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I am putting together a fishing raft and need to know what length oars will be best for my rig. I have a 13' NRS E130 and a StreamTech fishing frame. I was thinking 8.5' oars. Chime in if you have any thoughts/ideas! Thanks.
 

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8.5 or 9. can't remember which i had with my 13' boat but it was one of those. for the new boat i looked to the NRS guide for oar length, and it's perfect for me (9' for a 14' boat best i remember).
 

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8.5 to 9' sounds right for a 13 footer, but oar length is really dictated by the distance between the oar locks on your frame. Measure the distance between oarlocks, divide in half, and multiply by 3 for total oar length. that should will give you a good starting point.

That said- that Stream tech frame looks pretty narrow for that boat (could be a camera angle?). I think those were designed for maravia spyders which are narrow, agile boats. You want the width of the frame to extend a couple inches past the centerline of each tube- on my E136 the frame rests on the outside of the chafer. you can see the part of the frame that hangs down to the sides of the rowers compartment don't seem to touch the tubes. That could be anywhere from a minor annoyance to an entrapment hazard, but it looks like a sign that the frame doesn't fit well.

Fit the frame to the boat, then you to the frame, then the oars/oar towers that are right for that combination. Otherwise you will be chasing around earlier mistakes and trying to row a 13' raft with ill-fitting frame, and short oars (designed for the smaller, narrower boat that your frame was meant to fit)

Make sure the frame fits right before you compound the problem (and investment) with short oars that fit the frame (rows ok, but frame can slip, can't fit full size coolers etc. and less than optimal power) or the longer, correct oars that fit the boat but rows like lead till you get the right frame.

Maybe i'm not seeing the frame right, and all this is gibberish...Gotta go pack for the Ark this weekend...
 

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Not sure why everyone talks about the length of their boat instead of width of their towers (and height being another main factor), but probably 8.5-9.5 depending on your tastes.
 

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That said- that Stream tech frame looks pretty narrow for that boat (could be a camera angle?). I think those were designed for maravia spyders which are narrow, agile boats. You want the width of the frame to extend a couple inches past the centerline of each tube
Good eye Piglet. The frame does not fit this boat perfectly. The frame rests just inside the centerline of the tubes. This is my first rig and I couldn't pass up the StreamTech frame ($200) and the almost new E130 ($1800). I rested the ST frame on a Super Puma and fit just about perfect. Unfortunately money is tight and I am going to have to make this work. Do you think the sizing/fit of this set up is going to cause me problems on the river or is it just going to create a minor performance sacrifice? Let me know - I would be interested to hear what you have to say. Thanks man.
 

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If you are just fishing you will probably be fine, get some cheap used oars and cut 'em down if necessary. On technical whitewater I would never run a frame shorter than center to center tube, and short oars while faster may not provide the necessary leverage to move your boat efficiently through rapids.
 

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the mismatch is limiting both item's abilities. It's like getting a steal of a deal on a bike that doesn't fit-eventually you realize it still sucks. Only this time you will have dropped another $2-300 on oars that you can't use either because they are too short for the width of your boat. you will likely have storage issues, weird rowing traits, not efficient at moving around the river, not have enough leverage to hold in one spot while a fisherman gets an extra cast in a hole, always rowing like a man possessed to make moves that should only take one stroke, slip your leg in a gap and get stuck/hurt/drown, etc. Maybe you get used to it, and it IS just a minor performance sacrifice. This is a tinkering hobby- people in this sport spend $$$ all the time for minor performance increases to create their perfect boats (carbon oars, blades, counterbalances, rigging minutia etc) this would be a bigger issue than those, and one you can't easily fix or upgrade when the annoyance becomes too great.

Since you got deals on both items, pick which one you like the best, and sell the other for more than you paid. if fishing is what you want, sell the boat, buy a Super Puma or similar, and have one of the slickest fishing setups out there. that frame was designed for a hard Aire or Maravia floor- its less than ideal to stand on a mushy, wet hypalon floor like the NRS. It will work, but I wouldn't guide clients like that. You would want to add floors if the frame stays in its present combination with the NRS. (you don't need all that for fishing but that's another topic...)

if you want to to do overnights and whitewater too, sell the frame and get a used NRS, Rowframe.com or make a frame from parts (cheapest) you can do any of the aforementioned easily with the $5-700 you might be able to get for the frame (with leftover for oars). then you will be able to customize your boat for what ever you want and take advantage of the NRS' width. BTW- the ladies prefer loungy spots instead of fishing seats and anchors.

As you say, money is tight and you have to make do, but I would rather make do with a correct frame, that maybe doesn't have an integrated anchor system/rear seat instead of a fancy frame that doesn't fit.
 

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Thanks for the feedback guys. Guess I will just have to get out on the water and see for myself! I will report back my findings in a couple weeks once my busted leg gets a little better...
 

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What if oars are too long?

I have a Aire 130D. I made a frame and the oar locks are 66" apart. On a recommendation I bought 10 foot oars knowing they will more than likely be too long. I figure I can cut them down.(carlisles) So now I have more like a 1/4 in and 3/4 out rather than the 1/3-2/3. Will my only problem be a heavy oar? I'm getting it out this weekend to try it before I buy my third back up oar. Anything to watch out for?
 

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I have a Aire 130D. I made a frame and the oar locks are 66" apart. On a recommendation I bought 10 foot oars knowing they will more than likely be too long. I figure I can cut them down.(carlisles) So now I have more like a 1/4 in and 3/4 out rather than the 1/3-2/3. Will my only problem be a heavy oar? I'm getting it out this weekend to try it before I buy my third back up oar. Anything to watch out for?

Not just heavy the oar will have much more leverage on you, your arms, your body, your soul. Cut 'em down or trade for shorter ones.

8.5s sound like they would be perfect for you. Maybe even 8s.
 

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No way on 8 footers. I ran this length on a 60" frame and it was too short

Ive got a lot of friends run 9' on a 60" frame. One has a 130d. They describe the length as great, but both of them have good upper body strength.

I run 9.5 on my 66" frame and 10 on my 72" frame so you are not too far off. I found 9.5 too short for 72" would prefer 10.5 if i could do it again

If you do this, You will want to cut the handle side. There are some posts on this keep in mind Carlisles use an inner sleeve so you might have to use a lathe to turn down the plastic handles if removing more than a few inches
 

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Maybe 8.5 if just using for fishing and if you sit real high like on a cooler
 

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I had a feeling I should have gone with the 9's. Live and learn. I read the posts on cutting the carlisles. I don't have time to cut them before the weekend.
 

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Im sure there are some people local to you who would want to trade up to 10's

Ive cut down cataracts its much easier
 

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I am putting together a fishing raft and need to know what length oars will be best for my rig. I have a 13' NRS E130 and a StreamTech fishing frame. I was thinking 8.5' oars. Chime in if you have any thoughts/ideas! Thanks.
I had this same raft, and initially had 8.5' oars, and didn't like them at all. I then went to 9' which was perfect.

The 8.5' oars felt like I didn't get any purchase at all compared to the longer ones.

You could take it to the raft shop and try them both put, by taking off the blades and seeing where the end of the shaft falls (simulating a waterline)
 

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An item that I never see discussed is the width of the blade you plan to use. The resulting leverage makes a big difference. I have seen oarsman pulled out of their seats by too long of shaft and/or too much blade. I actually used to carry narrow(er) blades for my daughter to use when rowing. One may be good with an 8" blade on 8 1/2' oars or with 6" blades on 10's. Nothing better than trial and error.

Good luck :)
 

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I decided to cut the oars. It took about an hour to have the handles glued back in. The oars sure lightened up and with my 8 inch blades I think I will have plenty of power. This way my wife should like them better. Thanks for the information.
 

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One thing about shorter oars is that the angle changes to a bit higher which keeps the handles out of your knees. I saw some knee banging going on out there and sometimes do myself - usually in heavier waves when the waves bring up the oar up when down in the trough and trying to grab a stroke.
 
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