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Kjirsten
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Discussion Starter #1
How does the Odyssey raft compare to Aire or Maravia? The one I'm looking at is only a year old, so it is probably PVC. The price looks good but I don't really know anything about these rafts. I searched for other threads but only got info on how to repair them.

The ad:
"This raft is one year old & just like new...it has been used 6 times...it has been stored inside & is in immaculate condition. It includes a Mad Dog oaring frame with 8' Carlisle oars & 4 new 6' paddles that can be used without the oaring frame. It also includes an electric & manual pump, safety rope, rescue bag, cargo net, all needed nylon straps & 2 Coast Guard rated life vests. It is salmon red with gray in color & has a full wrap floor that is also inflatable." They're asking $2500. Is this reasonable?

I am partial to Aire, but have also been considering Hyside because of the Hypalon/ weight/ etc. I've rowed/ paddled both and I'm really torn at this point about which way to go. Is it just personal preference or is one really better than the other? (I hate the NRS Otters.)
 

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Hi TMTR -

Will you tell me what you hate about the Otter? I have a 13' that I have many gripes with, and I am just wondering what yours are.

I though O's were a "recreational" raft, not on par with NRS, Maravia, SOTAR, etc, but I don't put any money on that opinion.

Laura
 

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Too much if the raft is a PVC. Also depends on year. I own a 4 year old star pvc boat, and really like it, but don't expect it to hold together much past 10-12 years. That 10-12 years has nothing to do with age, so if the raft is older, its life span has diminished, even if sitting int he garage partially inflated. I don't know for $2500 I would try to buck up a little more, check swiftwatersports, they have some cool looking packages on the tribs.....I think for about $500 more....
cheers
jefe
 

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Kjirsten
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Discussion Starter #4
The Otters don't track well because they sit too high in the water; they are very light, which on the ground is great- on big water is not; and the location of the rear D-ring never fails to rip my knuckles open when I'm running a paddle boat. (We run a couple of them commercially.) They are also more difficult to get back into because of the tube diameter and how high they sit in the water and more difficult to climb on top of when upside down for the same reasons. Some of these things I will attribute to my height and weight, but regardless, for me, the Otter is not the right boat.
 

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Hmm, that's not my experience at all. I think they sit low in the water, and am seriously thinking about getting taller oar stands. I am tall, and I really had to fiddle with the rigging to avoid the oar handles from hitting my knees when I have to lift the oar blades high out of the water. Sometimes I wonder if I got an odd boat (bought it used) because of this weird problem. I've never heard of anyone else having it, well maybe one person. On my boat, the tubes are noticeably smaller than my friends 14' NRS boats, and even the NRS specs say that.

Amazing how people can have such different experiences with the same gear, but we have to deal with what works for each of us and make our choices.

The Otters don't track well because they sit too high in the water; they are very light, which on the ground is great- on big water is not; and the location of the rear D-ring never fails to rip my knuckles open when I'm running a paddle boat. (We run a couple of them commercially.) They are also more difficult to get back into because of the tube diameter and how high they sit in the water and more difficult to climb on top of when upside down for the same reasons. Some of these things I will attribute to my height and weight, but regardless, for me, the Otter is not the right boat.
 

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Kjirsten
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Discussion Starter #6
I think we're talking about the same problem in different ways. Are your knees close to the oar stands because the floor is so high off the water and your feet are higher up? We run a 13' and a 14' in our fleet and the tubes on the 13' are noticeably smaller than the 14'. Both have the problem of not really being deep enough inside I don't think. It is the floor that sits high in the water, not the tubes necessarily- I think this throws the tracking off, makes the boat less stable, and harder to maneuver. And I hate that F-king D-Ring on the back- my knuckles are scarred.:)
 

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YES! We are talking about the same thing. But I've not ever thought it had problems tracking, or unstable or harder to maneuver. But, it is my first boat, except I just rowed an 18' NRS down the grand and can't say that my impression was that my little boat was as you say. We'll see this weekend how that little otter feels now when I get it out on the river this weekend.

I've tried overinflating the floor, underinflating, and it never changes. You are right, but I don't understand how it ends up like that since the attachment point seems the same as on other boats. Maybe the floor is just too wide and it floats up???

My friends 14'NRS have way more vertical room between the floor and the frame, much more than my Otter.

I think we're talking about the same problem in different ways. Are your knees close to the oar stands because the floor is so high off the water and your feet are higher up? We run a 13' and a 14' in our fleet and the tubes on the 13' are noticeably smaller than the 14'. Both have the problem of not really being deep enough inside I don't think. It is the floor that sits high in the water, not the tubes necessarily- I think this throws the tracking off, makes the boat less stable, and harder to maneuver. And I hate that F-king D-Ring on the back- my knuckles are scarred.:)
 

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Kirsten,

Do some more research before you buy the boat. If it is a glued PVC boat, it will not last very long. If it is hypalon, it might me alright. I don't know much about that brand. I would be skeptical if you are looking for a boat that last. $2500 seems high for an off brand.

Side: I also don't like the Otters too well, but for different reasons. I think that they paddle real nice, but the material is really thin and rips easily. I have put on several patches on my buddy's that seem to appear out of nowhere during transportation.

Good luck,
Dan

How does the Odyssey raft compare to Aire or Maravia? The one I'm looking at is only a year old, so it is probably PVC. The price looks good but I don't really know anything about these rafts. I searched for other threads but only got info on how to repair them.

The ad:
"This raft is one year old & just like new...it has been used 6 times...it has been stored inside & is in immaculate condition. It includes a Mad Dog oaring frame with 8' Carlisle oars & 4 new 6' paddles that can be used without the oaring frame. It also includes an electric & manual pump, safety rope, rescue bag, cargo net, all needed nylon straps & 2 Coast Guard rated life vests. It is salmon red with gray in color & has a full wrap floor that is also inflatable." They're asking $2500. Is this reasonable?

I am partial to Aire, but have also been considering Hyside because of the Hypalon/ weight/ etc. I've rowed/ paddled both and I'm really torn at this point about which way to go. Is it just personal preference or is one really better than the other? (I hate the NRS Otters.)
 

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Kjirsten
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Discussion Starter #9
Maybe this is a better example. I think the floors on the Otters are built to be level with the tubes on the bottom of the boat. For example, the Aires and Hysides have a wide indentation between the tube and the bottom of the boat, easier to grab a hold of when the boat is upside down. There isn't really anything to grab on the Otter, so your hands just slide off. I think they are built to inflate upward, if that makes sense, making the interior of the floor more "bubbled" if you will, than the bottom. In addition, the interior of the Aires are flat because of the bladder, but Hysides, even with the Ibeams, tend to inflate more downward than upward, leaving plenty of foot room inside and providing a good hold underneath. Not that I flip a lot of boats, but even in practice I can tell that I would not want to try climbing on top of an Otter in a rapid. I think this is also why they don't track well- less surface area on the boat is actually touching the water. I've heard this from others as well.

Hi Dan! How the hell are ya? I agree that the Otters are made of cheap material in addition to the other problems.
 

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TMTR,

To get back to your question -the Oddessy is probably a glued PVC you'll actually see on a lot of the rivers where Laura is. I saw quite a few up in MT last year and helped a guy get a really good deal on a 14' SB w/ NRS fishing frame as a starter boat that he'll use as a Class III whitewater & family camping trip boat.

I don't know about their gluding technology but the material seemed like decent-weight PVC with chafer pads where it counts and a thick bottom. It seemed like a decent boat and they're going pretty cheap - kind of like Vanguards a few years back but with a little lighter-weight construction.

The things to consider before plunking down for the this boat are: what length is it? what's the frame like (e.g. high-value sturdy breakdown aluminum or 1-piece flimsy welded steel)? and mainly, what is your intended use (Animas or family trips)?

You'd be getting a lot of extras in the deal so its river-ready but if you've been around boating awhile you may have a lot of that stuff or be able to score it all easily.

Consider it an $1800 boat with all the extras thrown in for $700. Put that way, the thought of picking up some rubber off an outfitter and scroung the frame & kit doesn't sound that bad...

Is this what you really want?
http://www.mountainbuzz.com/swap/showproduct.php?product=9676&limit=recent
Pick up some Cataracts and you'd have a sweet little rig for a just a little more...

-AH
 

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Kjirsten
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Discussion Starter #11
Andy, thanks for the input.

I would be running anything from the Animas and family trips to class IV's and V's.

I do have quite a bit of boating gear already...

It sounds like you don't have a lot of faith in these rafts for big rapids. I think I'll keep looking. That Maravia looks like a sweet deal, but I really want a 14' boat.
 

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Odyssey in Missoula, MT with frame for $1600

Hey I just joined this forum and saw you were checking out Odyssey's. I have a 12.6' Odyssey for sale with three Carlisle padals (one damaged) and a three seat fishing frame which comes in two parts but all one piece welded steal and solid welds. Let me know if you are interested. Just posted it on craigslist 12.6' Odyssey Raft with Fly Fishing Frame
[email protected]
 

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Hey I just joined this forum and saw you were checking out Odyssey's. I have a 12.6' Odyssey for sale with three Carlisle padals (one damaged) and a three seat fishing frame which comes in two parts but all one piece welded steal and solid welds. Let me know if you are interested. Just posted it on craigslist 12.6' Odyssey Raft with Fly Fishing Frame
[email protected]
This thread is about 2 yrs old, I am pretty sure TMTTR already has purchased her own raft. You should post your boat in the swap so more people who are looking for boats can check it out.
 

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Odyssey boat questions

I know this is an old thread but for what it is worth. I own a company that sells rafts. I had heard of Odysseys and have taken the last two years researching them and testing and having some whitewater professionals and inflatable repair professionals look at them. I now am the primary distributor in Oregon and sell many in Washington.
The Odyssey boat has really evolved. In the past few years it has stepped up from a recreational boat to a full Guide/Outfitter quality. Made of 1100 Denier, German proprietary Valmex/Mahler PVC the Odyssey boasts the heaviest duty PVC of most boats built. It also is DUAL thermo seam welded inside and out so there is NO gluing to come loose in 3-5yrs. They have a double layer wrap floor, a full double wrap of bottom tube, plus a top and bottom chaffe strip!! They have 6 carry handles and 12 D rings and Leafield 7 valves. To top it off they have a 3 year materials and workmanship warranty that is covered by my authorized repair facility for small repairs or major repairs or replacement in Clancy,Montana at the headquarters.
These boats in my and many others opinions are by far the best "price point" boat money can buy. They are GREAT quality, durable and WILL last you for many many years.
Thanks for reading.
Timmy
 

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I have had my 14ft Odessy for 12years. I average about 200-300 river miles a year with it. I finally now have a few slow leaks. I have taken it down class IV rapids multiple times. I really like the bow rocker in it. The tubes are big enough to eat most waves. I agree with Tim’s comments above. However if wish to roll this boat up, probaly not the best option, and also for storage. Rolling up PVC boats makes weak points. Lastly before I purchased, I called the owner and he taken them down the Grand Canyon, and I like they are welded.
 

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We had a 15 year old 14 footer that allways worked but we are mostly flatwater floaters. My wife won it in a raffle and now we have a aire and our neighbors use it. It still holds air and works. Its ugly and has never been babied. Dunno why it held together but it's hard to say it sucked cause it didnt and it's still going down rivers. So that one wasnt built on Friday I guess. I never measured anything but it has big tubes for a 14 ft boat. They are super ugly though lol
 
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