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Looking at purchasing a raft to throw a fishing frame on it to guide out of this summer. Ive been doing nothing but research on boats lately. Im not on a strict budget but on a budget none the less. Im leaning towards an NRS outlaw I really like the drop stitch floor for a stiff floor for fishing and the 2,000 is a great price. However whats the durability of this boat? How long can I expect it to last.
Also looking at a 14' RMR raft still a good price point and they seem to be making better rafts. my goal is to spend 4000 on a boat and frame setup, give or take 500.
I do not want a Saturn I hear much more bad then good about Saturn.
on a side note I have a chance to but a super puma with a fishing frame the boat however has seen a few 100plus days on the water and i work about its durability. he wants 4000 for it. is it a good deal? i feel its over priced. i also think a 14' boat will be better for guiding. i look forward to hearing from you guys thanks.
 

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Jared
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They are new to market, so probably not a lot of feedback yet. RMR also makes a 14' drop stitch floor model, and I do have some experience with it. (In fact, I am hitting the river with him tomorrow) I like the RMR boats for their construction and the amount of protection, they have frame chafes and the floors and side tubes are wrapped. They are not light, and they don't roll up really well. I don't know how the Outlaw compares in weight and rolling up.
If you get the Outlaw, let us know how it goes
 

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I don't have any experience with either the NRS Outlaw or the RMR. Both are Chinese made boats, but both made by quality companies from what I hear. I looked into the NRS Outlaw when I was looking for my boat. and like you could not find much on them. I do however remember reading something like the floor is not the same as other rafts and was something to avoid.

The RMR has some features of higher end boats including the lace in floor. From what I hear RMR started off a little sketchy, but have become quality boats that a lot of people are really enjoying.

As far as the Puma goes, it really depends on a lot of variable on weather or not that is a good deal. How old is the boat, what type of frame, thwarts, any patches... It retails for about $3000 without thwarts and $3700 with 3 thwarts.

The 14' Tributary (Aires Chinese boat) is $3000 retail standard with 3 thwarts, and a laced in drop stitch floor. I am a big fan of Aire and I like the bladder system they use. PS the Tributary and RMR boats both have a 5 year warranty.

http://www.nrs.com/product/86039.01/nrs-outlaw-140-self-bailing-rafts

http://rockymountainrafts.com/14_raft.html

http://aire.com/aire/products/default.aspx?id=204

http://aire.com/aire/products/default.aspx?id=222


Hope this helps!
 

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I have not really heard from anyone who has rowed or put hands on an outlaw. I believe the floor is a glued down drop stich designed similarly to the saturn floors that get all the flack for foot entrapment. I was disappointed when I relaized NRS had gone that route for the floor, even though I'm not *really* sure it's a huge issue. From NRS I expect it to be plenty durable and it is really light right? I like light boats, which the RMRs are definitely NOT light.

IMO that puma is overpriced.

I'm with steve in that I would consider a tributary in your situation.
 

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Jared
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The Aire floors (including the trib) are an I-beam design inside of the floor pocket, they are more like a typical floor than a drop stitch floor. They look smooth on the outside like a drop stitch due to the bladder design. The floor in the Outlaw is not glued down, it uses the BAT attachment system like the thwarts on NRS rafts. So the inflated part of the Outlaw floor can be removed, but the main floor layer is permanently in place. The RMR boats used a lace in floor in either design. (Remember, the drop stitch floor is an option on RMR boats) I had to ask those questions of NRS to find out that much myself.
 

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The Aire floors (including the trib) are an I-beam design inside of the floor pocket, they are more like a typical floor than a drop stitch floor. They look smooth on the outside like a drop stitch due to the bladder design. The floor in the Outlaw is not glued down, it uses the BAT attachment system like the thwarts on NRS rafts. So the inflated part of the Outlaw floor can be removed, but the main floor layer is permanently in place. The RMR boats used a lace in floor in either design. (Remember, the drop stitch floor is an option on RMR boats) I had to ask those questions of NRS to find out that much myself.
My bad. I thought I remembered hearing they were drop stitch. They should still be more stable than a standard I-beam though.

Here are the Aire floor options explained for the OP.

http://aire.com/aire/why_aire/default.aspx?page=8
 

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floor in the Outlaw is not glued down, it uses the BAT attachment system like the thwarts on NRS rafts.QUOTE]

Thanks for correcting me....now that you mention it I do remember them not being glued and that is precisely what scared me about the design. I did not know they used the BAT attachment system for it.

Maybe it wouldn't be as dangerous but I'm having a hard time envisioning where the BAT loops would be located? On the side of the floor and low on the tubes? On the underside of the drop stitch and top of the floor?
 

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Jared
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If you look on their website I posted a question about it and they responded. Sounds like you deflate the floor and the bat strips are under the floor. I'm not sure I like the design. but I haven't paddled one, so I can't say yet. I like the DS floor on the RMR, made it a point to stand on his raft today.
 

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I've got a 14' Outlaw that I bought as a factory imperfect at the end of the summer. I've only been out on it a couple times so far, so I have limited on-the-water experience with it so far. But, I think it's a great boat for the price. I have several buddies with RMRs, so here are my 2c on the two boats:

NRS Outlaw:
*The drop-stitch floor was great for my buddies fishing off of it
*Bigger tubes (21")
*Wider at 7'2", but feels like it has slightly less storage space due to larger tubes
*Thicker tube material 48oz/sqyd
*Thicker floor material 68oz/sqyd (this is the bottom of the boat floor. the actual drop stitch floor is a completely separate and removable unit, and is thinner than both the floor and the tubes)
*BAT attachment system for floor = totally removable, and the bladder is not directly exposed to abrasion
*Lighter at 145lb (likely due to floor design, less d-rings, handles, less wrap/protection material)
*Additional wear layers on bottom of tubes + up a portion of the side of the tubes (not as high as RMR though)
*Frame chafe strips on top of tubes
*Additional urethane (?) patches on bottom corners
*Inferior outfitting (less handles, d-rings, etc)
*BAT attachment is superior to RMR's card attachment for thwarts (in my opinion)
*Comes with a solid repair kit
*Generally felt like the boat construction was superior; seams were more consistent
*Cheaper

RMR:
*Smaller tubes (20")
*Narrower at 6'10"
*Thinner tube material 44oz/sqyd
*Not sure on floor material weight
*Heavier at 158lb
*Additional wear layers on bottom of tubes + up a portion of the side of the tubes (higher on sides than Outlaw)
*Frame chafe strips on top of tubes
*Superior outfitting (less handles, d-rings, etc.

All in all, they are both great boats for the price point. The RMR seems slightly more burly with the additional wear layers extending further up the side tubes and comes better outfitted from the factory, but you can do a lot of outfitting for the price difference between the RMR and the blemished Outlaw. If they were both $1600, I'd probably choose the RMR with a drop-stitch floor. With the RMR costing about $1k more, I'm happy with my choice of the Outlaw blem with an extra $1k to outfit the boat.

I also got turned on to a website called Active Junky by another 'buzz member; you can sign up for an account with them, follow their link to NRS, and they will give you a 5% refund via paypal (% changes from time to time) for all purchases made at NRS (and a bunch of other web-retailers), which sweetens the deal on the Outlaw blem price. Check it out, here.

Gary over at RaftFrame.com can make you a great frame on a budget as well. Check him out here.

PM me if you need any more info. Cheers.
 

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Jared
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I've got a 14' Outlaw that I bought as a factory imperfect at the end of the summer. I've only been out on it a couple times so far, so I have limited on-the-water experience with it so far. But, I think it's a great boat for the price. I have several buddies with RMRs, so here are my 2c on the two boats:

NRS Outlaw:
*The drop-stitch floor was great for my buddies fishing off of it
*Bigger tubes (21")
*Wider at 7'2", but feels like it has slightly less storage space due to larger tubes
*Thicker tube material 48oz/sqyd
*Thicker floor material 68oz/sqyd (this is the bottom of the boat floor. the actual drop stitch floor is a completely separate and removable unit, and is thinner than both the floor and the tubes)
*BAT attachment system for floor = totally removable, and the bladder is not directly exposed to abrasion
*Lighter at 145lb (likely due to floor design, less d-rings, handles, less wrap/protection material)
*Additional wear layers on bottom of tubes + up a portion of the side of the tubes (not as high as RMR though)
*Frame chafe strips on top of tubes
*Additional urethane (?) patches on bottom corners
*Inferior outfitting (less handles, d-rings, etc)
*BAT attachment is superior to RMR's card attachment for thwarts (in my opinion)
*Comes with a solid repair kit
*Generally felt like the boat construction was superior; seams were more consistent
*Cheaper

RMR:
*Smaller tubes (20")
*Narrower at 6'10"
*Thinner tube material 44oz/sqyd
*Not sure on floor material weight
*Heavier at 158lb
*Additional wear layers on bottom of tubes + up a portion of the side of the tubes (higher on sides than Outlaw)
*Frame chafe strips on top of tubes
*Superior outfitting (less handles, d-rings, etc.

All in all, they are both great boats for the price point. The RMR seems slightly more burly with the additional wear layers extending further up the side tubes and comes better outfitted from the factory, but you can do a lot of outfitting for the price difference between the RMR and the blemished Outlaw. If they were both $1600, I'd probably choose the RMR with a drop-stitch floor. With the RMR costing about $1k more, I'm happy with my choice of the Outlaw blem with an extra $1k to outfit the boat.

I also got turned on to a website called Active Junky by another 'buzz member; you can sign up for an account with them, follow their link to NRS, and they will give you a 5% refund via paypal (% changes from time to time) for all purchases made at NRS (and a bunch of other web-retailers), which sweetens the deal on the Outlaw blem price. Check it out, here.

Gary over at RaftFrame.com can make you a great frame on a budget as well. Check him out here.

PM me if you need any more info. Cheers.
Hey thanks for the firsthand info. How is the gap on the floor around the edges, beside the tube? Is there much of a gap, or does it fit tight?
 

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Yeah there is a gap, can't remember off hand how wide it is though.
Let me revise that reply with something actually useful: if my memory serves me correctly, there is a bit of a gap all the way around. The gap is largest at the very front of the bow and rear of the stern of the boat (on the order of 2-4"), and slightly smaller on the sides (~1-3").

The floor can be inflated to be very rigid and can be stood on.

Also, what is the story on the foot entrapment risk here?
 

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I am the happy owner of a 14'rmr. It has been down big water Hells Canyon and floor testing, rock rubbing low water Middle Fork of the Salmon trips. I max loaded er up for a 30 person Main Salmon wedding trip last September and was happy with the way the boat tracked. I was also very pleased with just how much stuff I could pile onto this boat. I was debating on getting the 16' but in hindsight I made the right choice for me. I can roll this boat by myself into an acceptable transport size and I don't see a real big difference in helping my friends carry their hysides and NRS boats. I comes with a great wrap as well for rolled up transport and the warranty was also a sale point of me. Good luck with your search.
 

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We bought a 14' NRS Outlaw at the beginning of last season (2014). I think its a great boat for the cost. The drop stitch floor inflated to 7lbs+ makes the boat very punchy and the boat turns very easily at the expense of tracking...

Unfortunately we did have an issue with the floor which caused us to bail on Westwater permit ;o( A manufacturing issue lead to the formation of a cluster of tiny holes. ;o(
We got caught in a hole right as the leak formed and took on quite a bit of water as the self bailing floor lost its ability to... well bail... It worked out though because once we took on enough water we just kinda got pulled out of the hole. Surprisingly the system was still able to bail most of the water even though the drop stitch floor was flat...

as for the manufacturing defect... Our retailer and NRS came to the rescue, repaired the manufacturing issue and also gave us a brand new floor but it took a while and our season was over.

Many people seem to be confused about the BAT system and the floor. Their are two layers to the system. The first is the 68/4000 denier floor material that has holes cut out around the inner perimeter for self bailing/ draining. The second is the drop stitch floor which is basically like a drop stitch paddle board connected to the first layer via NRS' batten attachment system.

This system works pretty well. However a-lot of people fear that given the wrong circumstances the gap between the tubes and drop stitch floor could lead to entanglement. I think that you are more likely to get entangled with another part of your rigging. This problem could be exasperated by not properly inflating your floor or possibly with children / smaller feet.

In my experience NRS stands by their products and I am happy with the boat. It is very stable, turns on a dime and punches through everything we have thrown at it. I would probably buy this boat again if I had to.
 

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I have had a tributary 14 footer for 6 years that I have used for fishing. Without the thwarts it is only 110 lbs. The floors are I beam, but I got a 2 inch sheet of ethafoam that I have trimmed and I stand on it as I fish. This protects the floor and is stable and as firm as a sup. A casting platform costs much more weighs 20 pounds. You can also sit while you fish, you dont have to stand. When the water is clear you are more likey to spook fish if you stand. I am pleased with the raft. A 13 foot raft would be enough to fish from unless you just like a larger raft.
 
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