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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
HI All,

Wondering if I could ask advice on using 1 1/2" aluminum pipe (6061 T6) as an oar shaft for an 8ft. whitewater oar. The od would be fine at 1 7/8". My main, possibly ridiculous concern is it not bending quick enough in a jam as the wall thickness is greater than that of the aluminum tubing in the Carlisle shafts, and causing problems by stressing elsewhere on the raft.

Ty
 

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I've got one 8' Sawyer rope-wrapped MX-FG shaft that's yours if you'll give it new life.
 

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I wouldn't worry about that...you lock would break as its brass, just carry extras. That sounds like sch 40 dims, sch 10 should still have the same OD but considerably thinner wall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Correct. It is sch 40. In the future I will order sch 20, if I can find it. Save me from having to hone the inside diameter to accept the blade!. I will order extra locks. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Andy H Thank you! I didn't expect my first post to garner offers of free gear! But alas I live in Canada...unless I am wrong I think the shipping and the border might be more expense and hassle than it's worth. If anyone reads this and knows otherwise lmk!
 

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I think you're going to be real disappointed using pipe for oar shafts... no flex, heavy, dead, just so many qualities lacking. Better off to find a good piece of straight grained wood and start whittling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think you're going to be real disappointed using pipe for oar shafts... no flex, heavy, dead, just so many qualities lacking. Better off to find a good piece of straight grained wood and start whittling.
Does that include the Carlisle style oars that have aluminum tubing inside? Or are they thin enough to flex?
 

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If they're your first then go ahead and get come Carliles and you won't know a y better. And hey're actually made of cast iron.... :)
 

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I have used aluminum tubing oars for about 24 years, had three sets in 9 ft, 10 ft, 12 ft. I did not find them that heavy. Of course I learned to row on 12 ft Apitong wood oars that weigh a ton, If you stack three of them on top of each other you could lift the back of a F150 to change a tire. Your idea sounds like it will work. The beauty of the aluminum shaft oar is zero maintenance and pretty much indestructible, they were sch 40 pipe. Here's a picture of me with the 10 ft oars. The oars were built from the same material as Speed Rail take down frame in the picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ty for that. May I ask what you used for handles and blades and how you attached them?
If they're your first then go ahead and get come Carliles and you won't know a y better. And hey're actually made of cast iron.... :)
I am assuming you are kidding about the cast iron.
 

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I have used these 1 7/8 in shafts for years. You have to hone the blade end of the shaft with a cylinder hone to get the correct size for the carslise or dyna blades. I had a friend turn some hickory handles for the grips. They have lasted 38 years with no problems.

PW
 

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I think you're going to be real disappointed using pipe for oar shafts... no flex, heavy, dead, just so many qualities lacking. Better off to find a good piece of straight grained wood and start whittling.
^^^
Seriously. Aluminum doesn't flex well. Something has to give, and over time you will feel it in your shoulders.
I'll admit I'm a wood snob, but its also what makes my body feel best.

Does that include the Carlisle style oars that have aluminum tubing inside? Or are they thin enough to flex?
Not really. It's a pretty dull flex.

What is the wood of choice?
There are "choice" woods like ash, spruce, and douglas fir, but honestly you can make oars out of just about any wood. White pine is a little too light, and tropical hardwoods are too heavy. Like B4otter said, the best woods are straight-grained. You live in Canadia with a rich canoe tradition..and all their paddles were wood, so you should be able to find something!! Cherry and sassafras were also popular canoe paddle woods, but may be hard to find in oar lengths.

Ty for that. May I ask what you used for handles and blades and how you attached them?

I am assuming you are kidding about the cast iron.
Wood. Haha.

No, just feels like it.
 

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Ty for that. May I ask what you used for handles and blades and how you attached them?

I am assuming you are kidding about the cast iron.
Here is a better picture. I purchased my first three 10 footers from Down River Equipment co. around 1986. Than for my other two boats I just purchased 6 handles and 6 blades, than I purchased the aluminum pipe from Alreco Aluminum co., I used a chop saw to cut the pipe for my other 2 sets of oars and inserted the handles and blades into the pipe, I used the counter set screws to fasten the blades and handles to the oar shaft, you can see them in the picture. My other sets of oars were wooden Gull-Wing oars. At one time my quiver of boats totalled 7 boats. I agree each oar has a different feel to it, even if you purchase a new set of 3 wooden oars for your boat, each oar will have a different feel(character) to it in flex, weight, etc. like my ex-wive's. I would of loved to own a pair of custom made oars like I see on MB here.
 

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I am assuming you are kidding about the cast iron.
I actually have Cataract shafts and Carlisle blades. The Carlisle shafts only feel like they're cast iron compared to the Cats.
 
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