after a round of sanding and then 3 coats of Deckover. Next up is HDPE strips on either side where the tubes sit. Thanks everyone for their help and advice.
 
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